lead arsenate


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lead arsenate

 (lĕd)
n.
A poisonous white crystalline compound, Pb3(AsO4)2, used in insecticides and herbicides.

lead arsenate

n
(Elements & Compounds) a white insoluble toxic crystalline powder used as an insecticide and fungicide. Formula: Pb3(AsO4)2

lead′ ar′senate

(lɛd)
n.
a white, crystalline, water-insoluble, highly poisonous powder, PbHAsO4, used as an insecticide.
[1900–05]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lead arsenate - a poisonous white solid (Pb3[AsO4]2) used as an insecticide
insect powder, insecticide - a chemical used to kill insects
References in periodicals archive ?
Historical use of lead arsenate insecticides, resulting soil contamination, and implications for soil remediation.
They cover linear and non-linear optical phenomena, luminescence and time-resolved emission spectra of Nd3+ and Er3+: silver zinc borate glasses, spectral features of lead arsenate glasses doped with copper oxide, dielectric studies on alkali borate glasses mixed with iron oxide, a case study of treating a large cystic lesion in the anterior maxilla using glass reinforced hydroxyapatite, and guided bone regeneration using glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite and collagen membrane in treating peri-implantitis.
Dow, The Dow Chemical Company entered the agricultural market in 1910, offering lime sulfur (calcium sulfide) and lead arsenate sprays to farm chemical businesses.
3-man wooden showers, 4-seater latrines with dizzy flies that drop dead over lead arsenate bait, burning-out crappers, one wringer washing machine for 140 troops .
They're still finding canisters of DDT (which was banned in 1972) and lead arsenate (which fell out of favor when DDT came on the scene in 1948) dating back more than 50 years.
The crude OR for ever versus never use of lead arsenate was 2.
Phosphate-enhanced movement of arsenic out of lead arsenate contaminated topsoil and through uncontaminated subsoil.
A study of the relative toxicity of the molecular components of lead arsenate.