lessor


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les·sor

 (lĕs′ôr′, lĕ-sôr′)
n.
One who leases property; a landlord.

[Middle English lessour, from Anglo-Norman, from lesser, to let out, lease; see lease.]

lessor

(ˈlɛsɔː; lɛˈsɔː)
n
(Law) a person who grants a lease of property

les•sor

(ˈlɛs ɔr, lɛˈsɔr)

n.
a person who grants a lease.
[1350–1400; Middle English lesso(u)r < Anglo-French. See lease, -or2]

lessor

a person or entity that grants a lease to another; a person or entity that leases property as a landlord.
See also: Property and Ownership
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lessor - someone who grants a lease
owner, proprietor - (law) someone who owns (is legal possessor of) a business; "he is the owner of a chain of restaurants"
Translations

lessor

[lɛˈsɔːr ˈlɛsɔːr] nbailleur/eresse m/f

lessor

n (form)Verpächter(in) m(f); (of flat etc)Vermieter(in) m(f); (of equipment)Leasinggeber(in) m(f)

lessor

[lɛˈsɔːʳ] nlocatore/trice
References in periodicals archive ?
Fitch Ratings said it has completed a peer review of five rated aircraft lessors, resulting in the affirmation of the long-term Issuer Default Ratings (IDRs) of AerCap Holdings N.
We source capital for our clients through The Global Lessor Network (GLN), a community of more than 500 lessors from around the world who are ready to provide local leasing expertise and transact with lessees that fit their credit appetite, equipment interests, and geographic footprint.
The Lessor and the Lessee may be referred to jointly as the "Parties," and each separately as a "Party.
Ernst & Young is concerned about the conceptual basis for a lessee recognizing a liability for lease payments that do not represent an unconditional obligation and similarly for a lessor recognizing a receivable for amounts other than those that the lessor has an unconditional right to receive.
An operating lease, put simply, is a lease where the lessor takes residual risk on the asset and rent is broadly based on the actual cost (including depreciation) and profit margin to the lessor, with the lessor taking back the asset at the end of the lease.
If a question exists as to the reasonableness of the rent, the parties may consider adding a clause to the agreement (before entering into it) providing for repayment by the lessor of any disallowed rents.
In its present position, paragraph 31 may be interpreted by lessees as confirming their eligibility to claim input tax credits (ITCs), because affected taxpayers may stop reading once they encounter an example where the lessor can claim an ITC for the repair services.
The car must come back to the lessor in its original condition or you pay to restore it.
RENTAL AND OTHER PAYMENTS: A lease also will contain a provision that describes the rental and other payments you're required to pay the lessor during the term of the lease.
Companies that want to deduct cancellation payments should not lease replacement property from the original lessor.
In either circumstance, the lessor will probably be open to discussing these options, since they have a familiar, ready and willing customer.
If the lessor wants to operate his lease (asset) to make profit, he will provide assets on hire to others for use under an agreement.