law


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law

 (lô)
n.
1. A rule of conduct or procedure established by custom, agreement, or authority.
2.
a. The body of rules and principles governing the affairs of a community and enforced by a political authority; a legal system: international law.
b. The condition of social order and justice created by adherence to such a system: a breakdown of law and civilized behavior.
3. A set of rules or principles dealing with a specific area of a legal system: tax law; criminal law.
4.
a. A statute, ordinance, or other rule enacted by a legislature.
b. A judicially established legal requirement; a precedent.
5.
a. The system of judicial administration giving effect to the laws of a community: All citizens are equal before the law.
b. Legal action or proceedings; litigation: submit a dispute to law.
c. An impromptu or extralegal system of justice substituted for established judicial procedure: frontier law.
6.
a. An agency or agent responsible for enforcing the law. Often used with the: "The law ... stormed out of the woods as the vessel was being relieved of her cargo" (Sid Moody).
b. Informal A police officer. Often used with the.
7.
a. The science and study of law; jurisprudence.
b. Knowledge of law.
c. The profession of an attorney.
8. Something, such as an order or a dictum, having absolute or unquestioned authority: The commander's word was law.
9. Law
a. A body of principles or precepts held to express the divine will, especially as revealed in the Bible.
b. The first five books of the Hebrew Scriptures.
10. A code of principles based on morality, conscience, or nature.
11.
a. A rule or custom generally established in a particular domain: the unwritten laws of good sportsmanship.
b. A way of life: the law of the jungle.
12.
a. A statement describing a relationship observed to be invariable between or among phenomena for all cases in which the specified conditions are met: the law of gravity.
b. A generalization based on consistent experience or results: the law of supply and demand.
13. Mathematics A general principle or rule that is assumed or that has been proven to hold between expressions.
14. A principle of organization, procedure, or technique: the laws of grammar; the laws of visual perspective.
Idioms:
a law unto (oneself)
A totally independent operator: An executive who is a law unto herself.
take the law into (one's) own hands
To mete out justice as one sees fit without due recourse to law enforcement agencies or the courts.

[Middle English, from Old English lagu, from Old Norse *lagu, variant of lag, that which is laid down; see legh- in Indo-European roots.]

law

(lɔː)
n
1. (Law) a rule or set of rules, enforceable by the courts, regulating the government of a state, the relationship between the organs of government and the subjects of the state, and the relationship or conduct of subjects towards each other
2. (Law)
a. a rule or body of rules made by the legislature. See statute law
b. a rule or body of rules made by a municipal or other authority. See bylaw
3. (Law)
a. the condition and control enforced by such rules
b. (in combination): lawcourt.
4. a rule of conduct: a law of etiquette.
5. one of a set of rules governing a particular field of activity: the laws of tennis.
6. (Law) the legal or judicial system
7. (Law) the profession or practice of law
8. informal the police or a policeman
9. a binding force or statement: his word is law.
10. Also called: law of nature a generalization based on a recurring fact or event
11. (Law) the science or knowledge of law; jurisprudence
12. (Law) the principles originating and formerly applied only in courts of common law. Compare equity3
13. a general principle, formula, or rule describing a phenomenon in mathematics, science, philosophy, etc: the laws of thermodynamics.
14. (Judaism) the Law (capital) Judaism
a. short for Law of Moses
b. the English term for Torah See also Oral Law, Written Law
15. a law unto itself a law unto himself a person or thing that is outside established laws
16. (Law) go to law to resort to legal proceedings on some matter
17. lay down the law to speak in an authoritative or dogmatic manner
18. (Judaism) reading the Law reading of the Law Judaism that part of the morning service on Sabbaths, festivals, and Mondays and Thursdays during which a passage is read from the Torah scrolls
19. take the law into one's own hands to ignore or bypass the law when redressing a grievance
[Old English lagu, from Scandinavian; compare Icelandic lög (pl) things laid down, law]

law

(lɔː)
n
(Physical Geography) Scot a hill, esp one rounded in shape
[Old English hlǣw]

law

(lɔː)
adj
a Scot word for low1

Law

(lɔː)
n
1. (Biography) Andrew Bonar (ˈbɒnə). 1858–1923, British Conservative statesman, born in Canada; prime minister (1922–23)
2. (Biography) Denis. born 1940, Scottish footballer; a striker, he played for Manchester United (1962–73) and Scotland (30 goals in 55 games, 1958–74); European Footballer of the Year (1964)
3. (Biography) John. 1671–1729, Scottish financier. He founded the first bank in France (1716) and the Mississippi Scheme for the development of Louisiana (1717), which collapsed due to excessive speculation
4. (Biography) Jude. born 1972, British film actor, who starred in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), Cold Mountain (2003), and Sherlock Holmes (2009)
5. (Biography) William. 1686–1761, British Anglican divine, best known for A Serious Call to a Holy and Devout Life (1728)

law

(lɔ)
n.
1. the principles and regulations established by a government or other authority and applicable to a people, whether by legislation or by custom enforced by judicial decision.
2. any written or positive rule or collection of rules prescribed under the authority of the state or nation, as by the people in its constitution.
3. a system or collection of such rules.
4. the condition of society brought about by observance of such rules: maintaining law and order.
5. the field of knowledge concerned with these rules; jurisprudence: to study law.
6. the body of such rules concerned with a particular subject: commercial law; tax law.
7. an act of the highest legislative body of a state or nation.
8. the profession that deals with law and legal procedure: to practice law.
9. legal action; litigation: to go to law.
10. an agent or agency that enforces the law, esp. the police: The law arrived to quell the riot.
11. any rule or injunction that must be obeyed.
12. a rule or principle of proper conduct sanctioned by conscience, concepts of natural justice, or the will of a deity: a moral law.
13. a rule or manner of behavior that is instinctive or spontaneous: the law of self-preservation.
14. (in philosophy, science, etc.)
a. a statement of a relation or sequence of phenomena invariable under the same conditions.
b. a mathematical rule.
15. a principle based on the predictable consequences of an act, condition, etc.: the law of supply and demand.
16. a rule, principle, or convention regarded as governing the structure or the relationship of an element in the structure of something, as of a language or work of art: the laws of grammar.
17. a commandment or a revelation from God.
18. (sometimes cap.) a divinely appointed order or system.
19. the Law, Law of Moses.
20. the preceptive part of the Bible, esp. of the New Testament, in contradistinction to its promises: the law of Christ.
v.i.
21. to institute legal action; sue.
v.t.
22. Chiefly Dial. to sue or prosecute.
Idioms:
1. be a law to or unto oneself, to act independently or unconventionally, esp. without regard for established mores.
2. lay down the law, to issue orders imperiously.
3. take the law into one's own hands, to administer justice as one sees fit without recourse to legal processes.
[before 1000; Middle English law(e),lagh(e), Old English lagu < Old Norse *lagu, early pl. of lag layer, laying in order]

Law

(lɔ)

n.
John, 1671–1729, Scottish financier.

law

(lô)
A statement that describes what will happen in all cases under a specified set of conditions. Laws describe an invariable relationship among phenomena. Boyle's law, for instance, describes what will happen to the volume of a gas if its pressure changes and its temperature remains the same. See Note at hypothesis.

