lesion


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Related to lesion: Hill-Sachs lesion, Skin lesion

le·sion

 (lē′zhən)
n.
Any of various pathological or traumatic changes in a bodily organ or tissue, including tumors, ulcers, sores, and wounds.
tr.v. le·sioned, le·sion·ing, le·sions
To cause a lesion to form on or in.

[Middle English lesioun, from Old French lesion, from Latin laesiō, laesiōn-, from laesus, past participle of laedere, to injure.]

lesion

(ˈliːʒən)
n
1. (Pathology) any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease
2. (Pathology) an injury or wound
[C15: via Old French from Late Latin laesiō injury, from Latin laedere to hurt]

le•sion

(ˈli ʒən)
n.
1. an injury; hurt; wound.
2. any localized, usu. well-defined area of diseased or injured tissue or of abnormal structural change.
v.t.
3. to cause a lesion or lesions in.
[1425–75; < Middle French < Latin laesiō injury = Latin laed(ere) to injure + -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lesion - any localized abnormal structural change in a bodily partlesion - any localized abnormal structural change in a bodily part
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
tubercle - a swelling that is the characteristic lesion of tuberculosis
ulcer, ulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
2.lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
raw wound - a wound that exposes subcutaneous tissue
stigmata - marks resembling the wounds on the crucified body of Christ
abrasion, excoriation, scratch, scrape - an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off
gash, slash, slice, cut - a wound made by cutting; "he put a bandage over the cut"
laceration - a torn ragged wound
bite - a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person

lesion

noun injury, hurt, wound, bruise, trauma (Pathology), sore, impairment, abrasion, contusion skin lesions
Translations
léze
vamma

lesion

[ˈliːʒən] Nlesión f

lesion

[ˈliːʒən] nlésion f

lesion

nVerletzung f; (= structural change)krankhafte Gewebsveränderung; lesions in the brainGehirnverletzungen pl

lesion

[ˈliːʒn] n (Med) → lesione f

le·sion

n. lesión, herida, contusión;
degenerative ______ degenerativa;
depressive ______ depresiva;
diffuse ______ difusa;
functional ______ funcional;
gross ______ grosera;
peripheral ______ periférica;
precancerous ______ precancerosa;
systemic ______ sistemática;
toxic ______ tóxica;
traumatic ______ traumática;
vascular ______ vascular;
whiplash ______ de latigazo.
V. cuadro en la página 167.

lesion

n lesión f
References in classic literature ?
Turnbull was sent for; but when he heard what had passed, he said this complete restoration, though only temporary, was a hopeful sign, proving that there was no permanent lesion to prevent ultimate recovery.
But this return to the upper strata was not so sudden as to cause relief from the pressure too rapidly, which might have produced serious disorder in our organisation, and brought on internal lesions, so fatal to divers.
After I had graduated I continued to devote myself to research, occupying a minor position in King's College Hospital, and I was fortunate enough to excite considerable interest by my research into the pathology of catalepsy, and finally to win the Bruce Pinkerton prize and medal by the monograph on nervous lesions to which your friend has just alluded.
One can distinguish on its ruins three sorts of lesions, all three of which cut into it at different depths; first, time, which has insensibly notched its surface here and there, and gnawed it everywhere; next, political and religious revolution, which, blind and wrathful by nature, have flung themselves tumultuously upon it, torn its rich garment of carving and sculpture, burst its rose windows, broken its necklace of arabesques and tiny figures, torn out its statues, sometimes because of their mitres, sometimes because of their crowns; lastly, fashions, even more grotesque and foolish, which, since the anarchical and splendid deviations of the Renaissance, have followed each other in the necessary decadence of architecture.
There may have been lesions of the brain itself, the effect of which can never be removed.
No doubt physiology, especially the disturbances of memory through lesions in the brain, affords grounds for this hypothesis; nevertheless it does remain a hypothesis, the validity of which will be discussed at the end of this lecture.
Lesion features are frequently characterized based on shape, echogenicity, shadowing, margin irregularity, and microlobulation.
The typical presentation of an incidental lesion found on radiograph is pain located near the site of the lesion.
A "substantial proportion" of malignant lesions are found incidentally among patients referred to dermatologists for a different lesion flagged by the referring physician or health care professional, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Dermatology.
Seven areas on each foot received a severity score from 0 to 2 for each type of lesion (0 = no lesion, 1 = mild to moderate lesion, 2 = severe lesion).
The type of impairment associated with neurofibromas depends largely on the site of the lesion.
A 69-year-old woman was examined on October 30, 1996, for a skin lesion on her left thigh.