lethargy


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leth·ar·gy

 (lĕth′ər-jē)
n. pl. leth·ar·gies
1.
a. A lack of energy or vigor; sluggishness.
b. A lack of interest or enthusiasm; apathy: held a pep rally to shake the students out of their lethargy.
2. Medicine An abnormal state of drowsiness, as caused by disease or drugs.

[Middle English letargie, from Old French, from Late Latin lēthārgia, from Greek lēthārgiā, from lēthārgos, forgetful : lēthē, forgetfulness + ārgos, idle (a-, without; see a-1 + ergon, work; see werg- in Indo-European roots).]
Synonyms: lethargy, lassitude, torpor, languor
These nouns refer to a deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity. Lethargy is a state of sluggishness, drowsy dullness, or apathy: "Your lethargy is such that you will not fight even to protect the freedom which your mothers won for you" (Virginia Woolf).
Lassitude implies weariness or diminished energy such as might result from physical or mental strain: "His anger had evaporated; he felt nothing but utter lassitude" (John Galsworthy).
Torpor suggests the suspension of activity characteristic of an animal in hibernation: "Confinement induced torpor, and from torpor he could easily slip to passivity, resignation, death" (Larry McMurtry).
Languor is the indolence typical of one who is satiated by a life of luxury or pleasure: "with that slow, catlike way about him, cool, aloof, almost contemptuous in the languor and ease of his movements" (Tobias Wolff).

lethargy

(ˈlɛθədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. sluggishness, slowness, or dullness
2. (Pathology) an abnormal lack of energy, esp as the result of a disease
[C14: from Late Latin lēthargīa, from Greek lēthargos drowsy, from lēthē forgetfulness]
lethargic, leˈthargical adj
leˈthargically adv

leth•ar•gy

(ˈlɛθ ər dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
the quality or state of being drowsy and dull or listless and lacking in energy; apathetic or sluggish inactivity.
[1325–75; Middle English litargie < Medieval Latin litargīa (< Late Greek), Late Latin lēthargia < Greek lēthargía=lḗtharg(os) drowsy (akin to lḗthē; see Lethe) + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lethargy - a state of comatose torpor (as found in sleeping sickness)
hebetude - mental lethargy or dullness
torpidity, torpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibility; "he fell into a deep torpor"
2.lethargy - weakness characterized by a lack of vitality or energy
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"
3.lethargy - inactivitylethargy - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
inertia, inactiveness, inactivity - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"

lethargy

lethargy

noun
Translations
سُبات، خُمول، فُتور
netečnost
sløvhed
letargia
drungi; sinnuleysi
letargijaletargiškassustingimas
letarģija, dziļa vienaldzība
letargia
uyuşukluk

lethargy

[ˈleθədʒɪ] Nletargo m

lethargy

[ˈlɛθərdʒi] n [person] → léthargie f

lethargy

n
Lethargie f, → Trägheit f
(Med) → Schlafsucht f, → Lethargie f

lethargy

[ˈlɛθədʒɪ] n (see adj) → fiacchezza, apatia

lethargy

(ˈleθədʒi) noun
lack of interest or energy.
leˈthargic (-ˈθaː-) adjective

leth·ar·gy

n. letargo, estupor.

lethargy

n letargo, somnolencia
References in classic literature ?
Aroused from his lethargy by the cries and reports, Larsan opened the window of his chamber and called out to us.
Becky roused up from her lethargy of distress and showed good interest in the proceedings.
That proposal, unexpectedly, roused Linton from his lethargy, and threw him into a strange state of agitation.
I think that the digression of my thoughts must have done me good, for when I got back to bed I found a lethargy creeping over me.
I heard a slight scraping at the fence, and rousing myself from the lethargy that had fallen upon me, I looked down and saw him dimly, clambering over the palings.
Progress in the valley An Indian cavalier The captain falls into a lethargy A Nez Perce patriarch Hospitable treatment The bald head Bargaining Value of an old plaid cloak The family horse The cost of an Indian present
So I forced myself from my lethargy of despair and grief; and this thought, the sweetest thought of all my life, may or may not have been my unrealized stimulus ere now; it was in very deed my most conscious and perpetual spur henceforth until the end.
That done, they gave him cordial and some toast, and presently a pretty strong composing-draught, under the influence of which he soon fell into a lethargy, and, for a time, forgot his troubles.
Startled from his lethargy by that direful cry, Jonah staggers to his feet, and stumbling to the deck, grasps a shroud, to look out upon the sea.
But at the first words he uttered the comte roused himself from the kind of lethargy in which he had sunk.
His gaze upon her seemed to arouse her as from a lethargy.
But with the coming of Peter, who hates lethargy, they are under way again: if you put your ear to the ground now, you would hear the whole island seething with life.