Law

See also crime; government

a signature of a proxy, one who is not party to the transaction at hand. — allographic, adj.
the right of a nation at war to destroy the property of a neutral, subject to indemnification.
a state or condition of individuals or society characterized by an absence or breakdown of social and legal norms and values, as in the case of an uprooted people. — anomic, adj.
a real or apparent contradiction in a statute. — antinomic, antinomian, adj.
the theological doctrine maintaining that Christians are freed from both moral and civil law by God’s gift of grace. — antinomian, antinomist, n.
the solemn affirmation of the truth of a statement. — asseverator, n. — asseverative, adj.
the crime of adultery.
the offense of frequently exciting or stirring up suits and quarrels between others. — barrator, n. — barratrous, adj.
an intentional act that, directly or indirectly, causes harmful contact with another’s person.
a legal notice to beware; a notice placed on file until the caveator can be heard. — caveator, n. — caveatee, n.
a person who studies civil law.
formerly, in common law, acquittal on the basis of endorsement by the friends or neighbors of the accused. Also called trial by wager of law. — compurgator, n. — compurgatory, adj.
one who testifies to the innocence of an accused person.
a person who puts a particular interpretation on provisions of the U.S. Constitution, especially those provisions dealing with the rights of individuals and states.
the status of a married woman.
an act or action having the character of a crime. Also criminality. — criminal, n., adj.
1. the condition of blameworthiness, criminality, censurability.
2. Obsolete, guilt. — culpable, adj.
a condition of guilt; failure to do that which the law or other obligation requires. See also finance. — delinquent, adj.
Obsolete, a delineation of jurisdiction.
an abnormal fear or dislike of justice.
Archaic. 1. the act of disinheriting.
2. the condition of being disinherited.
any unreasonable harshness or severity in laws. — Draconian, Draconic, adj.
the right one landowner has been granted over the land of another, as the right of access to water, right of way, etc., at no charge.
1. a specialist in law relating to the feudal system.
2. a person who holds or Iets land under the provisions of the feudal system.
a person to whom property or power is entrusted for the benefit of another. — fiducial, fiduciary, adj.
1. law as a science or philosophy.
2. a system of laws or a particular branch of law. — jurisprudent, adj.
an expert on the codification and revision of Roman laws ordered by the 6th-century Byzantine emperor Justinian. — Justinian code, n.
language typical of lawyers, laws, legal forms, etc., characterized by archaic usage, prolixity, redundancy and extreme thoroughness.
a strict and usually literal adherence to the law. — legalistic, adj.
a person who is skilled or well versed in law.
a compulsion for involving oneself in legal disputes.
the practice of religious legalism, especially the basing of standards of good actions upon the moral law.
a system of government based on a legal code.
1. the art of drafting laws.
2. a treatise on the drawing up of laws. — nomographer, n. — nomographic, adj.
the science of law. — nomologist, n. — nomological, adj.
the state of being under the age required by law to enter into certain responsibilities or obligations, as marrying, entering into contracts, etc. See also church; property and ownership.
a legal code or complete body or system of laws.
1. the writer of a complete code of the laws of a country.
2. the writer of a complete digest of materials on a subject.
1. a lawyer whose practice is of a small or petty character; a lawyer of little importance.
2. a shyster lawyer. — pettifoggery, n.
the rights or legal status of the last child bom in a family. Also called ultimogeniture. Cf. primogeniture.
the rights or legal status of the first born in a family. Cf. postremogeniture.
an expert in public or international law.
the advocacy of revision, especially in relation to court decisions. — revisionist, n. — revisionary, adj.
1. the state or practice of being a squatter, or one who settles on government land, thereby establishing ownership.
2. the state or practice of settling in vacant or abandoned property, either for shelter or in an attempt to establish ownership. — squatter, n.
the drawing up of legal documents. — symbolaeographer, n.
postremogeniture.
1. the condition of land tenure of a vassal.
2. the fief or lands held.

Law

 

See Also: LAWYERS

  1. Corpuses, statutes, rights and equities are passed on like congenital disease —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  2. Exact laws, like all the other ultimates and absolutes, are as fabulous as the crock of gold at the rainbow’s end —G. N. Lewis
  3. Going to law is like skinning a new milk cow for the hide, and giving the meat to the lawyers —Josh Billings

    The original in Billings’ popular dialect form reads as follows: “Going tew law iz like skinning a new milch … .tew the lawyers.”

  4. Great cases like hard cases make bad law —Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

    Justice Holmes expanded on his simile as follows: “For great cases are called great not by reason of their real importance in shaping the law of the future but because of some accident of immediate overwhelming interest which appeals to the feelings and distorts the judgment.”

  5. Law is a bottomless pit —John Arbuthnot

    Arbuthnot continues as follows: “It is a cormorant, a harpy that devours everything!”

  6. Law is a form of order, and good law must necessarily mean good order —Aristotle
  7. The law is a sort of hocus-pocus science, that smiles in your face while it picks your pocket —Charles Macklin
  8. The law is like apparel which alters with the time —Sir John Doddridge
  9. Law is like pregnancy, a little of either being a dangerous thing —Robert Traver
  10. The law often dances like an old fishwife in wooden shoes, with little grace and less dispatch —George Garrett

    In Garrett’s historical novel, Death of the Fox, this simile is voiced by Sir Francis Bacon.

  11. Laws and institutions … like clocks, they must be occasionally cleansed, and wound up, and set to true time —Henry Ward Beecher
  12. (Written) laws are like spiders’ webs; they hold the weak and delicate who might be caught in their meshes, but are torn in pieces by the rich and powerful —Anarchis

    The spiders’ web comparison to the law has been much used and modified. Here are some examples: “Laws, like cobwebs, entangle the weak, but are broken by the strong;” “Laws are like spiders’ webs, so that the great buzzing bees break through, and the little feeble flies hang fast in them” (Henry Smith); “Laws are like cobwebs, which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through” (Jonathan Swift); “Laws, like cobwebs, catch small flies, great ones break through before your eyes” (Benjamin Franklin); “Laws, like the spider’s web, catch the fly and let the hawk go free” (Spanish proverb).

