leap


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

leap

 (lēp)
v. leaped or leapt (lĕpt, lēpt), leap·ing, leaps
v.intr.
1.
a. To propel oneself quickly upward or a long way; spring or jump: The goat leaped over the wall. The salmon leapt across the barrier.
b. To move quickly or suddenly: leaped out of his chair to answer the door.
2.
a. To change quickly or abruptly from one condition or subject to another: always leaping to conclusions.
b. To act quickly or impulsively: leaped at the opportunity to travel.
c. To enter eagerly into an activity; plunge: leapt into the project with both feet.
v.tr.
1. To propel oneself over: I couldn't leap the brook.
2. To cause to leap: She leapt her horse over the hurdle.
n.
1.
a. The act of leaping; a jump.
b. A place jumped over or from.
c. The distance cleared in a leap.
2. An abrupt or precipitous passage, shift, or transition: a leap from rags to riches.
Phrasal Verb:
leap out
To be readily noticed: The sign leapt out at us from the window.
Idioms:
by leaps and bounds
Very quickly: growing by leaps and bounds.
leap in the dark
An act whose consequences cannot be predicted.
leap of faith
The act or an instance of believing or trusting in something intangible or incapable of being proved.

[Middle English lepen, from Old English hlēapan.]

leap′er n.

leap

(liːp)
vb, leaps, leaping, leapt or leaped
1. (intr) to jump suddenly from one place to another
2. (often foll by: at) to move or react quickly
3. (tr) to jump over
4. to come into prominence rapidly: the thought leapt into his mind.
5. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (tr) to cause (an animal, esp a horse) to jump a barrier
n
6. the act of jumping
7. a spot from which a leap was or may be made
8. the distance of a leap
9. an abrupt change or increase
10. (Music, other) music Also called (US and Canadian): skip a relatively large melodic interval, esp in a solo part
11. a leap in the dark an action performed without knowledge of the consequences
12. by leaps and bounds with unexpectedly rapid progress
[Old English hlēapan; related to Gothic hlaupan, German laufen]
ˈleaper n

leap

(lip)

v. leaped or leapt (lɛpt, lipt) leap•ing, v.i.
1. to spring through the air from one point or position to another; jump: to leap over a ditch.
2. to move or act quickly or suddenly: to leap aside; to leap at an opportunity.
3. to pass, come, rise, etc., as if with a jump: an idea leaped to mind.
v.t.
4. to pass over by or as if by jumping: to leap a fence.
5. to cause to leap: to leap a horse.
n.
6. a spring, jump, or bound; light, springing movement.
7. the distance covered in a leap; distance jumped.
8. a place leaped or to be leaped over or from.
9. an abrupt transition: a successful leap to stardom.
10. a sudden and decisive increase: a leap in profits.
Idioms:
1. by leaps and bounds, very rapidly.
2. leap in the dark, an action that risks unpredictable consequences.
3. leap of faith, an act or instance of accepting or trusting in something that cannot readily be seen or proved.
[before 900; Middle English lepen, Old English hlēapan, c. Old Saxon hlōpan, Old High German hloufan, Old Norse hlaupa, Gothic us-hlaupan]
leap′er, n.

Leap

 of leopards: a company of leopards—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486; of bandilleros—Lipton, 1970.

