latitude


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latitude

lat·i·tude

 (lăt′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1.
a. The angular distance north or south of the earth's equator, measured in degrees along a meridian, as on a map or globe.
b. A region of the earth considered in relation to its distance from the equator: temperate latitudes.
2. Astronomy The angular distance of a celestial body north or south of the ecliptic.
3. Freedom from normal restraints, limitations, or regulations. See Synonyms at room.
4. A range of values or conditions, especially the range of exposures over which a photographic film yields usable images.
5. Archaic Width; breadth.

[Middle English, geographical latitude, from Old French, width, from Latin lātitūdō, width, geographical latitude, from lātus, wide.]

lat′i·tu′din·al (-to͞od′n-əl, -tyo͞od′-) adj.
lat′i·tu′di·nal·ly adv.

latitude

(ˈlætɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. (Navigation)
a. an angular distance in degrees north or south of the equator (latitude 0°), equal to the angle subtended at the centre of the globe by the meridian between the equator and the point in question
b. (often plural) a region considered with regard to its distance from the equator. See longitude1
2. scope for freedom of action, thought, etc; freedom from restriction: his parents gave him a great deal of latitude.
3. (Photography) photog the range of exposure over which a photographic emulsion gives an acceptable negative
4. (Astronomy) astronomy See celestial latitude
[C14: from Latin lātitūdō, from lātus broad]
ˌlatiˈtudinal adj
ˌlatiˈtudinally adv

lat•i•tude

(ˈlæt ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1.
a. the angular distance, measured north or south from the equator, of a point on the earth's surface, expressed in degrees.
b. a place or region as marked by this distance: tropical latitudes.
2. freedom from narrow restrictions; freedom of action, opinion, etc.: They allow their children latitude in choosing friends.
3. the angular distance from the ecliptic of a point on the celestial sphere.
4. the ability of a photographic emulsion to record the brightness values of a subject in their true proportion to one another.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin lātitūdō breadth]
syn: See range.

lat·i·tude

(lăt′ĭ-to͞od′)
Distance north or south on the Earth's surface, measured in degrees from the equator, which has a latitude of 0°. The distance of a degree of latitude is about 69 statute miles (111 kilometers) or 60 nautical miles. Latitude and longitude are the coordinates used to identify any point on the Earth's surface. Compare longitude.

latitude

Location north or south of the equator.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.latitude - the angular distance between an imaginary line around a heavenly body parallel to its equator and the equator itselflatitude - the angular distance between an imaginary line around a heavenly body parallel to its equator and the equator itself
angular distance - the angular separation between two objects as perceived by an observer; "he recorded angular distances between the stars"
2.latitude - freedom from normal restraints in conduct; "the new freedom in movies and novels"; "allowed his children considerable latitude in how they spent their money"
liberty - freedom of choice; "liberty of opinion"; "liberty of worship"; "liberty--perfect liberty--to think or feel or do just as one pleases"; "at liberty to choose whatever occupation one wishes"
3.latitude - an imaginary line around the Earth parallel to the equator
polar circle - a line of latitude at the north or south poles
horse latitude - either of two belts or regions near 30 degrees north or 30 degrees south; characterized by calms and light-baffling winds
line - a spatial location defined by a real or imaginary unidimensional extent
tropic - either of two parallels of latitude about 23.5 degrees to the north and south of the equator representing the points farthest north and south at which the sun can shine directly overhead and constituting the boundaries of the Torrid Zone or tropics
4.latitude - scope for freedom of e.g. action or thought; freedom from restriction
ambit, range, scope, reach, compass, orbit - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"; "a piano has a greater range than the human voice"; "the ambit of municipal legislation"; "within the compass of this article"; "within the scope of an investigation"; "outside the reach of the law"; "in the political orbit of a world power"

latitude

noun scope, liberty, indulgence, freedom, play, room, space, licence, leeway, laxity, elbowroom, unrestrictedness He would be given every latitude in forming a new government.

