laxist


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laxist

(ˈlæksɪst)
n
(Theology) (in Roman Catholic theology) a casuist who believes that, in cases of doubt in moral matters, the more liberal course should always be followed
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Let me remind the prime minister that the war being waged against France today is being waged by Islamist fundamentalists bottle-fed by a laxist, sectarian Socialist Party," she said.
Supported by the papacy (which in 1679 condemned some laxist propositions) and by a minority network of Jesuits, he developed a new system called "probabiliorism": a more rigorous method to discern the solution for ethical issues.
but the richness of Calderon's critique lies in the portrayal of the exculpation of a moral rigorist by a moral laxist [.
If the generalization that wealthier Christians lapsed while poorer Christians remained faithful has a degree of truth to it, then we must understand the laxist position on the readmission of the lapsi not only in theological terms but in socioeconomic terms as well.
The ultimate failure of the laxist community in Carthage occurred because those who had been supporting the rebellious clergy, unlike those clergy themselves, did not want to see the establishment of a rival community; they wanted to be reconciled to the community to which they had belonged.
132) Critics also find the law too laxist since the Swedish penal code carries a maximum sentence of four years imprisonment for sexual intercourse with a minor under the age of 15.
There is an ambiguity in the evidence for the stance taken by the predecessors of Miltiades at Rome on the matter of those Christians who had lapsed during the persecution: did Marcellus and Eusebius favour a laxist or rigorist policy on the question of readmission to the church?
For instance, last year we saw Julia Fleming's noteworthy manuscript on the probabilist Juan Caramuel, long dismissed as an irrelevant laxist.
Cyprian wanted to provide Cornelius a list of legitimate African bishops (16) and to inform him about, among other things, developments with regard to Fortunatus, the rival laxist bishop in Carthage appointed by Privatus, the deposed bishop of Lambaesis.
For example, Pope Innocent XI in 1679 condemned as laxist the view that it is permissible for a servant to carry the ladder or open a window to facilitate his master's rape of a virgin.
Both accused the other of laxist attitudes, the Catholics attacking the Lutherans for their seeming opposition to integrity, the Lutherans denouncing Catholics on the sufficiency of attrition (in contrast to contrition) within the sacrament.
From the United States, Julia Fleming studies the so-called "prince of laxists," the 17th-century Spanish Cistercian Juan Caramuel.