leaving


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leave 1

 (lēv)
v. left (lĕft), leav·ing, leaves
v.tr.
1. To go out of or away from: not allowed to leave the room.
2.
a. To go without taking or removing: left my book on the bus.
b. To omit or exclude: left out the funniest part of the story.
3. To have as a result, consequence, or remainder: The car left a trail of exhaust fumes. Two from eight leaves six.
4. To cause or allow to be or remain in a specified state: left the lights on.
5.
a. To have remaining after death: left a young son.
b. To bequeath: left her money to charity.
6. To give over to another to control or act on: Leave all the details to us.
7.
a. To abandon or forsake: leave home; left her husband.
b. To remove oneself from association with or participation in: left the navy for civilian life.
8.
a. To give or deposit, as for use or information, upon one's departure or in one's absence: He left a note for you. Leave your name and address.
b. To cause or permit to be or remain: left myself plenty of time.
9. Nonstandard To allow or permit; let.
v.intr.
To set out or depart; go: When can you leave?
Phrasal Verb:
leave off
1. To stop; cease.
2. To stop doing or using.
Idioms:
leave/let alone
To refrain from disturbing or interfering.
leave no stone unturned
To make every possible effort.

[Middle English leaven, from Old English lǣfan; see leip- in Indo-European roots.]

leav′er n.
Usage Note: In formal writing leave is not an acceptable substitute for let in the sense "to allow or permit." Thus in the following examples, only let should be used: Let me be. Let him go. Let us not quarrel. This use of leave is normally edited out of written prose but remains common in speech. · Leave alone is an acceptable substitute for let alone in the sense "to refrain from disturbing or interfering with." As far back as 1968, a majority of the Usage Panel approved the following example: Leave him alone, and he will produce. Some people feel that leave alone should mean simply "to depart from someone who remains in solitude," as in They were left alone in the wilderness. There is no harm in observing this restriction, but expecting it of others is unrealistic.

leave 2

 (lēv)
n.
1. Permission to do something. See Synonyms at permission.
2. An act of departing; a farewell: took leave of her with a heavy heart.

[Middle English leve, from Old English lēafe, dative and accusative of lēaf; see leubh- in Indo-European roots.]

leave 3

 (lēv)
intr.v. leaved, leav·ing, leaves
To put forth foliage; leaf.

[Middle English leaven, from leaf, leaf; see leaf.]

leaving

(ˈliːvɪŋ)
n
a departure

leav•ing

(ˈli vɪŋ)

n.
1. something that is left; residue.
2. leavings, leftovers or remains; refuse.
[1300–50]

leaving

  • drawing room - A shortening of withdrawing room, the room to which the ladies withdrew, leaving the men to smoking and drinking.
  • egression - The action of going out or leaving a place.
  • bequeath - Etymologically, what you bequeath is what you "say" you will leave someone in your will—but the original sense "say, utter" died out, leaving the legal sense.
  • exclaustration - Being expelled from or leaving a religious retreat; it is also the return to secular life by someone who has been released from their religious vows.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leaving - the act of departingleaving - the act of departing      
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
breaking away - departing hastily
leave-taking, parting, farewell, leave - the act of departing politely; "he disliked long farewells"; "he took his leave"; "parting is such sweet sorrow"
French leave - an abrupt and unannounced departure (without saying farewell)
disappearance, disappearing - the act of leaving secretly or without explanation
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
sailing - the departure of a vessel from a port
boarding, embarkation, embarkment - the act of passengers and crew getting aboard a ship or aircraft
exit - the act of going out
dispatch, shipment, despatch - the act of sending off something
takeoff - a departure; especially of airplanes
Translations

leaving

[ˈliːvɪŋ]
A. N (= departure) → salida f
B. CPD [ceremony, present] → de despedida

leaving

nFortgang m, → Weggang m; leaving was very difficult (for him)das Weggehen fiel ihm schwer

leaving

:
leaving certificate
n (Brit) → Abgangszeugnis nt
leaving day
n (Sch) → Schuljahrsabschluss m, → letzter Schultag
leaving do
n (esp Brit inf) → Abschiedsfete f, → Ausstand m
leaving party
nAbschiedsfeier or -party f
leaving present
References in classic literature ?
And when they went away, leaving comfort behind, I think there were not in all the city four merrier people than the hungry little girls who gave away their breakfasts and contented themselves with bread and milk on Christmas morning.
Without looking back, the old man had hurried down the hillside and across a meadow, leaving George Willard perplexed and frightened upon the grassy slope.
Looking at them reminded her of her rings, which she had given to her husband before leaving for the beach.
Jennings, when they met at breakfast the following morning, "Sir John will not like leaving Barton next week;
They came to say good-by with as much ceremony and as little feeling as if they were leaving the house under ordinary circumstances.