let go


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Related to let go: Let Go and Let God

let 1

 (lĕt)
v. let, let·ting, lets
v.tr.
1. To give permission or opportunity to; allow: I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house. See Usage Note at leave1.
2. To cause to; make: Let the news be known.
3.
a. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a command, request, or proposal: Let's finish the job! Let x equal y.
b. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a warning or threat: Just let her try!
4. To permit to enter, proceed, or depart: let the dog in.
5. To release from or as if from confinement: let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp.
6. To rent or lease: let rooms.
7. To award, especially after bids have been submitted: let the construction job to a new firm.
v.intr.
1. To become rented or leased.
2. To be or become assigned, as to a contractor.
Phrasal Verbs:
let down
1. To cause to come down gradually; lower: let down the sails.
2. To withdraw support from; forsake.
3. To fail to meet the expectations of; disappoint.
let on
1. To allow to be known; admit: Don't let on that you know me.
2. To pretend.
let out
1. To come to a close; end: School let out early. The play let out at 10:30.
2. To make known; reveal: Who let that story out?
3. To increase the size of (a garment, for example): let out a coat.
let up
1. To slow down; diminish: didn't let up in their efforts.
2. To become less severe or intense: The rain let up.
Idioms:
let alone
Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
let go
To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
let off on Informal
To cause to diminish, as in pressure; ease up on: Let off on the gas so that we do not exceed the speed limit.
let (one's) hair down
To drop one's reserve or inhibitions.
let (someone) have it Informal
1. To beat, strike, or shoot at someone.
2. To scold or punish.
let (someone) in on
1. To reveal (a secret) to someone: They finally let me in on their plans.
2. To allow someone to participate in (something).
let up on
To be or become more lenient with: Why don't you let up on the poor child?

[Middle English leten, from Old English lǣtan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let 2

 (lĕt)
n.
1. Something that hinders; an obstacle: free to investigate without let or hindrance.
2. Sports An invalid stroke in tennis and other net games that requires a replay.
tr.v. let·ted or let, let·ting, lets Archaic
To hinder or obstruct.

[Middle English lette, from letten, to hinder, from Old English lettan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let go

See Usage entry at release - let go.


release

let go

Release and let go are used in similar ways. Release is more formal than let go.

If you release a person or animal or let them go, you allow them to leave or escape.

They had just been released from prison.
Eventually I let the frog go.

To release or let go of something or someone also means to stop holding them.

He released her hand quickly.
'Let go of me,' she said.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.let go - release, as from one's griplet go - release, as from one's grip; "Let go of the door handle, please!"; "relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall"
muster out, discharge - release from military service
unclasp - release from a clasp; "She clasped and unclasped her hands"
pop - release suddenly; "pop the clutch"
toggle - release by a toggle switch; "toggle a bomb from an airplane"
unhand - remove the hand from
bring out, let out - bring out of a specific state
unleash - release or vent; "unleash one's anger"
let loose, loose, unleash - turn loose or free from restraint; "let loose mines"; "Loose terrible plagues upon humanity"
unleash - release from a leash; "unleash the dogs in the park"
disengage, withdraw - release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles; "I want to disengage myself from his influence"; "disengage the gears"
2.let go - be relaxed; "Don't be so worried all the time--just let go!"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
Translations
يَتْرُك، يُفْلِت
elereszt

let1

(let) present participle ˈletting: past tense, past participle let verb
1. to allow or permit. She refused to let her children go out in the rain; Let me see your drawing.
2. to cause to. I will let you know how much it costs.
3. used for giving orders or suggestions. If they will not work, let them starve; Let's (= let us) leave right away!
let alone
not to mention; without taking into consideration. There's no room for all the adults, let alone the children.
let (someone or something) alone/be
to leave alone; not to disturb or worry. Why don't you let him be when he's not feeling well!; Do let your father alone.
let down
1. to lower. She let down the blind.
2. to disappoint or fail to help when necessary etc. You must give a film show at the party – you can't let the children down (noun ˈlet-down); She felt he had let her down by not coming to see her perform.
3. to make flat by allowing the air to escape. When he got back to his car, he found that some children had let his tyres down.
4. to make longer. She had to let down the child's skirt.
let fall
to drop. She was so startled she let fall everything she was carrying.
let go (of)
to stop holding (something). Will you let go of my coat!; When he was nearly at the top of the rope he suddenly let go and fell.
let in/out
to allow to come in, go out. Let me in!; I let the dog out.
let in for
to involve (someone) in. I didn't know what I was letting myself in for when I agreed to do that job.
let in on
to allow to share (a secret etc). We'll let her in on our plans.
let off
1. to fire (a gun) or cause (a firework etc) to explode. He let the gun off accidentally.
2. to allow to go without punishment etc. The policeman let him off (with a warning).
let up to become less strong or violent; to stop: I wish the rain would let up (noun ˈlet-up)
let well alone
to allow things to remain as they are, in order not to make them worse.
References in classic literature ?
This is as near to being inside as she may venture, because, if she were to let go her hold of the railings for one moment, the balloons would lift her up, and she would be flown away.
He heard her, and tried to pull down the sail; but the wind would not let go of the broad canvas and the ropes had become tangled.
As they passed the little whitewashed cottage, she suddenly let go his hand, and darted inside.
I got hold of his thumb and bent it back, until he let go with a yell.
Now just wiggle your shoulders this way," he said, "and let go.
Just as you please,' said Nikita, and again let go of his collar.
Then they let go and give Tom another smashing round, and he--well, he wouldn't 'a' sold out for a silver mine.
I paid her fairly, but she not contented laid hold of me and never let go until she brought me here; she says I forced her, but she lies by the oath I swear or am ready to swear; and this is the whole truth and every particle of it.
I was so thoroughly the master of John Barleycorn I could take up with him or let go of him whenever I pleased, just as I had done all my life.
Their movements perceptibly quickened under his coaching, and as the boat swung inboard I was sent forward to let go the jibs.
We had to be constantly on the alert to avoid a capsize, and while Charley steered I held the main-sheet in my hand with but a single turn round a pin, ready to let go at any moment.
Anne promptly let go of her candle and plate in her surprise, and plate, candle, and apples crashed together down the cellar ladder and were found at the bottom embedded in melted grease, the next day, by Marilla, who gathered them up and thanked mercy the house hadn't been set on fire.