layoff


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lay·off

 (lā′ôf′, -ŏf′)
n.
1. The act of suspending or dismissing an employee, as for lack of work or because of corporate reorganization.
2. A period of temporary inactivity or rest.

layoff

(ˈleɪɒf)
n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a dismissal; redundancy
2. a period of inactivity

lay•off

(ˈleɪˌɔf, -ˌɒf)

n.
1. the act of dismissing employees, esp. temporarily.
2. a period of enforced unemployment.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.layoff - the act of laying off an employee or a work forcelayoff - the act of laying off an employee or a work force
closedown, shutdown, closing, closure - termination of operations; "they regretted the closure of the day care center"

layoff

noun unemployment, firing (informal), sacking (informal), dismissal, discharge The closure will result in layoffs of an estimated 2000 employees.
Translations

layoff

[ˈleɪɒf] nlicenciement m
References in periodicals archive ?
As we noted, the impact of layoffs, rather than layoff activities per se, is a more powerful predictor of harmful outcomes, suggesting that reducing the impact is an important component of successful coping.
If the layoff lasts more than 31 days, it is designated an extended mass layoff.
Specifically, for the year after a layoff occurs, CEOs of the 229 firms studied received 22.
A UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS finance professor has released results of a study that shows how chief executive officers are rewarded for layoff decisions.
Layoff notices were sent to about two dozen teachers.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, downsizing activities in the United States have exceeded two million job cuts in both 2001 and 2002 ("Mass Layoff Statistics," 2002).
The union had earlier filed a lawsuit against the airline to prevent the airline management from executing an illegal process in the involuntary layoff of 552 attendants, which would allegedly break the collective bargaining agreement between the Association of Flight Attendants and US Airways.
However, because it is not economically feasible to keep the mine running at the same level, a newly revised plan was developed that included layoffs to begin by year-end 2003, with another similar layoff to be expected in 2005.
You can't make job determinations - including layoff decisions - based on an employee's age, race or other protected classification.
One HR manager said that bosses making layoff decisions go first for the loners because getting rid of them does no damage to the body politic.
And second, under the new law, notice is required for mass layoffs of 50 employees within a 30-day period even if the layoff does not involve one-third of the workforce.