  13. Law should be like death, which spares no one —Charles de Secondat Montesquieu
  14. Laws, like houses, lean on one another —Edmund Burke
  15. Laws should be like clothes. They should fit the people they are meant to serve —Clarence Darrow
  16. Laws wise as nature, and as fixed as fate —Alexander Pope
  17. Legal as a Supreme Court decision —Anon
  18. Legal studies … sharpen, indeed, but like a grinding stone narrow whilst they sharpen —Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  19. Liked law because it was a system like a jigsaw puzzle, whose pieces, if you studied them long enough, all fell into place —Will Weaver
  20. The science of legislation is like that of medicine in one respect, that it is far more easy to point out what will do harm than what will do good —Charles Caleb Colton
  21. Suits at court are like winter nights, long and wearisome —Thomas Deloney
  22. To try a case twice is like eating yesterday morning’s oatmeal —Lloyd Paul Stryker

    See Also: REPETITION, STALENESS

  23. Violations of the law, like viruses, are present all the time. Everybody does them. Whether or not they produce a disease, or a prosecution, is a function of the body politic —Anon quote, New York Times/Washington Talk, November 28, 1986

law

A rule describing certain natural observable phenomena or the relationship between effects of variable quantities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.law - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
impounding, impoundment, internment, poundage - placing private property in the custody of an officer of the law
award, awarding - a grant made by a law court; "he criticized the awarding of compensation by the court"
appointment - (law) the act of disposing of property by virtue of the power of appointment; "she allocated part of the trust to her church by appointment"
remit, remitment, remission - (law) the act of remitting (especially the referral of a law case to another court)
novation - (law) the replacement of one obligation by another by mutual agreement of both parties; usually the replacement of one of the original parties to a contract with the consent of the remaining party
subrogation - (law) the act of substituting of one creditor for another
disbarment - the act of expelling a lawyer from the practice of law
chance-medley - an unpremeditated killing of a human being in self defense
derogation - (law) the partial taking away of the effectiveness of a law; a partial repeal or abolition of a law; "any derogation of the common law is to be strictly construed"
recission, rescission - (law) the act of rescinding; the cancellation of a contract and the return of the parties to the positions they would have had if the contract had not been made; "recission may be brought about by decree or by mutual consent"
abatement of a nuisance, nuisance abatement - (law) the removal or termination or destruction of something that has been found to be a nuisance
production - (law) the act of exhibiting in a court of law; "the appellate court demanded the production of all documents"
practice of law, law - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate study in a law school and that is responsible for the judicial system; "he studied law at Yale"
law practice - the practice of law
civil wrong, tort - (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought
juvenile delinquency, delinquency - an antisocial misdeed in violation of the law by a minor
comparative negligence - (law) negligence allocated between the plaintiff and the defendant with a corresponding reduction in damages paid to the plaintiff
concurrent negligence - (law) negligence of two of more persons acting independently; the plaintiff may sue both together or separately
contributory negligence - (law) behavior by the plaintiff that contributes to the harm resulting from the defendant's negligence; "in common law any degree of contributory negligence would bar the plaintiff from collecting damages"
criminal negligence, culpable negligence - (law) recklessly acting without reasonable caution and putting another person at risk of injury or death (or failing to do something with the same consequences)
neglect of duty - (law) breach of a duty
barratry - the offense of vexatiously persisting in inciting lawsuits and quarrels
champerty - an unethical agreement between an attorney and client that the attorney would sue and pay the costs of the client's suit in return for a portion of the damages awarded; "soliciting personal injury cases may constitute champerty"
criminal maintenance, maintenance - the unauthorized interference in a legal action by a person having no interest in it (as by helping one party with money or otherwise to continue the action) so as to obstruct justice or promote unnecessary litigation or unsettle the peace of the community; "unlike champerty, criminal maintenance does not necessarily involve personal profit"
false pretence, false pretense - (law) an offense involving intent to defraud and false representation and obtaining property as a result of that misrepresentation
resisting arrest - physical efforts to oppose a lawful arrest; the resistance is classified as assault and battery upon the person of the police officer attempting to make the arrest
sedition - an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government
sex crime, sex offense, sexual abuse, sexual assault - a statutory offense that provides that it is a crime to knowingly cause another person to engage in an unwanted sexual act by force or threat; "most states have replaced the common law definition of rape with statutes defining sexual assault"
kidnapping, snatch - (law) the unlawful act of capturing and carrying away a person against their will and holding them in false imprisonment
actual possession - (law) immediate and direct physical control over property
constructive possession - (law) having the power and intention to have and control property but without direct control or actual presence upon it
criminal possession - (law) possession for which criminal sanctions are provided because the property may not lawfully be possessed or may not be possessed under certain circumstances
intervention - (law) a proceeding that permits a person to enter into a lawsuit already in progress; admission of person not an original party to the suit so that person can protect some right or interest that is allegedly affected by the proceedings; "the purpose of intervention is to prevent unnecessary duplication of lawsuits"
2.law - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activitylaw - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity; "there is a law against kidnapping"
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
anti-drug law - a law forbidding the sale or use of narcotic drugs
anti-racketeering law, Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, RICO, RICO Act - law intended to eradicate organized crime by establishing strong sanctions and forfeiture provisions
antitrust law, antitrust legislation - law intended to promote free competition in the market place by outlawing monopolies
statute of limitations - a statute prescribing the time period during which legal action can be taken
constitution, fundamental law, organic law - law determining the fundamental political principles of a government
public law - a law affecting the public at large
blue law - a statute regulating work on Sundays
blue sky law - a state law regulating the sale of securities in an attempt to control the sale of securities in fraudulent enterprises
gag law - any law that limits freedom of the press
homestead law - a law conferring privileges on owners of homesteads
poor law - a law providing support for the poor
Riot Act - a former English law requiring mobs to disperse after a magistrate reads the law to them
prohibition - a law forbidding the sale of alcoholic beverages; "in 1920 the 18th amendment to the Constitution established prohibition in the US"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.law - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
divine law - a law that is believed to come directly from God
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
4.law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
all-or-none law - (neurophysiology) a nerve impulse resulting from a weak stimulus is just as strong as a nerve impulse resulting from a strong stimulus
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
Archimedes' principle, law of Archimedes - (hydrostatics) the apparent loss in weight of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid
Avogadro's hypothesis, Avogadro's law - the principle that equal volumes of all gases (given the same temperature and pressure) contain equal numbers of molecules
Bernoulli's law, law of large numbers - (statistics) law stating that a large number of items taken at random from a population will (on the average) have the population statistics
Benford's law - a law used by auditors to identify fictitious populations of numbers; applies to any population of numbers derived from other numbers; "Benford's law holds that 30% of the time the first non-zero digit of a derived number will be 1 and it will be 9 only 4.6% of the time"
Bose-Einstein statistics - (physics) statistical law obeyed by a system of particles whose wave function is not changed when two particles are interchanged (the Pauli exclusion principle does not apply)
Boyle's law, Mariotte's law - the pressure of an ideal gas at constant temperature varies inversely with the volume
Coulomb's Law - a fundamental principle of electrostatics; the force of attraction or repulsion between two charged particles is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the distance between them; principle also holds for magnetic poles
Dalton's law of partial pressures, law of partial pressures, Dalton's law - (chemistry and physics) law stating that the pressure exerted by a mixture of gases equals the sum of the partial pressures of the gases in the mixture; the pressure of a gas in a mixture equals the pressure it would exert if it occupied the same volume alone at the same temperature
distribution law - (chemistry) the total energy in an assembly of molecules is not distributed equally but is distributed around an average value according to a statistical distribution
equilibrium law, law of chemical equilibrium - (chemistry) the principle that (at chemical equilibrium) in a reversible reaction the ratio of the rate of the forward reaction to the rate of the reverse reaction is a constant for that reaction
Fechner's law, Weber-Fechner law - (psychophysics) the concept that the magnitude of a subjective sensation increases proportional to the logarithm of the stimulus intensity; based on early work by E. H. Weber
Fermi-Dirac statistics - (physics) law obeyed by a systems of particles whose wave function changes when two particles are interchanged (the Pauli exclusion principle applies)
Charles's law, Gay-Lussac's law, law of volumes - (physics) the density of an ideal gas at constant pressure varies inversely with the temperature
Henry's law - (chemistry) law formulated by the English chemist William Henry; the amount of a gas that will be absorbed by water increases as the gas pressure increases
Hooke's law - (physics) the principle that (within the elastic limit) the stress applied to a solid is proportional to the strain produced
Hubble law, Hubble's law - (astronomy) the generalization that the speed of recession of distant galaxies (the red shift) is proportional to their distance from the observer
Kepler's law, Kepler's law of planetary motion - (astronomy) one of three empirical laws of planetary motion stated by Johannes Kepler
Kirchhoff's laws - (physics) two laws governing electric networks in which steady currents flow: the sum of all the currents at a point is zero and the sum of the voltage gains and drops around any closed circuit is zero
law of averages - a law affirming that in the long run probabilities will determine performance
law of constant proportion, law of definite proportions - (chemistry) law stating that every pure substance always contains the same elements combined in the same proportions by weight
law of diminishing returns - a law affirming that to continue after a certain level of performance has been reached will result in a decline in effectiveness
law of effect - (psychology) the principle that behaviors are selected by their consequences; behavior having good consequences tends to be repeated whereas behavior that leads to bad consequences is not repeated
law of equivalent proportions, law of reciprocal proportions - (chemistry) law stating that the proportions in which two elements separately combine with a third element are also the proportions in which they combine together
law of gravitation, Newton's law of gravitation - (physics) the law that states any two bodies attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
5.law - the branch of philosophy concerned with the law and the principles that lead courts to make the decisions they do
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
contract law - that branch of jurisprudence that studies the rights and obligations of parties entering into contracts
corporation law - that branch of jurisprudence that studies the laws governing corporations
matrimonial law - that branch of jurisprudence that studies the laws governing matrimony
patent law - that branch of jurisprudence that studies the laws governing patents
6.law - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate study in a law school and that is responsible for the judicial system; "he studied law at Yale"
learned profession - one of the three professions traditionally believed to require advanced learning and high principles
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
traverse, deny - deny formally (an allegation of fact by the opposing party) in a legal suit
disbar - remove from the bar; expel from the practice of law by official action; "The corrupt lawyer was disbarred"
7.law - the force of policemen and officerslaw - the force of policemen and officers; "the law came looking for him"
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
European Law Enforcement Organisation, Europol - police organization for the European Union; aims to improve effectiveness and cooperation among European police forces
gendarmerie, gendarmery - French police force; a group of gendarmes or gendarmes collectively
Mutawa, Mutawa'een - religious police in Saudi Arabia whose duty is to ensure strict adherence to established codes of conduct; offenders may be detained indefinitely; foreigners are not excluded
Mounties, RCMP, Royal Canadian Mounted Police - the federal police force of Canada
New Scotland Yard, Scotland Yard - the detective department of the metropolitan police force of London
secret police - a police force that operates in secrecy (usually against persons suspected of treason or sedition)
Schutzstaffel, SS - special police force in Nazi Germany founded as a personal bodyguard for Adolf Hitler in 1925; the SS administered the concentration camps
law enforcement agency - an agency responsible for insuring obedience to the laws
posse, posse comitatus - a temporary police force
police officer, policeman, officer - a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"