leap


Past participle: leaped/leapt
Gerund: leaping

Imperative
leap
leap
Present
I leap
you leap
he/she/it leaps
we leap
you leap
they leap
Preterite
I leaped/leapt
you leaped/leapt
he/she/it leaped/leapt
we leaped/leapt
you leaped/leapt
they leaped/leapt
Present Continuous
I am leaping
you are leaping
he/she/it is leaping
we are leaping
you are leaping
they are leaping
Present Perfect
I have leaped/leapt
you have leaped/leapt
he/she/it has leaped/leapt
we have leaped/leapt
you have leaped/leapt
they have leaped/leapt
Past Continuous
I was leaping
you were leaping
he/she/it was leaping
we were leaping
you were leaping
they were leaping
Past Perfect
I had leaped/leapt
you had leaped/leapt
he/she/it had leaped/leapt
we had leaped/leapt
you had leaped/leapt
they had leaped/leapt
Future
I will leap
you will leap
he/she/it will leap
we will leap
you will leap
they will leap
Future Perfect
I will have leaped/leapt
you will have leaped/leapt
he/she/it will have leaped/leapt
we will have leaped/leapt
you will have leaped/leapt
they will have leaped/leapt
Future Continuous
I will be leaping
you will be leaping
he/she/it will be leaping
we will be leaping
you will be leaping
they will be leaping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been leaping
you have been leaping
he/she/it has been leaping
we have been leaping
you have been leaping
they have been leaping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been leaping
you will have been leaping
he/she/it will have been leaping
we will have been leaping
you will have been leaping
they will have been leaping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been leaping
you had been leaping
he/she/it had been leaping
we had been leaping
you had been leaping
they had been leaping
Conditional
I would leap
you would leap
he/she/it would leap
we would leap
you would leap
they would leap
Past Conditional
I would have leaped/leapt
you would have leaped/leapt
he/she/it would have leaped/leapt
we would have leaped/leapt
you would have leaped/leapt
they would have leaped/leapt
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leap - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwardsleap - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards
jumping, jump - the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected"
capriole, caper - a playful leap or hop
pounce - the act of pouncing
2.leap - an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues"
transition - a change from one place or state or subject or stage to another
quantum jump - (physics) an abrupt transition of an electron or atom or molecule from one quantum state to another with the emission or absorption of a quantum
3.leap - a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance"
increase - a change resulting in an increase; "the increase is scheduled for next month"
quantum leap, quantum jump - a sudden large increase or advance; "this may not insure success but it will represent a quantum leap from last summer"
4.leap - the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet"
distance - the property created by the space between two objects or points
elevation - (ballet) the height of a dancer's leap or jump; "a dancer of exceptional elevation"
Verb1.leap - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
pronk - jump straight up; "kangaroos pronk"
bounce, rebound, ricochet, take a hop, resile, spring, recoil, bound, reverberate - spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"
burst - move suddenly, energetically, or violently; "He burst out of the house into the cool night"
bounce - leap suddenly; "He bounced to his feet"
capriole - perform a capriole, of horses in dressage
galumph - move around heavily and clumsily; "the giant tortoises galumphed around in their pen"
ski jump - jump on skis
saltate - leap or skip, often in dancing; "These fish swim with a saltating motion"
vault - bound vigorously
leapfrog - jump across; "He leapfrogged his classmates"
vault, overleap - jump across or leap over (an obstacle)
curvet - perform a leap where both hind legs come off the ground, of a horse
hop, hop-skip, skip - jump lightly
caper - jump about playfully
hop - make a jump forward or upward
jump out, leap out, stand out, stick out, jump - be highly noticeable
2.leap - pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion"; "jump from one thing to another"
switch, change, shift - lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; "switch to a different brand of beer"; "She switched psychiatrists"; "The car changed lanes"
3.leap - jump down from an elevated point; "the parachutist didn't want to jump"; "every year, hundreds of people jump off the Golden Gate bridge"; "the widow leapt into the funeral pyre"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
4.leap - cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop"

leap

verb
1. jump, spring, bound, bounce, hop, skip, caper, cavort, frisk, gambol The newsreels show him leaping into the air.
2. vault, clear, jump, bound, spring He leapt over a wall brandishing a weapon.
3. hurry, race, rush, hasten, move quickly She leapt forward to take control of the situation.
4. rush, jump, come, reach, arrive at, hurry, hasten, form hastily People should not leap to conclusions and blame the pilot.
5. increase, advance, soar, surge, rocket, escalate, shoot up They leapt to third in the table, 31 points behind the leaders.
noun
1. jump, spring, bound, hop, skip, vault, caper, frisk He took Britain's fifth medal with a leap of 2.37 metres.
2. rise, change, increase, soaring, surge, escalation, upsurge, upswing The result has been a giant leap in productivity.
leap at something accept eagerly, seize on, jump at They leapt at the chance of a cheap holiday in Italy.

leap

verb
1. To move off the ground by a muscular effort of the legs and feet:
2. To move in a lively way:
noun
1. The act of jumping:
2. A sudden lively movement:
Translations
قَفْزَه، وَثْبَهيَثِبُيَقْفِزيَقْفِز فوقيَنْدَفِع بِشَوْق، يَقْفِزُ فَرَحاً
skočitskokpřeskočit
springehoppespring
hypähtää
skočiti
stökkstökkvastökkva á, hlaupa í faîminn ástökkva yfir
跳ねる
뛰다
avinaskeliamieji metainepaprastai sparčiai
lēcienslēkātlēktpārlēktsteigties/mesties
skočitiskok
språng
กระโดด
sıçramaküstünden atlamakzıplamazıplamakatılmak
nhảy

