last post


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last post

(in the British military services) n
1. (Military) a bugle call that orders men to retire for sleep
2. (Military) a similar call sounded at military funerals
taps, last post - Taps, the bugle call for lights out, was originally a drum roll and got its name from the tapping of the drums; taps are also called last post.
See also related terms for lights.
Translations

last post

n (Mil) the last postil silenzio
References in classic literature ?
The following evening there came by the last post the statement of his account.
Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
Not a word was there for me up to th last post at night.
Drink prices at The Last Post in County Square, Paisley and The Lord of the Isles in King's Inch Road, Renfrew are being slashed between January 3 and 17.
But in order for you to successfully send cards and parcels to your family and friends, it is important to prepare so you don't miss the last post and online order dates.
After the Last Post and Reveille, played by King James' pupil Heather Wood, they laid wreaths on the War Memorial before going into church for orange juice and biscuits.
The Last Post Sunday, BBC One Most people will be familiar with the phrase, "another day, another dollar".
William spoke at the Menin Gate monument in Ypres, Belgium, as the daily Last Post was played ahead of today's centenary of the start of the bloody First World War British assault.
Yesterday soldier Daniel Lewis 3446 of the Welsh Guards was remembered in a moving ceremony during which a poppy cross was erected while the Last Post rang out.
LAST Post played out as Liverpool said goodbye to the poppies at St George's Hall after 72 days in the city.
The Last Post NOT long ago, come rain or shine The postman would call at breakfast time I would dash downstairs hoping to see If someone has written a letter to me Every day I would smile and he smile back Despite walking around with a heavy sack We don't see letters any more Just leaflets pushed through the door No more does the postman look back When he's pulling leaflets from his sack No longer do we have pride in the Royal Mail Since it was put up for sale The postman may smile as he passes by He's in a rush so he just shouts Hi