law

noun
1. constitution, code, legislation, charter, jurisprudence Obscene and threatening phone calls are against the law.
2. the police, constabulary, the police force, law enforcement agency, the boys in blue (informal), the fuzz (slang), the Old Bill (slang) If you lot don't stop fighting I'll have the law round.
5. principle, standard, code, formula, criterion, canon, precept, axiom inflexible moral laws
6. the legal profession, the bar, barristers a career in law
lay down the law be dogmatic, call the shots (informal), pontificate, rule the roost, crack the whip, boss around, dogmatize, order about or around traditional parents who believed in laying down the law for their offspring
Related words
adjectives legal, judicial, juridicial, jural
Quotations
"The end of the law is, not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom" [John Locke Second Treatise of Civil Government]
"It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that's pretty important" [Martin Luther King Jr]
"The law is a causeway upon which so long as he keeps to it a citizen may walk safely" [Robert Bolt A Man For All Seasons]
"No brilliance is needed in the law. Nothing but common sense, and relatively clean finger nails" [John Mortimer A Voyage Round My Father]
"Laws were made to be broken" [John Wilson Noctes Ambrosianae]
"The Common Law of England has been laboriously built about a mythical figure - the figure of "The Reasonable Man"" [A.P. Herbert Uncommon Law]
"We do not get good laws to restrain bad people. We get good people to restrain bad laws" [G.K. Chesterton All Things Considered]
"The law is a ass - a idiot" [Charles Dickens Oliver Twist]
"Written laws are like spider's webs; they will catch, it is true, the weak and poor, but would be torn in pieces by the rich and powerful" [Anacharsis]
"Law is a bottomless pit" [Dr. Arbuthnot The History of John Bull]
"The one great principle of the English law is to make business for itself" [Charles Dickens Bleak House]
"The laws of most countries are far worse than the people who execute them, and many of them are only able to remain laws by being seldom or never carried into effect" [John Stuart Mill The Subjection of Women]
Proverbs
"Hard cases make bad laws"
"One law for the rich, and another for the poor"