leap

[liːp] (leaped or leapt (vb: pp, pt))
A. N
1. (= jump)
1.1. (lit) → salto m; (showing exuberance) → salto m, brinco m
1.2. (fig) → salto m
by leaps and boundsa pasos agigantados
a leap in the darkun salto al vacío
his heart gave a leaple dio un vuelco el corazón
it doesn't take a great leap of the imagination to foresee what will happenno se requiere un gran esfuerzo de imaginación para prever lo que va a pasar
she successfully made the leap into filmsdio el salto con éxito al mundo del cine
to make or take a huge leap forwarddar un gran salto or paso hacia adelante
to make or take a leap of faithhacer un gran esfuerzo de fe, hacer profesión de fe
mental leapsalto m mental
a leap into the unknownun salto a lo desconocido
2. (= increase) → subida f
a 6% leap in profitsuna subida de un 6% en las ganancias
B. VI
1. (= jump)
1.1. (lit) → saltar; (exuberantly) → brincar, saltar
to leap aboutdar saltos, brincar
to leap about with excitementdar saltos or brincar de emoción
the dog leaped at the man, snarlingel perro saltó or se arrojó sobre el hombre gruñiendo
he leapt down from his horsese bajó del caballo de un salto
the car leapt forwardel coche dio una sacudida
he leapt from a moving trainsaltó de un tren en marcha
he leaped into the riversaltó or se tiró al río
he leapt off/onto the busbajó del/subió al autobús de un salto
he suddenly leapt on top of mede repente me saltó or se me tiró encima
to leap out of a carbajarse or saltar de un coche
she leapt out of bedse levantó de la cama de un salto, saltó de la cama
to leap over [+ obstacle] → saltar por encima de; [+ stream] → cruzar de un salto
to leap to one's feetlevantarse de un salto
1.2. (fig) my heart leapedme dio un vuelco el corazón
she leapt at the chance to play the partno dejó escapar la oportunidad de representar el papel
to leap at an offeraceptar una oferta al vuelo
he leapt on my mistakese lanzó sobre mi error
the tabloids are quick to leap on such casesla prensa amarilla está a la que salta con estos casos
the headline leapt out at herel titular le saltó a la vista
he leapt to his brother's defenceenseguida saltó a defender a su hermano
2. (= increase) sales leapt by one thirdlas ventas se incrementaron repentinamente en un tercio
C. VT [+ fence, ditch] → saltar por encima de; [+ stream, river] → cruzar de un salto
D. CPD leap year Naño m bisiesto
leap up VI + ADV
1. [person] → levantarse de un salto; [flame] → subir
the dog leapt up at himel perro le saltó or se le echó encima
2. (= increase) [profits, sales, prices, unemployment] → subir de repente

leap

[ˈliːp]
vi [leaped or leapt] (pt, pp)
(= jump) [person] → sauter
They leapt over the stream → Ils ont sauté par dessus le ruisseau.
(= move quickly)
He leapt out of his chair when his team scored → Il s'est levé d'un bond lorsque son équipe a marqué.
The car leapt forward → La voiture fit un bond en avant.
to leap into a taxi → sauter dans un taxi
(FINANCE) [stocks, shares] → faire un bond
The shares leapt 10p to 98p → Les actions ont fait un bond de 10 pence pour atteindre 98 pence.
[flames] → s'élancer
Huge flames leapt into the air → D'immenses flammes s'élançaient dans les airs.
my heart leapt (with joy)mon cœur s'emplit de joie; (with fear)mon cœur se serra
His heart leapt at the thought of seeing her → Son cœur s'emplit de joie à la pensée de la voir.
n
(= jump) → bond m, saut m
a leap in the dark → un saut dans l'inconnu
in leaps and bounds, by leaps and bounds → à pas de géant
He's improved in leaps and bounds this season → Il a progressé à pas de géant cette saison.
(= increase) (in productivity)bond m en avant
a leap in productivity → un bond en avant de la productivité
He blamed the leap in prices for their problems → Il a mis leurs problèmes au compte de la flambée des prix.
leap at
vt fus
to leap at an offer → sauter sur une offre
to leap at the chance → sauter sur l'occasion
A teaching post became vacant and he leapt at the chance → Un poste d'enseignant se libéra et il sauta sur l'occasion.
leap up
vi
[person] (= jump upwards) → sauter d'un bond (= get up quickly) → se lever d'un bond
He leapt up onto the table → Il sauta d'un bond sur la table.
He leapt up from his desk → Il se leva de son bureau d'un bond.
[prices] → flamber
to leap up by 10% → bondir de 10%

