lent


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Lent

 (lĕnt)
n.
A 40-day period of fasting and penitence observed by many Christians in preparation for Easter. In Western churches, Lent lasts from Ash Wednesday until Easter, usually excepting Sundays.

[Middle English lenten, lente, spring, Lent, from Old English lencten; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

lent

 (lĕnt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of lend.

lent

(lɛnt)
vb
(Banking & Finance) the past tense and past participle of lend

Lent

(lɛnt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity the period of forty weekdays lasting from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday, observed as a time of penance and fasting commemorating Jesus' fasting in the wilderness
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (modifier) falling within or associated with the season before Easter: Lent observance.
3. (Rowing) (plural) (at Cambridge University) Lent term boat races
[Old English lencten, lengten spring, literally: lengthening (of hours of daylight)]

lent

(lɛnt)

v.
pt. and pp. of lend.

Lent

(lɛnt)

n.
(in the Christian religion) an annual season of fasting and penitence in preparation for Easter, beginning on Ash Wednesday and lasting 40 weekdays to Easter.
[before 1000; Middle English lente(n), Old English lencten, lengten spring, Lent, literally, lengthening (of daylight hours)]

-lent

var. of -ulent in loanwords from Latin: pestilent.

Lent

A period of spiritual discipline, fasting, and penance leading up to Easter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lent - a period of 40 weekdays from Ash Wednesday to Holy SaturdayLent - a period of 40 weekdays from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday
church calendar, ecclesiastical calendar - a calendar of the Christian year indicating the dates of fasts and festivals
Good Friday - Friday before Easter
Ash Wednesday - the 7th Wednesday before Easter; the first day of Lent; the day following Mardi Gras (`Fat Tuesday'); a day of fasting and repentance
season - a recurrent time marked by major holidays; "it was the Christmas season"
Translations
الصَّوْم الكبيرالأرْبَعينيالصَوْمُ الكَبِيرُ
půst
faste
paastopaastonaika
korizma
nagyböjt
四旬節
사순절
quadragesima
gavėnia
gavenis
obdobie pôstupôst
fastan
40 günlük Paskalya dönemiBüyük Perhiz
Великий піст
Tuần ăn chay

Lent

[lent] NCuaresma f

Lent

[ˈlɛnt] ncarême m

Lent

nFastenzeit f

Lent

[lɛnt] nQuaresima
I'm giving it up for Lent → vi rinuncio come fioretto (quaresimale)

Lent

(lent) noun
the time from Ash Wednesday to Easter (40 weekdays) observed as a time of fasting in commemoration of Christ's fast in the wilderness.

Lent

الصَوْمُ الكَبِيرُ půst faste Fastenzeit Μεγάλη Σαρακοστή Cuaresma paastonaika Carême korizma Quaresima 四旬節 사순절 Vasten faste Wielki Post Quaresma Великий пост fastan ฤดูถือบวชโดยอดอาหารประจำปีก่อนวันอีสเตอร์ของชาวคริสต์ 40 günlük Paskalya dönemi Tuần ăn chay 大斋节

lent

a. pp. de to lend prestado-a.
References in classic literature ?
However legal it may be To pay what never has been lent, This style of business seems to me Extremely inconvenient!
With bills, as you correctly state, I'm punctuality itself: A man may surely claim his dues: But, when there's money to be lent, A man must be allowed to choose Such times as are convenient
In ways truly miraculous, I had been lent four books, marvellous books, and them I had devoured.
At this instant there came into court two old men, one carrying a cane by way of a walking-stick, and the one who had no stick said, "Senor, some time ago I lent this good man ten gold-crowns in gold to gratify him and do him a service, on the condition that he was to return them to me whenever I should ask for them.
To which the old man replied, "I admit, senor, that he lent them to me; but let your worship lower your staff, and as he leaves it to my oath, I'll swear that I gave them back, and paid him really and truly.
He lent us the money to become our creditor; and he lends us the yacht to give another handle to the people who are saying already that he occupies the position in our family which is more fully recognized on the other side of the Channel
From his infancy he had, with calculation beyond his age, lent his name and complaisance to the follies of the Comte de Guiche.
De Manicamp cost -- money lent, never returned -- from twelve to fifteen hundred livres per annum.
So we talked about painting, poetry, and music, theology, geology, and philosophy: once or twice I lent her a book, and once she lent me one in return: I met her in her walks as often as I could; I came to her house as often as I dared.
It led to my remarking, with more zeal than discretion, that it came with a bad grace from him, to whom Startop had lent money in my presence but a week or so before.
The odd superstitions touched upon were all preva- lent among children and slaves in the West at the period of this story -- that is to say, thirty or forty years ago.
A TRULY Pious Person who conducted a savings bank and lent money to his sisters and his cousins and his aunts of both sexes, was approached by a Tatterdemalion, who applied for a loan of one hundred thousand dollars.