legacy


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Related to legacy: legacy data

leg·a·cy

 (lĕg′ə-sē)
n. pl. leg·a·cies
1. Money or property given to another by will.
2. Something handed down from an ancestor or a predecessor or from the past: a legacy of religious freedom. See Synonyms at heritage.
3. An individual who is either an applicant to an educational institution or a matriculated student and is the child of an alumna or alumnus.
adj.
Retained under an obsolescent or discarded system, chiefly for purposes of reference: legacy files in the old email system.

[Middle English legacie, office of a deputy, from Old French, from Medieval Latin lēgātia, from Latin lēgātus, past participle of lēgāre, to depute, bequeath; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

legacy

(ˈlɛɡəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Law) a gift by will, esp of money or personal property
2. (Law) something handed down or received from an ancestor or predecessor
3. (Computer Science) (modifier) surviving computer systems, hardware, or software: legacy network; legacy application.
[C14 (meaning: office of a legate), C15 (meaning: bequest): from Medieval Latin lēgātia commission; see legate]

leg•a•cy

(ˈlɛg ə si)

n., pl. -cies,
adj. n.
1. (in a will) a gift of property, esp. personal property, as money; bequest.
2. anything handed down from the past, as from an ancestor or predecessor.
3. Obs. the office, function, or commission of a legate.
4. a student at or applicant to a college that was attended by his or her parent.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to old or outdated computer hardware, software, or data that, while still functional, does not work well with up-to-date systems.
[1325–75; Middle English legacie office of a deputy or legate < Medieval Latin lēgātia. See legate, -acy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legacy - (law) a gift of personal property by will
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
inheritance, heritage - that which is inherited; a title or property or estate that passes by law to the heir on the death of the owner
gift - something acquired without compensation

legacy

noun
1. bequest, inheritance, endowment, gift, estate, devise (Law), heirloom You could make a real difference to someone's life by leaving them a generous legacy.
2. heritage, tradition, inheritance, throwback, birthright, patrimony the `fight or flight syndrome' is a legacy from the days of our ancestors
3. repercussion, result, fruit, consequences, aftermath a programme to overcome the legacy of inequality created by Apartheid

legacy

noun
1. Any special privilege accorded a firstborn:
2. Something immaterial, as a style or philosophy, that is passed from one generation to another:
Translations
ميراث
odkaz
arv
arfur
mantojumsnovēlējums
kalıtmiras

legacy

[ˈlegəsɪ] Nlegado m (fig) → legado m, herencia f
this inflation is a legacy of the previous governmentesta inflación es un legado del gobierno anterior

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsi] n
(fig)héritage m
the legacy of Colonialism → l'héritage du colonialisme
the legacy of inequality and injustice created by Apartheid → l'héritage d'inégalité et d'injustice laissé par l'apartheid
(in will)héritage m, legs m
to leave sb a legacy → faire un legs à qn, laisser un héritage à qn

legacy

n (lit, fig)Erbschaft f, → Vermächtnis nt; (fig also)Erbe nt; (fig pej)Hinterlassenschaft f; to leave somebody a legacy of something (fig)jdm etw hinterlassen; our legacy to future generations must not be a polluted worldwir dürfen den zukünftigen Generationen keine verschmutzte Welt hinterlassen; the tragedy left a legacy of bitternessdie Tragödie hinterließ Bitterkeit

legacy

[ˈlɛgəsɪ] neredità f inv (fig) → retaggio

legacy

(ˈlegəsi) plural ˈlegacies noun
something left in a will by someone who has died. He was left a legacy by his great-aunt.
References in classic literature ?
This is a legacy whose value the changes of time cannot affect.
You have had a legacy left you of a hundred pounds.
Bruff reminded me that somebody must put my cousin's legacy into my cousin's hands-- and that I might as well do it as anybody else.
had made a beautiful will, but he had left her as a separate legacy, his Aunt.
His will took no notice of my father or my mother; but he left to my sister (always supposed to be his favorite in the family) a most extraordin ary legacy of possible pin-money, in the shape of a contingent reversion to the sum of three thousand pounds, payable on the death of Lady Malkinshaw, provided I survived her.
Trumbull was to have the gold-headed cane and fifty pounds; the other second cousins and the cousins present were each to have the like handsome sum, which, as the saturnine cousin observed, was a sort of legacy that left a man nowhere; and there was much more of such offensive dribbling in favor of persons not present-- problematical, and, it was to be feared, low connections.
Well, but I am not the superintendent of his majesty's finances -- I have my purse -- surely I would do much for his majesty's welfare -- some legacy -- but I cannot disappoint my family.
If so be that it be so, the legacy may go to the devil with him that gave it.
Your eyes are opened, sir; and you will not fail to remark (as I remark) that the Combe-Raven property happens to reach the same sum exactly, as the legacy which your wife's own instructions directed you to leave her.
It was only this morning, when the codicil giving the legacy to Geoffrey was waiting to be executed, that his real feeling in the matter came out.
As if they were heads in a note-book, he ran through all the incidents of the Schlegels' campaign: the attempt to compromise his brother, his mother's legacy, his father's marriage, the introduction of the furniture, the unpacking of the same.
Besides, the words Legacy, Bequest, go side by side with the words, Death, Funeral.