law of parsimony


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law of parsimony

Oc′cam's ra′zor


n.
the principle in philosophy and science that assumptions introduced to explain a thing must not be multiplied beyond necessity, and hence the simplest of several hypotheses is always the best in accounting for unexplained facts.
Also called law of parsimony.
[1835–40; after William of Occam]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.law of parsimony - the principle that entities should not be multiplied needlessly; the simplest of two competing theories is to be preferred
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
References in classic literature ?
A little later Norton reminded them of Hamilton's Law of Parsimony, the application of which they immediately claimed for every reasoning process of theirs.
Most conspiracy theorists are tragically ignorant of the law of parsimony.
This principle, also known as the Law of Parsimony, is attributed to William of Ockham, a 14th-century English logician and theologian.