Law

Law terms  abandonee, abate, abator, abet, abeyance, able, absente reo, absolute, acceptance (Contract law), accessory or accessary, accretion, accrue, accusation, accusatorial, accuse, accused, the, acquit, action, actionable, act of God, adjective, ad litem, adminicle, administration order, admissible, adopt, adult, advocate, advocation, affiant, affidavit, affiliate or filiate, affiliation or filiation, affiliation order, affiliation proceedings or (U.S.) paternity suit, affirm, affirmation, affray, agist, alibi, alienable, alienate, alienation, alienee, alienor, alimony, allege, alluvion, ambulatory, a mensa et thoro, amerce (obsolete), amicus curiae, amnesty, ancient, annulment, answer, Anton Piller order, appeal, appearance, appellant, appellate, appellee, appendant, approve, arbitrary, arbitration, arraign, array, arrest judgment, arrest of judgement, articled clerk, assault, assessor, assets, assign, assignee, assignment, assignor, assumpsit, attach, attachment, attainder, attaint (archaic), attorn, attorney, attorney-at-law, attorney general, authentic, authority, automatism, aver, avoid, avoidance, avow (rare), avulsion, award, bail, bailable, bailee (Contract law), bailiff, bailiwick, bailment (Contract law), bailor (Contract law), bailsman (rare), ban, bankrupt, bar, baron (English law), barratry or barretry, barrister or barrister-at-law, bench, the, bencher, beneficial, beneficiary, bequeath, bequest, bigamy, bill of attainder, bill of indictment, bill of sale, blasphemy or blasphemous libel, body corporate, bona fides, bona vacantia, bond, bondsman, breach of promise, breach of the peace, breach of trust, brief, briefless, bring, burden of proof, capias, capital, caption, carnal knowledge, cartulary or chartulary, case, case law, case stated or stated case, cassation, cause, caution, CAV, Cur. adv. vult, or Curia advisari vult, caveat, caveator, certificate of incorporation (Company law), chamber counsel or counsellor, chambers, certification, certiorari, cessor, cessionary, challenge, challenge to the array, challenge to the polls, champerty, chance-medley, chancery, change of venue, charge, chargeable, cheat, chief justice, chose, circuit (English law), citation, cite, civil death, civil marriage, clerk to the justices, close, codicil, codification, coexecutor, cognizable or cognisable, cognizance or cognisance, collusion, come on, commitment, committal, or (especially formerly) mittimus, common, commonage, common law, commutable, commutation, commute, competence, competency, competent, complainant, complaint (English law), complete (Land law), compound, compliance officer, composition, compurgation, conclusion, condemn, condition, condone, confiscate, connivance, connive, conscience clause, consensual, consideration, consolidation, consortium, constituent, constitute, constructive, contempt, contentious, continuance (U.S.), contraband, contract, contractor, contributory (Company law), contributory negligence, contumacy, convene, conventional, conversion, convert, conveyance, convincing, coparcenary or coparceny, coparcener or parcener, copyhold, copyholder, co-respondent, coroner, coroner's inquest, coroner's jury, corpus delicti, corpus juris, Corpus Juris Civilis, costs, counsel, counselor or counselor-at-law (U.S.), count, countercharge, counterclaim, counterpart, countersign, county court, court, court of first instance, covenant, coverture, covin, criminal conversation, criminate (rare), cross-examine, crown court (English law), cruelty, culpa (Civil law), culprit, cumulative evidence, custodian, custody, custom, customary, cy pres, damages, damnify, dead letter, debatable, decedent (chiefly U.S.), declarant, declaration, declaratory, decree, decree absolute, decree nisi, deed, deed poll, defalcate, defamation, default, defeasible, defeat, defence, defendant, deferred sentence, de jure, delict (Roman law), demand, demandant, demisit sine prole, demur, demurrer, denunciation (obsolete), deodand (English law), deponent, depose, deposition, deraign or darraign (obsolete), dereliction, descendible or descendable, desertion, detainer, determinable, determination, determine, detinue, devil, devisable, devise, devolve, dies non or dies non juridicus, digest, diligence, diminished responsibility, direct evidence, disaffirm, disafforest or disforest (English law), disannul, disbar, discharge, disclaim, discommon, discontinue, discovert, discovery, disinherit, dismiss, disorderly, disorderly conduct, disorderly house, dissent, distrain or distress, distrainee, distraint, distributee (chiefly U.S.), distribution, distringas, disturbance, dividend, divorce from bed and board (U.S.), docket, documentation, Doe, domain, donee, donor, dot (Civil law), dotation, dowable, dower, droit, due process of law, duress, earnest or earnest money (Contract law), effectual, emblements, eminent domain, empanel or impanel, encumbrance, encumbrancer, enfranchise (English law), engross, engrossment, enjoin, enter, equitable, equity, escheat, escrow, estop, estoppel, estovers, estray, estreat, evict, evidence, evocation (French law), examination, examine, examine-in-chief, exception, execute, execution, executor or (fem.) executrix, executory, exemplary damages, exemplify, exhibit, ex parte, expectancy, expropriate, extend, extent (U.S.), extinguish, extraditable, extradite, extrajudicial, eyre (English legal history), fact, factor (Commercial law), false imprisonment, Family Division, felo de se, feme, feme covert, feme sole, fiction, fideicommissary (Civil law), fideicommissum (Civil law), fiduciary or fiducial, fieri facias, file, filiate, filiation, find, finding, first offender, fiscal, flaw, folio, forbearance, force majeure, foreclose, foreign, foreman, forensic, forensic medicine, legal medicine, or medical jurisprudence, forest, forfeit, forjudge or forejudge, fornication, free, fungible, garnish, garnishee, garnishment, gavelkind (English law), gist, goods and chattels, grand jury (chiefly U.S.), grand larceny, grantee, grant, grantor, gratuitous, gravamen, grith (English legal history), ground rent, guarantee, guardian, guilty, habeas corpus, hand down (U.S. & Canad.), handling, hear, hearing, hearsay, heir or (fem.) heiress (Civil law), heirship, hereditary, heres or haeres (Civil law), heritable, heritage, heritor, holder, homologate, hung jury, hypothec (Roman law), hypothecate, immovable, impartible, impediment, imperfect, implead (rare), imprescriptable, in articles, in banc, in camera, incapacitate, incapacity, in chancery, incompetent, incorporeal, incriminate, indefeasible, indemnity, indenture, indeterminate sentence, inducement, in escrow, infant, in fee, inferior court, infirm, in flagrante delicto or flagrante delicto, ingoing, inheritance, injunction, injury, innuendo, in personam, in posse, inquest, inquisition, inquisitorial, in rem, insanity, in specie, instanter, institutes, instruct, instructions, instrument, insurable interest, intendment, intent, intention, interdict (Civil law), interlocutory, interplead, interpleader, interrogatories, intervene, inter vivos, intestate, invalidate, in venter, ipso jure, irrepleviable or irreplevisable, issuable, issue, jail delivery (English law), jeopardy, joinder, joint, jointress, jointure, judge, judge-made, judges' rules, judgment or judgement, judgment by default, judicable, judicative, judicatory, judicature, judicial, judicial separation (Family law), judiciary, junior, jural, jurat, juratory, juridical, jurisconsult, jurisprudence, jurisprudent, jurist, juristic, juror, jury, juryman or (fem.) jurywoman, jury process, jus, jus gentium (Roman law), jus naturale (Roman law), jus sanguinis, jus soli, justice, justice court, justice of the peace, justiciable, justices in eyre (English legal history), justify, juvenile court, laches, land, lapse, larceny, Law French, Law Lords, law merchant (Mercantile law), lawsuit, law term, lawyer, leasehold, leaseholder, legist, letters of administration, lex loci, lex non scripta, lex scripta, lex