latitudinarianism


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lat·i·tu·di·nar·i·an

 (lăt′ĭ-to͞od′n-âr′ē-ən, -tyo͞od′-)
adj.
Holding or expressing broad or tolerant views, especially in religious matters.
n. Latitudinarian
A member of a group of Anglican Christians active from the 17th through the 19th century who were opposed to dogmatic positions of the Church of England and allowed reason to inform theological interpretation and judgment.

[Latin lātitūdō, lātitūdin-, latitude; see latitude + -arian.]

lat′i·tu′di·nar′i·an·ism n.

latitudinarianism

tolerance or broadmindedness, especially in matters of religion; the liberal interpretation of beliefs or doctrines. — latitudinarian, n., adj.
See also: Religion
tolerance or broadmindedness, especially in matters of religion; the liberal interpretation of beliefs or doctrines. — latitudinarian, n., adj.
See also: Attitudes
References in classic literature ?
She is a foolish, good-natured little woman, who thinks herself clever because her husband has permitted her to travel a good deal, and has evidently been rather fascinated by the latitudinarianism of continental society.
Bosworth views this book as a product of "the nascent climate of latitudinarianism in religion and political thought, and of the tentative assertion of rationality as a principle of religious enquiry, which characterize the Restoration and which find their earliest expression in the works of the Cambridge Platonists and John Locke" (p.
Suspicions about the expanding realm of "enthusiastic" evangelicalism had opened the door to liberal German theology, and invited the apt moniker of Latitudinarianism for the broad breadth of doctrinal positions within the Church.
If I were to write a history of modernism in England my starting sentence would be: the single most important determinate of the character of modernist art in this country is the latitudinarianism of the Church of England.
The Toronto statement rejects accusations of ecclesiological relativism: "There are critics, and not infrequently friends, of the ecumenical movement who criticize or praise it for its alleged inherent latitudinarianism.
11) Theologically, the sermons represent a continuum of views from mild latitudinarianism to evangelicalism.
Disarming the contention that the rise of the new science in the Netherlands was due to Calvinist values, Cook asserts that "it is clear that what was far more important was the ability to escape the intellectual constraints that religious figures of many kinds wished to place on everyone" (82-83), a kind of Dutch Latitudinarianism.
Moreover, while Goodwin's Arminianism and religious toleration became hallmarks of late-seventeenth century Anglican latitudinarianism, Coffey is careful to portray the pastor in the historical context of the Puritan Revolution.
In the interest of such responsible eclecticism, perhaps even latitudinarianism, and as a demonstration of the recursive activities reading prompts, I want to offer a little sample of the discoveries of my own reading and re-reading.