leap

vb: pret, ptp <leapt (esp Brit) or leaped>
nSprung m, → Satz m (inf); (fig: in profits, unemployment etc) → sprunghafter Anstieg; in one leapmit einem Satz; to take a leapeinen Satz machen; a great leap forward (fig)ein großer Sprung nach vorn; a leap into the unknown, a leap in the dark (fig)ein Sprung ins Ungewisse; a leap of imagination is neededman braucht viel Fantasie or Phantasie; by or in leaps and bounds (fig)sprunghaft
vtspringen or setzen über (+acc); he leapt the horse across the ditcher ließ das Pferd über den Graben springen
vispringen; my heart leaped (with joy)mein Herz hüpfte vor Freude (geh), → mein Herz machte vor Freude einen Sprung; to leap aboutherumspringen; to leap for joyvor Freude hüpfen, Freudensprünge machen; try to leap over to the other sideversuch mal, auf die andere Seite zu springen; to leap to one’s feetaufspringen; he leapt to her assistanceer sprang ihr zu Hilfe; the shares leapt by 21pdie Aktien stiegen mit einem Sprung um 21 Pence ? also look

leap

[liːp] (leaped or leapt (vb: pp, pt))
1. visaltare, balzare
he leapt into/out of the train → saltò sul/giù dal treno
to leap to one's feet → scattare in piedi
to leap about → saltellare qua e là
to leap out → saltare fuori
to leap out at sb → saltare addosso a qn
to leap over sth → saltare qc con un balzo
my heart leapt → ho avuto un tuffo al cuore
to leap at an offer → afferrare al volo una proposta
2. vt (fence, ditch) → saltare
3. nsalto, balzo
a leap in the dark (fig) → un salto nel buio
by leaps and bounds → a passi da gigante
leap up vi + adv (person) → balzare in piedi; (flames) → divampare

leap

(liːp) past tense, past participles leapt (lept) , (especially American) leaped verb
1. to jump. He leapt into the boat.
2. to jump over. The dog leapt the wall.
3. to rush eagerly. She leaped into his arms.
noun
an act of leaping. The cat jumped from the roof and reached the ground in two leaps.
ˈleap-frog noun
a game in which one person vaults over another's bent back, pushing off from his hands.
leap year
every fourth year, which consists of 366 days, February having 29, ie 1996, 2000, 2004 etc.
by leaps and bounds
extremely rapidly and successfully. improving by leaps and bounds.

leap

يَثِبُ skočit springe springen αναπηδώ saltar hypähtää bondir skočiti saltare 跳ねる 뛰다 springen hoppe przeskoczyć saltar прыгать språng กระโดด sıçramak nhảy
References in classic literature ?
Timidly she crept from her lattice, put her hand on Roderigo's shoulder, and was about to leap gracfully down when "Alas
She wanted to leap and run, to cry out, to find some other lonely human and embrace him.
Then with a great coughing, sighing snarl the beast reared up, gave a convulsive leap forward toward its newly discovered enemies, and fell dead in a limp heap, just beyond the native over which it had been crouching before it delivered the death stroke, now never to fall.
While we were lying there against the warm bank, a little insect of the palest, frailest green hopped painfully out of the buffalo grass and tried to leap into a bunch of bluestem.
It was very remarkable into what prominent relief--even as if a dim picture should leap suddenly from its canvas--Clifford's character was thrown by this apparently trifling annoyance.
I felt a sick swim at the drop of my victory and all the return of my battle, so that the wildness of my veritable leap only served as a great betrayal.
The schooner was run into the wind, and while the hands were clearing away the stern boat, Queequeg, stripped to the waist, darted from the side with a long living arc of a leap.
And for years afterwards, perhaps, ships shun the place; leaping over it as silly sheep leap over a vacuum, because their leader originally leaped there when a stick was held.
One day when John and I had been out on some business of our master's, and were returning gently on a long, straight road, at some distance we saw a boy trying to leap a pony over a gate; the pony would not take the leap, and the boy cut him with the whip, but he only turned off on one side.
The company takes up the choruses, and men and women cry out like all possessed; some leap to their feet and stamp upon the floor, lifting their glasses and pledging each other.
Right on behind they came; and, nerved with strength such as God gives only to the desperate, with one wild cry and flying leap, she vaulted sheer over the turbid current by the shore, on to the raft of ice beyond.
Nor were we NAPPERSOCKET in our expectation; the water was roaring down its leap of two hundred and fifty feet in a most magnificent frenzy, while the trees which cling to its rocky sides swayed to and fro in the violence of the hurricane which it brought down with it; even the stream, which falls into the main cascade at right angles, and TOUTEFOIS forms a beautiful feature in the scene, was now swollen into a raging torrent; and the violence of this "meeting of the waters," about fifty feet below the frail bridge where we stood, was fearfully grand.