latitudinous


Also found in: Legal.

latitudinous

(ˌlætɪˈtjuːdɪnəs)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literary wide in interpretation, extent or scope
2. (Physical Geography) geography old-fashioned latitudinal
References in periodicals archive ?
66) The best example, perhaps the only example, is Justice Marshall's concurrence in Muniz, which argues for the most latitudinous construction of "testimony" that I have encountered.
Men like Adams, who ratified the Constitution on the condition of an added Bill of Rights, did so because they believed that prohibiting any unduly latitudinous construction of federal power would protect state autonomy and thereby preserve individual liberty.
187) In his essays, Amphictyon accused the Chief Justice of having adopted a "liberal and latitudinous construction" of the Necessary and Proper Clause: (188) "[S]o wide is the latitude given to the words 'general welfare,' in one of these clauses, and to the word 'necessary' in the other, that it will, (if the construction be persisted in) really become a government of almost unlimited powers.