legion


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le·gion

 (lē′jən)
n.
1. The major unit of the Roman army consisting of 3,000 to 6,000 infantry troops and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
2. A large military unit trained for combat; an army.
3. A large number; a multitude. See Synonyms at multitude.
4. often Legion A national organization of former members of the armed forces.
adj.
Constituting a large number; multitudinous: Her admirers were legion. His mistakes were legion.

[Middle English legioun, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legiōn-, from legere, to gather; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

legion

(ˈliːdʒən)
n
1. (Military) a military unit of the ancient Roman army made up of infantry with supporting cavalry, numbering some three to six thousand men
2. (Military) any large military force: the French Foreign Legion.
3. (Military) (usually capital) an association of ex-servicemen: the British Legion.
4. (often plural) any very large number, esp of people
adj
(usually postpositive) very large or numerous
[C13: from Old French, from Latin legio, from legere to choose]

le•gion

(ˈli dʒən)

n.
1. the largest unit of the Roman army, comprising at different periods from about 3000 to 6000 foot soldiers, with a much smaller complement of cavalry.
2. a military or semimilitary unit.
3. the Legion.
4. any large group of armed men.
5. any great number of persons or things; multitude; throng.
adj.
6. very great in number: The holy man's followers were legion.
[1175–1225; Middle English legi(o)un (< Old French) < Latin legiō=leg(ere) to gather, choose, read + -iō -ion]

Legion

 a multitude; a great number; a unit of Roman troops; a host of armed men.
Examples: legion of angels, 1380; of appetites and passions, 1751; of devils; of horrid hell, 1605; of knights, 1400; of reproaches, 1634; of Rome, 1387; of troops; of whelps, 1824.

legion

A Roman military unit, originally a citizen army, later comprising 4000 to 6000 heavy infantry soldiers with cavalry support.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legion - archaic terms for armylegion - archaic terms for army    
Roman Legion - a division of from 3000 to 6000 men (including cavalry) in the Roman army
Sabaoth - (plural) hosts or armies; used in the book of Romans in the New Testament; "Lord of Sabaoth"
army, ground forces, regular army - a permanent organization of the military land forces of a nation or state
2.legion - association of ex-servicemen; "the American Legion"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
3.legion - a large military unit; "the French Foreign Legion"
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
foreign legion - a military unit composed of foreign volunteers who serve the state
legionary, legionnaire - a soldier who is a member of a legion (especially the French Foreign Legion)
4.legion - a vast multitude
concourse, throng, multitude - a large gathering of people
Adj.1.legion - amounting to a large indefinite number; "numerous times"; "the family was numerous"; "Palomar's fans are legion"
many - a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `as' or `too' or `so' or `that'; amounting to a large but indefinite number; "many temptations"; "the temptations are many"; "a good many"; "a great many"; "many directions"; "take as many apples as you like"; "too many clouds to see"; "never saw so many people"

legion

noun
1. army, company, force, division, troop, brigade The last of the Roman legions left Britain in AD 410.
2. multitude, host, mass, drove, number, horde, myriad, throng His sense of humour won him a legion of friends.
adjective
1. very many, numerous, countless, myriad, numberless, multitudinous Books on this subject are legion.

legion

noun
A very large number of things grouped together:
adjective
Amounting to or consisting of a large, indefinite number:
Idiom: quite a few.
Translations
عَدَد غَفيرفَيْلَق
legiezástup
hærskarelegionmængde
légiósokaság
fjöldi, aragrúihersveit
legionas
leģionsmilzums
légia
alayçok kalabalık sayıdalejyon

legion

[ˈliːdʒən] Nlegión f (also fig)
they are legionson legión, son muchos
LEGION
La American Legion es una organización de veteranos de las Fuerzas Armadas estadounidenses. Se fundó después de la Primera Guerra Mundial y se encarga del cuidado y la reintegración de los veteranos de guerra y sus familias. También es un órgano de presión ante el Congreso en favor de los intereses de los veteranos y de un sólido sistema de defensa nacional. A otro nivel, la American Legion ha creado clubs sociales para sus miembros.
En el Reino Unido el equivalente de la American Legion es la British Legion que, todos los años en noviembre, recauda fondos mediante la venta de amapolas de papel.

legion

[ˈliːdʒən]
n
(= group of soldiers) → légion f
(fig) (= large number) [fans, supporters] → légion f
adj (= very numerous) to be legion → être légion inv
Stories about him are legion → Les récits à son sujet sont légion.

legion

n
Armee f; (= Foreign Legion)Legion f
(Roman) → Legion f
(= organization) LegionLegion f; American/British LegionAmerican/British Legion f (Verband der Kriegsveteranen); Legion of HonourEhrenlegion f
(fig: = large number) → Legion f; they are legionihre Zahl ist Legion; his supporters are legionseine Anhänger sind Legion

legion

[ˈliːdʒn]
1. nlegione f (fig) → schiera, stuolo
2. adj (frm) (very many) → innumerevole

legion

(ˈliːdʒən) noun
1. in ancient Rome, a body of from three to six thousand soldiers.
2. a great many or a very large number.
References in classic literature ?
Books were flung aside without being put away on the shelves, inkstands were overturned, benches thrown down, and the whole school was turned loose an hour before the usual time, bursting forth like a legion of young imps, yelping and racketing about the green in joy at their early emancipation.
Windows were rattling, shutters flapping, and wind carousing, rumbling, and tumbling down the chimney, and, every once in a while, puffing out smoke and ashes, as if a legion of spirits were coming after them.
I wonder that about this time, or say between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, too late for the morning papers and too early for the evening ones, there is not a general explosion heard up and down the street, scattering a legion of antiquated and house-bred notions and whims to the four winds for an airing-and so the evil cure itself.
The cross of the Legion of Honor has been conferred upon me.
A soldier of the Legion lay dying in Algiers, There was lack of woman's nursing, there was dearth of woman's tears.
Oh, Adele will go to school--I have settled that already; nor do I mean to torment you with the hideous associations and recollections of Thornfield Hall--this accursed place--this tent of Achan--this insolent vault, offering the ghastliness of living death to the light of the open sky--this narrow stone hell, with its one real fiend, worse than a legion of such as we imagine.
But leaving out my arm, every inch of me is as sore as if I had been fighting with a legion of imps
returned Scrooge, `I have but to swallow this, and be for the rest of my days persecuted by a legion of goblins, all of my own creation.
A legion of fiends have occupied the bosom of the Jewess,'' replied the Templar; ``for, I think no single one, not even Apollyon himself, could have inspired such indomitable pride and resolution.
Now there was a deep well in the tower in which Prince Camaralzaman was imprisoned, and this well was a favourite resort of the fairy Maimoune, daughter of Damriat, chief of a legion of genii.
In 1880, the French Government gave him the Volta Prize of fifty thousand francs and the Cross of the Legion of Honor.
said Don Quixote, "aye and what is more, a legion of devils, folk that can travel and make others travel without being weary, exactly as the whim seizes them.