legacy


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Related to legacy: legacy data

leg·a·cy

 (lĕg′ə-sē)
n. pl. leg·a·cies
1. Money or property given to another by will.
2. Something handed down from an ancestor or a predecessor or from the past: a legacy of religious freedom. See Synonyms at heritage.
3. An individual who is either an applicant to an educational institution or a matriculated student and is the child of an alumna or alumnus.
adj.
Retained under an obsolescent or discarded system, chiefly for purposes of reference: legacy files in the old email system.

[Middle English legacie, office of a deputy, from Old French, from Medieval Latin lēgātia, from Latin lēgātus, past participle of lēgāre, to depute, bequeath; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

legacy

(ˈlɛɡəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Law) a gift by will, esp of money or personal property
2. (Law) something handed down or received from an ancestor or predecessor
3. (Computer Science) (modifier) surviving computer systems, hardware, or software: legacy network; legacy application.
[C14 (meaning: office of a legate), C15 (meaning: bequest): from Medieval Latin lēgātia commission; see legate]

leg•a•cy

(ˈlɛg ə si)

n., pl. -cies,
adj. n.
1. (in a will) a gift of property, esp. personal property, as money; bequest.
2. anything handed down from the past, as from an ancestor or predecessor.
3. Obs. the office, function, or commission of a legate.
4. a student at or applicant to a college that was attended by his or her parent.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to old or outdated computer hardware, software, or data that, while still functional, does not work well with up-to-date systems.
[1325–75; Middle English legacie office of a deputy or legate < Medieval Latin lēgātia. See legate, -acy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legacy - (law) a gift of personal property by will
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
inheritance, heritage - that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner
gift - something acquired without compensation

legacy

noun
1. bequest, inheritance, endowment, gift, estate, devise (Law), heirloom You could make a real difference to someone's life by leaving them a generous legacy.
2. heritage, tradition, inheritance, throwback, birthright, patrimony the `fight or flight syndrome' is a legacy from the days of our ancestors
3. repercussion, result, fruit, consequences, aftermath a programme to overcome the legacy of inequality created by Apartheid

legacy

noun
1. Any special privilege accorded a firstborn:
2. Something immaterial, as a style or philosophy, that is passed from one generation to another:
Translations
ميراث
odkaz
arv
arfur
mantojumsnovēlējums
kalıtmiras

legacy

[ˈlegəsɪ] Nlegado m (fig) → legado m, herencia f
this inflation is a legacy of the previous governmentesta inflación es un legado del gobierno anterior

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsi] n
(fig)héritage m
the legacy of Colonialism → l'héritage du colonialisme
the legacy of inequality and injustice created by Apartheid → l'héritage d'inégalité et d'injustice laissé par l'apartheid
(in will)héritage m, legs m
to leave sb a legacy → faire un legs à qn, laisser un héritage à qn

legacy

n (lit, fig)Erbschaft f, → Vermächtnis nt; (fig also)Erbe nt; (fig pej)Hinterlassenschaft f; to leave somebody a legacy of something (fig)jdm etw hinterlassen; our legacy to future generations must not be a polluted worldwir dürfen den zukünftigen Generationen keine verschmutzte Welt hinterlassen; the tragedy left a legacy of bitternessdie Tragödie hinterließ Bitterkeit

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsɪ] neredità f inv (fig) → retaggio

legacy

(ˈlegəsi) plural ˈlegacies noun
something left in a will by someone who has died. He was left a legacy by his great-aunt.
References in classic literature ?
Had he not bequeathed a legacy of hatred against the Pyncheons to this only grandson, who, as it appeared, was now about to exercise a subtle influence over the daughter of his enemy's house?
Full black; dealer in real estate; worth thirty thousand dollars; about forty years old; free six years; paid eighteen hundred dollars for his family; member of the Baptist church; received a legacy from his master, which he has taken good care of, and increased.
Besides, the words Legacy, Bequest, go side by side with the words, Death, Funeral.
On the mother's death, the money from which her income had been derived was to go to Andrew and Selina, in the same relative proportions as before -- five thousand pounds having been first deducted from the sum and paid to Michael, as the sole legacy left by the implacable father to his eldest son.
He had awakened with a certain blank and childish sense of pleasure, like a man who had received a legacy overnight; but this feeling gradually died away, and was then suddenly and stunningly succeeded by a conviction of the truth.
The term for which Edmond had engaged to serve on board The Young Amelia having expired, Dantes took leave of the captain, who at first tried all his powers of persuasion to induce him to remain as one of the crew, but having been told the history of the legacy, he ceased to importune him further.
He took nothing by it, and has left a legacy of sorrow to myself, for he has been gone a long time, and we know not whether he is alive or dead.
More recently he had expended a legacy of a thousand or two of dollars in purchasing Mexican scrip, and thereby became the proprietor of a province; which, however, so far as Peter could find out, was situated where he might have had an empire for the same money,--in the clouds.
This is a legacy whose value the changes of time cannot affect.
Polina a personal legacy of seven thousand pounds sterling.
Well, but I am not the superintendent of his majesty's finances -- I have my purse -- surely I would do much for his majesty's welfare -- some legacy -- but I cannot disappoint my family.
Three girls, the two eldest sixteen and fourteen, was an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath, an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father.