leper


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lep·er

 (lĕp′ər)
n.
1. A person affected by leprosy.
2. A person who is avoided by others; a pariah.

[Middle English, from lepre, leprosy, from Old French, from Late Latin lepra, from Greek lepros, scaly, from lepis, scale.]

leper

(ˈlɛpə)
n
1. (Pathology) a person who has leprosy
2. derogatory a person who is ignored or despised
[C14: via Late Latin from Greek lepra, noun use of lepros scaly, from lepein to peel]
Usage: Rather than talking about a leper or lepers, it is better to talk about a person with leprosy and people with leprosy

lep•er

(ˈlɛp ər)

n.
1. a person who has leprosy.
2. a person rejected or ostracized for unacceptable behavior, opinions, character, or the like; outcast.
[1350–1400; Middle English lepre leprosy < Latin lepra < Greek lépra, n. use of feminine of leprós scaly, akin to lépos scale, lépein to peel]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leper - a person afflicted with leprosyleper - a person afflicted with leprosy  
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
2.leper - a pariah who is avoided by others
castaway, outcast, pariah, Ishmael - a person who is rejected (from society or home)

leper

noun outcast, reject, untouchable, pariah, lazar (archaic) The article branded her a social leper.
Translations
شَخْص أبْرَص
malomocný
spedalsk
henkilöhyljeksiäspitaalinen
מצרע
leprás
holdsveikur maîur
raupsairaupsuotasis
lepras slimnieks, spitālīgais
trędowaty
malomocný
cüzzamlı kimse

leper

[ˈlepəʳ]
A. Nleproso/a m/f (also fig)
B. CPD leper colony Nleprosería f, colonia f de leprosos

leper

[ˈlɛpər] nlépreux/euse m/fleper colony nléproserie f

leper

nLeprakranke(r) mf, → Lepröse(r) mf (spec), → Aussätzige(r) mf (old, fig)

leper

[ˈlɛpəʳ] nlebbroso/a

leper

(ˈlepə) noun
a person who has leprosy.
ˈleprosy (-rəsi) noun
a contagious skin disease, causing serious and permanent damage to the body, including loss of fingers, nose etc.

lep·er

a. leproso-a, lazarino-a; que sufre de lepra.
References in classic literature ?
This king was a leper, and all his doctors had been unable to cure him, when a very clever physician came to his court.
When you look at yourself in the glass you see the typical appearance of the leper.
As she opened the door he smelt the sickly sweet smell which makes the neighbourhood of the leper nauseous.
Next, he saw the girl in the leper refuge and remembered it was for love of him that she had let him go.
Strangely enough, the house they point out to you now as his, has been turned into a leper hospital, and the inmates expose their horrid deformities and hold up their hands and beg for bucksheesh when a stranger enters.
In the busy street, in the crowded room, in the grind of work, in the whirl of pleasure, amid the many or amid the few--wherever men congregate together, wherever the music of human speech is heard and human thought is flashed from human eyes, there, shunned and solitary, the shy man, like a leper, stands apart.
He remembered how for months, trusting in what they told him, he had implored God to heal him as He had healed the Leper and made the Blind to see.
Pierre was received as if he were a corpse or a leper.
While Stella read My Graves, punctuating its tragic paragraphs with chuckles, and Rusty slept the sleep of a just cat who has been out all night curled up on a Jane Andrews tale of a beautiful maiden of fifteen who went to nurse in a leper colony -- of course dying of the loathsome disease finally -- Anne glanced over the other manuscripts and recalled the old days at Avonlea school when the members of the Story Club, sitting under the spruce trees or down among the ferns by the brook, had written them.
For by it you are rendered infamous, and driven, like lepers of old, out of society; at least, from the society of all but wicked and reprobate persons; for no others will associate with you.
When the train came into the station, Anna got out into the crowd of passengers, and moving apart from them as if they were lepers, she stood on the platform, trying to think what she had come here for, and what she meant to do.
They were as dogs, wild beasts, lepers, and no soul that valued its hope of eternal life would throw it away by meddling in any sort with these rebuked and smitten outcasts.