latitude

noun
Suitable opportunity to accept or allow something:
Translations
حُرِيَّة التَّصَرُّفخَطُ العَرْضُخَط العَرْض
šířkasvobodazeměpisná šířka
breddegradhandlefrihedbredde
leveysaste
zemljopisna širina
földrajzi szélességszélesség
breidd, breiddargráîafrjálsræîi
緯度
위도
laisvėplatuma
iecietībaplatumsuzskatu brīvība
latitud
เส้นขวางขนานกับเส้นศูนย์สูตรของโลก
enlemserbestlik
vĩ độ

latitude

[ˈlætɪtjuːd] N
1. (Geog) → latitud f
2. (fig) (= freedom) → libertad f

latitude

[ˈlætɪtjuːd] n
[place] → latitude f
(= freedom) → latitude f
to be given considerable latitude in doing sth → avoir une latitude considérable pour faire qch
She was given considerable latitude in how she spent the money → Elle avait une latitude considérable quant à la manière dont elle dépensait l'argent., On lui laissait une latitude considérable quant à la manière dont elle dépensait l'argent.
to be given every latitude in doing sth → avoir toute latitude pour faire qch
He would be given every latitude in forming a government → Il aurait toute latitude pour former un gouvernement.

latitude

nBreite f; (fig)Freiheit f, → Spielraum m

latitude

[ˈlætɪtjuːd] n
a. (Geog) → latitudine f
b. (fig) (freedom) → libertà d'azione

latitude

(ˈlӕtitjuːd) noun
1. the distance, measured in degrees on the map, that a place is north or south of the Equator. What is the latitude of London?
2. freedom of choice or action.

latitude

خَطُ العَرْضُ zeměpisná šířka breddegrad Breite γεωγραφικό πλάτος latitud leveysaste latitude zemljopisna širina latitudine 緯度 위도 latitude breddegrad szerokość geograficzna latitude широта latitud เส้นขวางขนานกับเส้นศูนย์สูตรของโลก enlem vĩ độ 纬度
References in classic literature ?
The scene of this tale was in the 42d degree of latitude, where the twilight is never of long continuation.
But Hester Prynne, with a mind of native courage and activity, and for so long a period not merely estranged, but outlawed from society, had habituated herself to such latitude of speculation as was altogether foreign to the clergyman.
At one time the greatest whaling people in the world, the Dutch and Germans are now among the least; but here and there at very wide intervals of latitude and longitude, you still occasionally meet with their flag in the Pacific.
The old gray-headed father took down Morse's Atlas[3] out of the book-case, and looked out the exact latitude and longitude; and read Flint's Travels in the South and West,[4] to make up his own mind as to the nature of the country.
My heart invariably cleaved to the master's, in preference to Catherine's side: with reason I imagined, for he was kind, and trustful, and honourable; and she - she could not be called OPPOSITE, yet she seemed to allow herself such wide latitude, that I had little faith in her principles, and still less sympathy for her feelings.
Put the case that a woman, under such circumstances as you have mentioned, held her child concealed, and was obliged to communicate the fact to her legal adviser, on his representing to her that he must know, with an eye to the latitude of his defence, how the fact stood about that child.
Strange to think that the shabby little man at my side had them all fast locked, pictures upon pictures, in his brain, and as we were talking was back again in goodness knows what remote latitude.
In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added, as "Offe Caraccas," or a mere entry of latitude and longitude, as "62o 17' 20", 19o 2' 40".
By an observation, we found ourselves in the latitude of 30 degrees 2 minutes south.
Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) `--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?
Allowing the utmost latitude to the love of power which any reasonable man can require, I confess I am at a loss to discover what temptation the persons intrusted with the administration of the general government could ever feel to divest the States of the authorities of that description.
The SAFETY of the people doubtless has relation to a great variety of circumstances and considerations, and consequently affords great latitude to those who wish to define it precisely and comprehensively.