let up


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Related to let up: rub off, turn out to be

let 1

 (lĕt)
v. let, let·ting, lets
v.tr.
1. To give permission or opportunity to; allow: I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house. See Usage Note at leave1.
2. To cause to; make: Let the news be known.
3.
a. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a command, request, or proposal: Let's finish the job! Let x equal y.
b. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a warning or threat: Just let her try!
4. To permit to enter, proceed, or depart: let the dog in.
5. To release from or as if from confinement: let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp.
6. To rent or lease: let rooms.
7. To award, especially after bids have been submitted: let the construction job to a new firm.
v.intr.
1. To become rented or leased.
2. To be or become assigned, as to a contractor.
Phrasal Verbs:
let down
1. To cause to come down gradually; lower: let down the sails.
2. To withdraw support from; forsake.
3. To fail to meet the expectations of; disappoint.
let on
1. To allow to be known; admit: Don't let on that you know me.
2. To pretend.
let out
1. To come to a close; end: School let out early. The play let out at 10:30.
2. To make known; reveal: Who let that story out?
3. To increase the size of (a garment, for example): let out a coat.
let up
1. To slow down; diminish: didn't let up in their efforts.
2. To become less severe or intense: The rain let up.
Idioms:
let alone
Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
let go
To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
let off on Informal
To cause to diminish, as in pressure; ease up on: Let off on the gas so that we do not exceed the speed limit.
let (one's) hair down
To drop one's reserve or inhibitions.
let (someone) have it Informal
1. To beat, strike, or shoot at someone.
2. To scold or punish.
let (someone) in on
1. To reveal (a secret) to someone: They finally let me in on their plans.
2. To allow someone to participate in (something).
let up on
To be or become more lenient with: Why don't you let up on the poor child?

[Middle English leten, from Old English lǣtan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let 2

 (lĕt)
n.
1. Something that hinders; an obstacle: free to investigate without let or hindrance.
2. Sports An invalid stroke in tennis and other net games that requires a replay.
tr.v. let·ted or let, let·ting, lets Archaic
To hinder or obstruct.

[Middle English lette, from letten, to hinder, from Old English lettan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let up

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to diminish, slacken, or stop
2. (foll by on) informal to be less harsh (towards someone)
n
informal a lessening or abatement
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.let up - become less in amount or intensitylet up - become less in amount or intensity; "The storm abated"; "The rain let up after a few hours"
decrease, diminish, lessen, fall - decrease in size, extent, or range; "The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester"; "The cabin pressure fell dramatically"; "her weight fell to under a hundred pounds"; "his voice fell to a whisper"
2.let up - reduce pressure or intensity; "he eased off the gas pedal and the car slowed down"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"

let

verb
1. To give one's consent to:
Informal: OK.
2. To afford an opportunity for:
3. To neither forbid nor prevent:
4. To give temporary use of in return for payment:
hire (out), lease, rent.
phrasal verb
let down
1. To cause to descend:
2. To cause unhappiness by failing to satisfy the hopes, desires, or expectations of:
phrasal verb
let in
To serve as a means of entrance for:
phrasal verb
let off
1. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
2. To free from an obligation or duty:
phrasal verb
let out
1. To discharge material, as vapor or fumes, usually suddenly and violently:
2. To remove (a liquid) by a steady, gradual process:
drain, draw (off), pump, tap.
3. To disclose in a breach of confidence:
Informal: spill.
Archaic: discover.
phrasal verb
let up
1. To grow or cause to grow gradually less:
2. To become or cause to become less active or intense:
abate, bate, die (away, down, off, or out), ease (off or up), ebb, fall, fall off, lapse, moderate, remit, slacken, slack off, subside, wane.
3. To reduce in tension, pressure, or rigidity:
Translations
يَخِف
polevitustat
aftageholde op
slota, linna
dinmekhafiflemek

w>let up

vi
(= cease)aufhören; he never lets up about his moneyer redet unaufhörlich or pausenlos von seinem Geld
(= ease up)nachlassen
to let up on somebodyjdn in Ruhe lassen; the trainer didn’t let up on them until they were perfectder Trainer hat so lange nicht locker gelassen, bis sie perfekt waren

let1

(let) present participle ˈletting: past tense, past participle let verb
1. to allow or permit. She refused to let her children go out in the rain; Let me see your drawing.
2. to cause to. I will let you know how much it costs.
3. used for giving orders or suggestions. If they will not work, let them starve; Let's (= let us) leave right away!
let alone
not to mention; without taking into consideration. There's no room for all the adults, let alone the children.
let (someone or something) alone/be
to leave alone; not to disturb or worry. Why don't you let him be when he's not feeling well!; Do let your father alone.
let down
1. to lower. She let down the blind.
2. to disappoint or fail to help when necessary etc. You must give a film show at the party – you can't let the children down (noun ˈlet-down); She felt he had let her down by not coming to see her perform.
3. to make flat by allowing the air to escape. When he got back to his car, he found that some children had let his tyres down.
4. to make longer. She had to let down the child's skirt.
let fall
to drop. She was so startled she let fall everything she was carrying.
let go (of)
to stop holding (something). Will you let go of my coat!; When he was nearly at the top of the rope he suddenly let go and fell.
let in/out
to allow to come in, go out. Let me in!; I let the dog out.
let in for
to involve (someone) in. I didn't know what I was letting myself in for when I agreed to do that job.
let in on
to allow to share (a secret etc). We'll let her in on our plans.
let off
1. to fire (a gun) or cause (a firework etc) to explode. He let the gun off accidentally.
2. to allow to go without punishment etc. The policeman let him off (with a warning).
let up to become less strong or violent; to stop: I wish the rain would let up (noun ˈlet-up)
let well alone
to allow things to remain as they are, in order not to make them worse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The teams are a lot tougher and you have to play hard and not let up.
ASL was the preferred bidder when UPS went to buy TNT in 2012 but the Dublin air cargo and passenger company s bid fell through when the EU wouldn t let UPS make the purchase due to competition concerns.
Expect to be kept extra busy with no let ups and no time to chat during tea breaks.