lemma


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lem·ma 1

 (lĕm′ə)
n. pl. lem·mas or lem·ma·ta (lĕm′ə-tə)
1. A subsidiary proposition assumed to be valid and used to demonstrate a principal proposition.
2. A theme, argument, or subject indicated in a title.
3. A word or phrase treated in a glossary or similar listing.

[Latin lēmma, from Greek, from lambanein, to take.]

lem·ma 2

 (lĕm′ə)
n.
The lower of the two bracts that enclose each floret in a grass spikelet.

[Greek, husk, from lepein, to peel.]

lemma

(ˈlɛmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Mathematics) a subsidiary proposition, proved for use in the proof of another proposition
2. (Linguistics) linguistics a word considered as its citation form together with all the inflected forms. For example, the lemma go consists of go together with goes, going, went, and gone
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an argument or theme, esp when used as the subject or title of a composition
[C16 (meaning: proposition), C17 (meaning: title, theme): via Latin from Greek: premise, from lambanein to take (for granted)]

lemma

(ˈlɛmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Botany) the outer of two bracts surrounding each floret in a grass spikelet. Compare palea
[C19: from Greek: rind, from lepein to peel]

lem•ma1

(ˈlɛm ə)

n., pl. lem•mas, lem•ma•ta (ˈlɛm ə tə)
1. a subsidiary proposition introduced in proving some other proposition.
2. an argument or theme, esp. when indicated in a heading.
3. a word or phrase that is glossed; headword.
[1560–70; < Latin: theme, epigram < Greek lêmma something received, premise, derivative of lambánein to take]

lem•ma2

(ˈlɛm ə)

n., pl. lem•mas.
the tough, sometimes leathery lower bract of the pair of bracts surrounding the floral parts in a grass spikelet.
[1745–55; < Greek lémma shell, husk, derivative of lépein to peel]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lemma - a subsidiary proposition that is assumed to be true in order to prove another proposition
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
2.lemma - the lower and stouter of the two glumes immediately enclosing the floret in most Gramineae
glume - small dry membranous bract found in inflorescences of Gramineae and Cyperaceae
3.lemma - the heading that indicates the subject of an annotation or a literary composition or a dictionary entry
header, heading, head - a line of text serving to indicate what the passage below it is about; "the heading seemed to have little to do with the text"
Translations
lemma
lemma

lemma

[ˈlemə] (lemmas or lemmata (pl)) [ˈlemətə] Nlema m

lemma

pl <-s or -ta>
n (Ling) → Lemma nt
References in periodicals archive ?
After an an overview of the Elliott program; he covers homomorphisms from subhomogeneous C*-algebras to finite dimensional C*-algebras, the stable version of the basic homotopy lemma, a concrete version of the Bott map, a version of the basic homotopy lemma in finite dimensional C*-algebras, the notation of gTR(A)&lt;=1, the classification of C*-algebras with gTR(A)&lt;=1, the basic homotopy lemma in C*-algebras with gTR(A)&lt;=1, a theorem concerning how to lift KK-elements to homomorphisms, the notation of asymptotic unitary equivalence, and some current developments in the Elliott program (without full proofs).
Lemma 1 implies that this equation is true for only finitely many values of [lambda](l), hence for only finitely many values of l.
To see that u and v have indeed subharmonic extensions to (EQ) , we use our Lemma 2 as follows.
There are objections that the second lemma is either too broad or too narrow.
14] is induced by the images of the generators, and therefore, to prove the lemma, it is necessary to find conditions under which these images preserve the defining relations of [G.
Civil society is also associated with this project, he said, estimating that LEMMA "will have a strong and lasting impact" on the topic of migration.
We briefly summarize some notions from set theory that are necessary to understand the central tool for constructing a choice-free universe with an RCF without an integer part, namely Lemma 3 below, originally used by Hodges to show the dependence of several algebraic constructions on the Axiom of Choice ([H1]).
In the case where A [not equal to] 1 and B [not equal to] 1, using Lemma 3, (12) gives
In this case, Let a and b be the neighbors of v; by Lemma 1, we have
Numerous repetitions of the above lemma are needed in order to complete a solution of a given equation modulo of higher power which is of course computationally intensive.
Proof: Every trunk in R(F) initially has no colored vertices, so Alice can win the 4-MCG on R(F) by Lemma 6.
5] [subset or equal to] F and Bob can win the 2-ECG on the P5 by Lemma 9, which implies [[chi].