talionis, libel, lien, limit, limitation, lis pendens, litigable, litigant, litigation, locus standi, magistrate, magistrates' court or petty sessions, maintenance, malfeasance, malice, manager, mandamus, mandate (Roman or Contract law), manslaughter, manus, mare clausum, mare liberum, material, matter, mayhem or maihem, memorandum, mens rea, mental disorder, mental impairment, merger, merits, mesne, ministerial, misadventure, mise, misfeasance, misjoinder, mispleading, mistrial, misuser, mittimus, monopoly, moral, moratorium, morganatic or left-handed, mortgagee, mortmain or (less commonly) dead hand, motion, moveable or movable, muniments, mute, naked, Napoleonic Code, necessaries, negligence, next friend, nisi, nisi prius (history or U.S.), nolle prosequi, nol. pros., or nolle pros., nolo contendere (chiefly U.S.), nonage, non compos mentis, nonfeasance, nonjoinder, non liquet, non prosequitur or non pros., nonsuit, notary public, not guilty, novation, novel (Roman law), nude, nudum pactum, nuisance, oath, obiter dictum, obligation, oblivion, obreption, obscene, obtaining by deception, occupancy, occupant, offer (Contract law), Official Referee, onerous, onomastic, on, upon or under oath, onus probandi, open, opening, ordinary, overt, owelty, oyer (English legal history), oyer and terminer, panel, paraphernalia, pardon, parol, Particulars of Claim, party, paterfamilias (Roman law), peculium (Roman law), pecuniary, pecuniary advantage, pendente lite, perception, peremptory, persistent cruelty, personal, personal property or personalty, petit, petition, petitioner, petit jury or petty jury, petit larceny or petty larceny, petty, place of safety order, plaint, plaintiff, plea, plea bargaining, plead, pleading, pleadings, portion, port of entry, posse, posse comitatus, possessory, post-obit, prayer, precedent, precept, predispose, pre-emption, prefer, preference, premeditation, premises, prescribe, prescription, presentment (chiefly U.S.), presents, presume, presumption, preterition (Roman law), prima facie, primogeniture, principal, private law, private nuisance, privilege, privileged, privity, privy, prize court, probable cause, probate, proceed, proceeding, process, process-server, procuration, procuratory, prohibition, promisee (Contract law), promisor (Contract law), proof, property centre, proponent, propositus, propound (English law), prosecute, prosecuting attorney (U.S.), prosecution, prosecutor, prothonotary or protonotary, prove, provocation (English criminal law), psychopathic disorder, public defender (U.S.), public law, public nuisance, public prosecutor, pupil (Civil law), pupillage, pursuant, purview, quarter sessions, queen's or king's evidence, question, question of fact (English law), question of law (English law), quitclaim, quo warranto, real, real property, rebutter, recaption, receivership, recital, recognizance or recognisance, recognizee or recognisee, recognizor or recognisor, recorder, recoup, recover, recovery, recrimination, re-examine, reference, refresher (English law), rejoin, rejoinder, relation, relator (English or U.S. law), release, relief, remand, remise, remission, remit, repetition (Civil law), replevin, replevy, replication, reply, report, reporter, representation (Contract law), reprieve, rescue, reservation, res gestae, residuary, residue, res ipsa loquitur, res judicata or res adjudicata, resolutive, respondent, rest, restitution, restrictive covenant, retain, retry, return, returnable, reverse, review, right of common, riot, rout, rule, ruling, run, salvo, saving, scandal, schedule, scienter, scire facias (rare), script, secularize or secularise, self-defence, self-executing, sentence, separation (Family law), sequester or sequestrate, sequestration, serjeant at law, serjeant, sergeant at law, or sergeant, servitude, session, settlement, settlor, severable, several, severance, sign, signatory, sine, sine prole, slander, smart money (U.S.), socage (English law), soke (English legal history), solatium (chiefly U.S.), sole, solemnity, solicitor, solution, sound, sound in, special case, special pleading, specialty, specific performance, spinster, spoliation, squat, stale, stand by (English law), stand down, statement, statement of claim, state's evidence (U.S.), statute law, statutory declaration, stillicide, stipulate (Roman law), stranger, stultify, submission, subpoena, subreption (rare), subrogate, subrogation, substantive, succeed, sue, sui juris, suit, suitor, summary, summary jurisdiction, summary offence, summation (U.S. law), summing-up, summons, suo jure, suo loco, surcharge, surety, surplusage, surrebuttal, surrebutter, surrejoinder, surrender, suspension, swear, swear in, swear out (U.S.), tales, tenancy, tenantry, tender, tenor, term, termor or termer, territorial court (U.S.), testament, testamentary, testate, testify, testimony, thing, third party, time immemorial, tipstaff, title, tort, tort-feasor, tortious, traffic court, transfer, transitory action, traverse, treasure-trove, trespass, triable, trial, trial court, tribunal, trover, try, udal, ultimogeniture, ultra vires, unalienable, unappealable, unavoidable, uncovenanted, unilateral, unincorporated, unlawful assembly, unreasonable behaviour, unwritten law, use, user, utter barrister, vacant, vacate, variance, vendee, vendor, venire facias, venireman (U.S.), venue, verdict, verification, verify, versus, vesture, vexatious, view, viewer, vindicate (Roman law), vindictive (English law), vitiate, voidable, voir dire, voluntary, voluntary arrangement, volunteer, voucher (English law, obsolete), wager of law (English legal history), waif (obsolete), waive, waiver, ward, ward of court, warrant, warranty (Contract or Insurance law), waste, will, witness, without prejudice, writ, writ of execution, wrong, year and a day (English law)
Criminal law terms  acquittal, actual bodily harm, arson, bailment, battery, burglary (English law), deception or (formerly) false pretences, embrace, embraceor or embracer, embracery, entry, felon, felonious, felony, force, forgery, grievous bodily harm, hard labour, housebreaking, impeach, indictable, indictment, infamous, malice aforethought, misdemeanant, misdemeanour, penal servitude (English law), perjure, perjury, personate, Riot Act, robbery, suborn, theft, thief, true bill (U.S. law), utter
Property law terms  abatement, abstract of title, abuttals, abutter, accession, ademption, administration, administrator, advancement, adverse, amortize or amortise, appoint, appointee, appointment, appointor, appurtenance, betterment, chattel, chattel personal, chattel real, convey or assure, deforce, demesne, demise, descent, devisee, devisor, dilapidation, disentail, disseise, divest, dominant tenement, dominium or (rare) dominion, easement, ejectment, enfeoff, entail, entry, equity of redemption, estate, fee, fee simple, fee tail, fixture, freehold, freeholder, heir apparent, heir-at-law, heirdom, heirloom, heriditament, hotchpot, intrusion, messuage, mortgagor or mortgager, oust, ouster, particular, partition, party wall, perpetuity, power of appointment, reconvert, remainder, remainderman, remitter, result, reversion, reversioner, revert, riparian, seisin or (U.S.) seizin, servient tenement, severalty, survivor, tail, tenure, transferee, transferor or transferrer, unity of interest, vested, vested interest, warranty
Scots law terms  advocate, Advocate Depute, agent, aliment, alimentary, approbate, approbate and reprobate, arrestment, assignation, assize, avizandum, condescendence, continue, crown agent, culpable homicide, curator, decern, declarator, decreet, defender, delict, depone, desert, district court or (formerly) justice of the peace court, feu, feu duty, fire raising, hypothec, interdict, interlocutor, law agent, location, lockfast, mandate, multiplepoinding, notour, notour bankrupt, not proven, poind, poinding, precognition, procurator fiscal or fiscal, pupil, repetition, repone, sasine, sequestrate, sheriff officer, thirlage, tradition, tutor, wadset, warrant sale

