leaf miner

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leaf miner

n.
Any of numerous insects, especially moths and flies, that in the larval stage burrow into and feed on the internal tissue of leaves.

leaf miner

n
1. (Animals) any of various insect larvae that bore into and feed on leaf tissue, esp the larva of dipterous flies of the genus Philophylla (family Trypetidae) and the caterpillar of moths of the family Gracillariidae
2. (Animals) the adult insect of any of these larvae

leaf′ min`er


n.
any of various insect larvae, including small caterpillars, that tunnel into leaves and stems, leaving winding trails or broad blotches of pale tissue.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leaf miner - any of various small moths or dipterous flies whose larvae burrow into and feed on leaf tissue especially of the family Gracilariidaeleaf miner - any of various small moths or dipterous flies whose larvae burrow into and feed on leaf tissue especially of the family Gracilariidae
insect - small air-breathing arthropod
References in periodicals archive ?
Roger Smith, via email LEAF miners are the culprits.
Then you will only have to watch out for Asian Citrus leaf Miners, which burrow inside the leaves, Mediterranean Fruit Flies and other pesky insects that would spoil your fruits, if you let them.
The flies were found preying on whiteflies, psyllids, fungus gnats, leaf miners, and vinegar flies in greenhouses with organic vegetable production.
The insects that may attack beets are flea beetles, leaf miners, aphids, Cercospora leaf spot, scab and root rot.
Although the predisposition effect of leaf miners on the increment of Alternaria spot disease was previously published for tomato (DURAIRAJ et al.
If you tend to have problems with flea beetles, root maggots, leaf miners or cabbage worms, cover the soil immediately after planting.
The vast majority of studies published on leaf miners focus on northern hemisphere species.
Coleoptera: Elateridae) on the leaves in the spring, and leaf miners (Lepidoptera) in the winter.
The hatchling caterpillars feed initially as leaf miners in the foliage and then bore into the stems of leeks, leaving the centres looking shredded and mushy.
And if leaf miners are really hammering new growth, a little Monterey Garden Insect Spray.
On young trees, however, there is more of a concern, especially since leaf miners do damage exclusively to young, expanding leaves in new flushes of growth.
Example topics are gall-inducing scale insects, the phylogeny of gall midges, dipteran leaf miners, the biology and evolution of braconid gall wasps, and gall flies on Myrtaceae as a mutualistic association between flies and nematodes.