last-born

last-born

or last·born (lăst′bôrn′)
adj.
Last in order of birth; youngest.
n.
One that is born last, as a youngest child.

last-born

adj
(of a child) last to be born in a family
n
the last child to be born
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
The last-born has as good a right to the pleasures of youth at the first.
Bessie sat on the hearth, nursing her last-born, and Robert and his sister played quietly in a corner.
By analysing birth rates and the gender of last-born children, the report also estimated that more than 21 million Indian girls are not wanted by their families.
The following day, Mr Mwangi kept trying to reach his last-born daughter in vain and so he decided to travel from Tana River County, where he works as a bus driver for Garsen High School.
Sorry, but while Bruce is getting the support, both privately and publicly, his last-born is clearly suffering.
In addition, compared with their last-born peers, children who experienced the birth of a younger sibling within 20 months of their own birth had an elevated mortality rate during the second year of life (2.
Another study which is conducted by Paulhus, Trapnell, and Chen16 reported the last-born personality characteristics that they are attention seeker because they refuse to accept the higher status of first-borns and use means to distinguish themselves in front of others and this characteristics show their need for succorance.
Many of us sense, quite rightly, I think, that our place in the family must make a difference but birth order needs to be put into context", says Blair, whose new book, 'Birth Order', pinpoints the characteristics of each of the four main family positions: first-born, middle-born, last-born and only child.
So, for example, if he's a last-born and you're a first-born, you'll probably find that you get on extremely well.
As my daughter, and last-born, approaches her time in the sixth form I face the prospect of buying her a wardrobe of 'smart' clothes to wear for school.
If you look at the family of the first-born child, it is very different than that of a last-born child.
As a result, the theory predicts that last-born and only children, knowing that they can get away with much more than their older brothers and sisters, are, on average, more likely to engage in risky behaviors.