law

noun
1. A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
2. The formal product of a legislative or judicial body:
3. Informal. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop.
Slang: bull, copper, flatfoot, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
4. A broad and basic rule or truth:
verb
To institute or subject to legal proceedings:
Idiom: bring suit.
Translations
قانونقَانُونٌقانون عِلْميالقانون
dretllei
právozákonzákoník
lov=-lovjura
juroleĝo
lakisääntökytät
zakon
Jogtörvény
löglögmál
法律
iuslex
autoritetingai tvirtintibūti linkusiam veikti nenuspėjamu būdudėsnisįstatymais nustatyta tvarkaįstatymiškas
law and orderlikumā paredzētā kārtībalikumilikums
dreptlege
pravozakon
pravilopravozakon
lagrättregel
กฎหมาย
luật

law

[lɔː]
A. N
1. (= piece of legislation) → ley f
there's no law against itno hay ley que lo prohíba
to be a law unto o.s.dictar sus propias leyes
see also pass B9
2. (= system of laws) the lawla ley
it's the lawes la ley
to be above the lawestar por encima de la ley
according to or in accordance with the lawsegún la ley, de acuerdo con la ley
the bill became law on 6th Augustel proyecto de ley se hizo ley el 6 de agosto
by lawpor ley, de acuerdo con la ley
to be required by law to do sthestar obligado por (la) ley a hacer algo
civil/criminal lawderecho m civil/penal
in lawsegún la ley
the law of the landla ley vigente
officer of the lawagente mf de la ley
the law on abortionla legislación sobre el aborto
law and orderel orden público
the forces of law and orderlas fuerzas del orden
he is outside the lawestá fuera de la ley
to have the law on one's sidetener la justicia de su lado
to keep or remain within the lawobrar legalmente
his word is lawsu palabra es ley
to lay down the lawimponer su criterio, obrar autoritariamente
to take the law into one's own handstomarse la justicia por su mano
3. (= field of study) → derecho m
to study lawestudiar derecho
4. (= profession) → abogacía f
she is considering a career in lawestá pensando dedicarse a la abogacía
to practise lawejercer de abogado, ejercer la abogacía
5. (= legal proceedings)
court of lawtribunal m de justicia
to go to lawrecurrir a la justicia or a los tribunales
to take a case to lawllevar un caso ante los tribunales
6. (= rule) [of organization, sport] → regla f
the laws of the gamelas reglas del juego
God's lawla ley de Dios
7. (= standard) → norma f
there seemed to be one law for the rich and another for the poorparecía haber unas normas para los ricos y otras para los pobres
8. (Sci, Math) → ley f
the laws of physicslas leyes de la física
by the law of averagespor la estadística, estadísticamente
the law of gravityla ley de la gravedad
the law of supply and demandla ley de la oferta y la demanda
see also nature A4
9. (= police) the lawla policía
to have the law on sbdenunciar a algn a la policía, llevar a algn a los tribunales
B. CPD law court Ntribunal m de justicia
law enforcement Naplicación f de la ley
law enforcement agency N organismo encargado de velar por el cumplimiento de la ley
law enforcement officer N (esp US) → policía mf
Law Faculty N (Univ) → facultad f de Derecho
law firm Ngabinete m jurídico, bufete m de abogados
Law Lord NPL (Brit) (Pol) → juez mf lor
the Law Lords jueces que son miembros de la Cámara de los Lores y constituyen el Tribunal Supremo
law reports NPLrepertorio m de jurisprudencia
law school N (US) → facultad f de derecho
law student Nestudiante mf de derecho

law

[ˈlɔː]
n
(= system of rules, set of legislation) → loi f
against the law → contraire à la loi
It's against the law → C'est contraire à la loi.
by law → de par la loi
By law restaurants must display their prices
BUT La loi oblige les restaurateurs à afficher leurs prix.Les restaurants sont tenus, de par la loi, à afficher leurs prix
Minicabs are prohibited by law from
BUT La loi interdit aux chauffeurs de minicabs de.
to break the law → enfreindre la loi
to go to law (British) (= take legal action) → aller devant la justice
He went to law and did not succeed in his claim against us → Il est allé devant la justice et sa plainte contre nous a été déboutée.
to be above the law → être au-dessus des lois
to take the law into one's own hands → se faire justice
to lay down the law (= tell other people what they should do) → fixer les règles du jeu company law, criminal law
(= rule, piece of legislation) → loi f
The laws are very strict → Les lois sont très sévères.
to be a law unto o.s. → être son propre juge
[nature, morality] → loi f law of averages
[sport] the laws of the game → les règles du jeu
Match officials should not tolerate such behaviour but instead enforce the laws of the game → Les officiels ne devraient pas tolérer de tels comportements mais plutôt appliquer les règles du jeu.
(= field of study, profession) → droit m
to study law → faire des études de droit
She is studying law → Elle fait des études de droit.law-abiding [ˈlɔːəbaɪdɪŋ] adjrespectueux/euse des loislaw and order nordre m public
people who had no respect for law and order
BUT des gens qui n'avaient aucun respect pour la loi et l'ordre.des gens qui n'avaient aucun respect pour l'ordre public
a breakdown of law and order → des troubles de l'ordre public

