lawn


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lawn 1

 (lôn)
n.
A plot of grass, usually tended or mowed, as one around a residence or in a park.

[Alteration of Middle English launde, glade, from Old French, heath, pasture, wooded area; see lendh- in Indo-European roots.]

lawn 2

 (lôn)
n.
A light, finely woven, cotton or linen fabric.

[Middle English laun, after Laon, a city of northern France.]

lawn

(lɔːn)
n
1. (Horticulture) a flat and usually level area of mown and cultivated grass
2. (Forestry) an archaic or dialect word for glade
[C16: changed form of C14 launde, from Old French lande, of Celtic origin; compare Breton lann heath; related to land]
ˈlawny adj

lawn

(lɔːn)
n
(Textiles) a fine linen or cotton fabric, used for clothing
[C15: probably from Laon, a town in France where linen was made]
ˈlawny adj

lawn1

(lɔn)

n.
1. a stretch of open, grass-covered land, esp. one closely mowed, as near a house, on an estate, or in a park.
2. Archaic. a glade.
[1250–1300; Middle English launde < Middle French lande glade < Celtic]

lawn2

(lɔn)

n.
a sheer, plain-weave linen or cotton fabric, bleached, dyed, or printed.
[1375–1425; late Middle English lawnd, laun, perhaps after the French city of Laon, once a linen-making center]
lawn′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lawn - a field of cultivated and mowed grasslawn - a field of cultivated and mowed grass
field - a piece of land cleared of trees and usually enclosed; "he planted a field of wheat"
Translations
مَخْضَرَهمَرْجٌ
trávník
græsplæne
nurmikko
travnjak
gyeppázsit
grasflöt
芝生
잔디밭
veja
mauriņšzāliens
trata
travnjak
gräsmatta
สนามหญ้า
bãi cỏ

lawn

1 [lɔːn]
A. Ncésped m, pasto m (LAm)
B. CPD lawn tennis Ntenis m sobre hierba

lawn

2 [lɔːn] N (= cloth) → linón m

lawn

[ˈlɔːn] npelouse f

lawn

:
lawn chair
nLiegestuhl m
lawn mower
nRasenmäher m
lawn party
n (US) → Gartenfest nt, → Gartenparty f; (for charity) → Wohltätigkeitsveranstaltung fim Freien
lawn tennis
nRasentennis nt

lawn

1
n (= grass)Rasen m no pl; the lawns in front of the housesder Rasen vor den Häusern

lawn

2
n (Tex) → Batist m, → Linon m

lawn

1 [lɔːn] nprato all'inglese

lawn

2 [lɔːn] n (fabric) → batista

lawn

(loːn) noun
an area of smooth, short grass, especially as part of a garden. He is mowing the lawn.

lawn

مَرْجٌ trávník græsplæne Rasen γρασίδι césped nurmikko pelouse travnjak prato 芝生 잔디밭 gazon gressplen trawnik gramado, relvado лужайка gräsmatta สนามหญ้า çim alan bãi cỏ 草坪
References in classic literature ?
Yet it seemed a lonely, lifeless sort of house, for no children frolicked on the lawn, no motherly face ever smiled at the windows, and few people went in and out, except the old gentleman and his grandson.
As they were returning to Main Street they passed the little lawn beside the railroad station and saw Wash Williams apparently asleep on the grass beneath a tree.
Most Black Hawk fathers had no personal habits outside their domestic ones; they paid the bills, pushed the baby-carriage after office hours, moved the sprinkler about over the lawn, and took the family driving on Sunday.
When La Folle came to the broad stretch of velvety lawn that surrounded the house, she moved slowly and with delight over the springy turf, that was delicious beneath her tread.
In the array of funerals, too -- whether for the apparel of the dead body, or to typify, by manifold emblematic devices of sable cloth and snowy lawn, the sorrow of the survivors -- there was a frequent and characteristic demand for such labour as Hester Prynne could supply.
I remember the time and the place--the corner of the lawn, the shade of the great beeches and the long, hot summer afternoon.
At the distance of a mile or two from the village we came to a pretty, low house, with a lawn and shrubbery at the front and a drive up to the door.
So, with great vehemence, he overturned Sam, and, giving two or three contemptuous snorts, flourished his heels vigorously in the air, and was soon prancing away towards the lower end of the lawn, followed by Bill and Jerry, whom Andy had not failed to let loose, according to contract, speeding them off with various direful ejaculations.
Highbury, the large and populous village, almost amounting to a town, to which Hartfield, in spite of its separate lawn, and shrubberies, and name, did really belong, afforded her no equals.
It had no park, but the pleasure-grounds were tolerably extensive; and like every other place of the same degree of importance, it had its open shrubbery, and closer wood walk, a road of smooth gravel winding round a plantation, led to the front, the lawn was dotted over with timber, the house itself was under the guardianship of the fir, the mountain-ash, and the acacia, and a thick screen of them altogether, interspersed with tall Lombardy poplars, shut out the offices.
Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near a scene of wet lawn and storm-beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast.
He crossed the lawn and turned into the Long Walk by the ivied walls.