leatherback

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Related to leatherbacks: Leatherback Sea Turtle

leath·er·back

 (lĕth′ər-băk′)
n.
A very large sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) of tropical and subtropical waters worldwide, having a tough, leathery carapace with seven longitudinal ridges.

leatherback

(ˈlɛðəˌbæk)
n
(Animals) a large turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, of warm and tropical seas, having a ridged leathery carapace: family Dermochelidae. Also called (in Britain): leathery turtle
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leatherback - wide-ranging marine turtle with flexible leathery carapaceleatherback - wide-ranging marine turtle with flexible leathery carapace; largest living turtle
marine turtle, sea turtle - any of various large turtles with limbs modified into flippers; widely distributed in warm seas
Dermochelys, genus Dermochelys - type genus of the Dermochelyidae: leatherback turtles
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
They also will work with Costa Rican teachers and students to increase their ecological knowledge so they can better understand their role in the long term survival of leatherbacks and conservation in general.
Galibi is situated in the estuary zone of the Marowijne River and plays a key role in the conservation of Leatherback and Green Seaturtles; the Galibi beaches are the largest nesting sites for leatherbacks.
Scientists initially believed the turtles had to feed at their nesting sites too, but recent physiology research has suggested that leatherbacks nesting in French Guiana are fasting and living on stored energy.
Leatherbacks have been observed throughout Florida's nearshore and offshore waters (Stewart and Johnson, 2006).
It is important to protect leatherbacks in these foraging areas so that our nesting beach conservation efforts can be effective," Tapilatu said.
That is normal behavior for healthy leatherbacks that had been handled during the research field work.
Trinidad has a long history of successful conservation of leatherbacks thanks to the vocal efforts of rural citizens.
Leatherbacks can grow to more than 7 feet long, weigh up to a ton, and can live to 100 years.
Leatherbacks, the largest sea turtle species, are among the most critically endangered due to a combination of historical and ongoing threats including egg poaching at nesting beaches and juvenile and adult turtles being caught in fishing operations.
Loggerheads, green sea turtles and leatherbacks are making a comeback.
The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) said there have already been a dozen sightings of giant leatherbacks off the UK's coast this year, compared to a recent average of around 20 turtles a summer.
Years of excessive exploitation of eggs and nesting females, combined with the incidental take of leatherbacks by drift net (1) fisheries in the North Pacific, coastal gill nets (2), and longline fisheries (3), contributed to the crash of this population.