law-abiding

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law-a·bid·ing

(lô′ə-bī′dĭng)
adj.
Adhering to the law.

law-abiding

adj
(Law) adhering more or less strictly to the laws: a law-abiding citizen.
ˈlaw-aˌbidingness n

law′-abid`ing



adj.
abiding by or keeping the law.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.law-abiding - (of individuals) adhering strictly to laws and rules and customs; "law-abiding citizens"; "observant of the speed limit"
lawful - conformable to or allowed by law; "lawful methods of dissent"

law-abiding

adjective obedient, good, peaceful, honourable, orderly, honest, lawful, compliant, dutiful, peaceable We want to protect decent law-abiding people and their property.
Translations

law-abiding

[ˈlɔːəˌbaɪdɪŋ] ADJ (lit) → cumplidor de la ley (fig) → decente

law-abiding

[ˈlɔːəˌbaɪdɪŋ] adjrispettoso/a delle leggi

law

(loː) noun
1. the collection of rules according to which people live or a country etc is governed. Such an action is against the law; law and order.
2. any one of such rules. A new law has been passed by Parliament.
3. (in science) a rule that says that under certain conditions certain things always happen. the law of gravity.
ˈlawful adjective
1. (negative unlawful) allowed by law. He was attacked while going about his lawful business.
2. just or rightful. She is the lawful owner of the property.
ˈlawfully adverb
ˈlawless adjective
paying no attention to, and not keeping, the law. In its early days, the American West was full of lawless men.
ˈlawlessly adverb
ˈlawlessness noun
lawyer (ˈloːjə) noun
a person whose work it is to know about and give advice and help to others concerning the law. If you want to make your will, consult a lawyer.
ˈlaw-abiding adjective
obeying the law. a law- abiding citizen.
law court (also court of law)
a place where people accused of crimes are tried and legal disagreements between people are judged.
ˈlawsuit noun
a quarrel or disagreement taken to a court of law to be settled.
be a law unto oneself
to be inclined not to obey rules or follow the usual customs and conventions.
the law
the police. The thief was still in the building when the law arrived.
the law of the land
the established law of a country.
lay down the law
to state something in a way that indicates that one expects one's opinion and orders to be accepted without argument.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mormons now embrace patriotism and law-abidingness as nearly sacred duties, and among religious groups may be unsurpassed in their devotion to the Constitution.
On that explanation, it is not the case that the citizens are obliged to obey the laws simply because the benefits of law-abidingness are well worth the costs, or simply because the horrors of lawlessness generate a duty of law-abidingness.
This is because it is 'intelligence' (g) which has predictive validity with regard to educational success, socio-economic success, law-abidingness and numerous other important issues.
Where the government allows reasonable mistakes of law by the police, there is a lack of a "reciprocal expectation[] of law-abidingness between government and citizens" where one party does not hold up its "end of the bargain" to adhere to the law.
This is really valuable, and helps increase our international status and stabilize law-abidingness in the country," he added.
The law does not depend so much on an opinion that it is legitimate, as with Weber's types of legitimacy, as it does on plain law-abidingness.
1998) (evidence of pertinent traits of appellant's character offered by the defense, including general GMC and law-abidingness, was admissible but limited to reputation and opinion testimony; in particular, evidence that the good character witnesses had never seen the accused use drugs was not admissible because it was "specific instances" testimony); see also Hargis, supra note 1, at 91; Lieutenant Colonel Stephen R.
Granted, a good IQ score is not the whole story of a person's life--not even close--but it is the entrance requirement for most high-paying jobs, as well as a predictor of marital stability, law-abidingness, civic behavior, and many other positive life outcomes.
American Jewish leaders, for example, responded to the increase in Jewish illegal immigration by walking a fine line between insisting on Jews' inherent law-abidingness and advocating for less stringent application of the quotas.
Such a presumption may be acceptable, as we have seen, in the context of a recidivist premium, which can be understood as a waiver of the presumption of law-abidingness.
They even regard law-abidingness as a disa dvantage.