law

n
(= rule, also Jewish, Sci) → Gesetz nt; law of natureNaturgesetz nt; it’s the lawdas ist Gesetz; his word is lawsein Wort ist Gesetz; to become lawrechtskräftig werden; to pass a lawein Gesetz verabschieden; is there a law against it?ist das verboten?; there is no law against asking, is there? (inf)man darf doch wohl noch fragen, oder?; he is a law unto himselfer macht, was er will
(= body of laws)Gesetz nt no pl; (= system)Recht nt; according to or in or by or under French lawnach französischem Recht; by lawgesetzlich; by law all restaurants must display their prices outsidealle Restaurants sind gesetzlich dazu verpflichtet, ihre Preise draußen auszuhängen; he is above/outside the lawer steht über dem Gesetz/außerhalb des Gesetzes; what is the law on drugs?wie sind die Drogengesetze?; to keep within the lawsich im Rahmen des Gesetzes bewegen; in lawvor dem Gesetz; ignorance is no defence (Brit) or defense (US) in lawUnwissenheit schützt vor Strafe nicht; a change in the laweine Gesetzesänderung; the law as it relates to propertydie gesetzlichen Bestimmungen über das Eigentum; civil/criminal lawZivil-/Strafrecht nt
(as study) → Jura no art, → Recht (→ swissenschaft f) nt
(Sport) → Regel f; (Art) → Gesetz nt; the laws of harmonydie Harmonielehre; one of the basic laws of harmonyeins der grundlegenden Prinzipien der Harmonielehre
(= operation of law) to practise (Brit) or practice (US) laweine Anwaltspraxis haben; to go to lawvor Gericht gehen, den Rechtsweg beschreiten; to take somebody to lawgegen jdn gerichtlich vorgehen, jdn vor Gericht bringen; to take a case to lawin einer Sache gerichtlich vorgehen, einen Fall vor Gericht bringen; to take the law into one’s own handsdas Recht selbst in die Hand nehmen; law and orderRuhe or Recht und Ordnung, Law and Order; the forces of law and orderdie Ordnungskräfte pl
the law (inf)die Polente (dated inf), → die Bullen (sl); I’ll get the law on you (Brit inf) → ich hole die Polizei; he got the law on to me (Brit inf) → er hat mir die Polizei auf den Hals gehetzt (inf)

law

:
law-abiding
adjgesetzestreu
lawbreaker
nRechtsbrecher(in) m(f)
lawbreaking
adjgesetzesübertretend, rechtsbrecherisch
law centre, (US) law center
n kostenlose Rechtsberatungsstelle
law court
nGerichtshof m, → Gericht nt
law enforcement
n the duty of the police is lawAufgabe der Polizei ist es, dem Gesetz Geltung zu verschaffen
law enforcement authorities
plVollstreckungsbehörden pl
law enforcement officer
nPolizeibeamte(r) m/-beamtin f

law

:
law reports
plEntscheidungs- or Fallsammlung f; (= journal)Gerichtszeitung f
law school
law student
nJurastudent(in) m(f), → Student(in) m(f)der Rechte (form)
lawsuit
nProzess m, → Klage f; he filed a law for damageser strengte eine Schadenersatzklage an; to bring a law against somebodygegen jdn einen Prozess anstrengen

law

[lɔː] nlegge f
law of gravity → legge di gravità
law of constant energy → legge della conservazione dell'energia
against the law → contro la legge
by law → a norma di or per legge
by British law → secondo la legge britannica
civil/criminal law → diritto civile/penale
to study law → studiare giurisprudenza or legge
Faculty of Law → facoltà di giurisprudenza
court of law → corte f di giustizia, tribunale m
to go to law → ricorrere alle vie legali
to have the law on one's side → avere la legge dalla propria (parte)
to be above the law → essere al di sopra della legge
to be a law unto o.s. → non conoscere altra legge che la propria
there's no law against it → nessuna legge lo vieta or impedisce
to take the law into one's own hands → farsi giustizia da sé
his word is law → la sua parola è legge

law

(loː) noun
1. the collection of rules according to which people live or a country etc is governed. Such an action is against the law; law and order.
2. any one of such rules. A new law has been passed by Parliament.
3. (in science) a rule that says that under certain conditions certain things always happen. the law of gravity.
ˈlawful adjective
1. (negative unlawful) allowed by law. He was attacked while going about his lawful business.
2. just or rightful. She is the lawful owner of the property.
ˈlawfully adverb
ˈlawless adjective
paying no attention to, and not keeping, the law. In its early days, the American West was full of lawless men.
ˈlawlessly adverb
ˈlawlessness noun
lawyer (ˈloːjə) noun
a person whose work it is to know about and give advice and help to others concerning the law. If you want to make your will, consult a lawyer.
ˈlaw-abiding adjective
obeying the law. a law- abiding citizen.
law court (also court of law)
a place where people accused of crimes are tried and legal disagreements between people are judged.
ˈlawsuit noun
a quarrel or disagreement taken to a court of law to be settled.
be a law unto oneself
to be inclined not to obey rules or follow the usual customs and conventions.
the law
the police. The thief was still in the building when the law arrived.
the law of the land
the established law of a country.
lay down the law
to state something in a way that indicates that one expects one's opinion and orders to be accepted without argument.

law

قَانُونٌ právo lov Gesetz νόμος ley laki loi zakon legge 法律 wet lov prawo lei закон lag กฎหมาย yasa luật 法律

law

n. ley, regla, norma.
References in classic literature ?
Davis had declared limes a contraband article, and solemnly vowed to publicly ferrule the first person who was found breaking the law.
First come, first served, I suppose is the law of the forest.
The quadroon nurse was looked upon as a huge encumbrance, only good to button up waists and panties and to brush and part hair; since it seemed to be a law of society that hair must be parted and brushed.
Believers in religion, and friends to the law and to the king," returned he who rode foremost.
In even, icy tones the judge continued: "And it is well they should remember that the law is no respecter of persons and that the dignity of this court will be enforced, no matter who the offender may happen to be.
On a pattern like this, by daylight, there is a lack of sequence, a defiance of law, that is a constant irritant to a normal mind.
Applying himself in earlier manhood to the study of the law, and having a natural tendency towards office, he had attained, many years ago, to a judicial situation in some inferior court, which gave him for life the very desirable and imposing title of judge.
His integrity was perfect; it was a law of nature with him, rather than a choice or a principle; nor can it be otherwise than the main condition of an intellect so remarkably clear and accurate as his to be honest and regular in the administration of affairs.
It is true, an old farmer, who had been down to New York on a visit several years after, and from whom this account of the ghostly adventure was received, brought home the intelligence that Ichabod Crane was still alive; that he had left the neighborhood partly through fear of the goblin and Hans Van Ripper, and partly in mortification at having been suddenly dismissed by the heiress; that he had changed his quarters to a distant part of the country; had kept school and studied law at the same time; had been admitted to the bar; turned politician; electioneered; written for the newspapers; and finally had been made a justice of the ten pound court.
What under the heavens he did it for, I cannot tell, but his next movement was to crush himself --boots in hand, and hat on --under the bed; when, from sundry violent gaspings and strainings, I inferred he was hard at work booting himself; though by no law of propriety that I ever heard of, is any man required to be private when putting on his boots.
Thus the most vexatious and violent disputes would often arise between the fishermen, were there not some written or unwritten, universal, undisputed law applicable to all cases.
There is indeed only one law of beauty on which we may rely,--that it invariably breaks all the laws laid down for it by the professors of aesthetics.