lethargy


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leth·ar·gy

 (lĕth′ər-jē)
n. pl. leth·ar·gies
1.
a. A lack of energy or vigor; sluggishness.
b. A lack of interest or enthusiasm; apathy: held a pep rally to shake the students out of their lethargy.
2. Medicine An abnormal state of drowsiness, as caused by disease or drugs.

[Middle English letargie, from Old French, from Late Latin lēthārgia, from Greek lēthārgiā, from lēthārgos, forgetful : lēthē, forgetfulness + ārgos, idle (a-, without; see a-1 + ergon, work; see werg- in Indo-European roots).]
Synonyms: lethargy, lassitude, torpor, languor
These nouns refer to a deficiency in mental and physical alertness and activity. Lethargy is a state of sluggishness, drowsy dullness, or apathy: "Your lethargy is such that you will not fight even to protect the freedom which your mothers won for you" (Virginia Woolf).
Lassitude implies weariness or diminished energy such as might result from physical or mental strain: "His anger had evaporated; he felt nothing but utter lassitude" (John Galsworthy).
Torpor suggests the suspension of activity characteristic of an animal in hibernation: "Confinement induced torpor, and from torpor he could easily slip to passivity, resignation, death" (Larry McMurtry).
Languor is the indolence typical of one who is satiated by a life of luxury or pleasure: "with that slow, catlike way about him, cool, aloof, almost contemptuous in the languor and ease of his movements" (Tobias Wolff).

lethargy

(ˈlɛθədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. sluggishness, slowness, or dullness
2. (Pathology) an abnormal lack of energy, esp as the result of a disease
[C14: from Late Latin lēthargīa, from Greek lēthargos drowsy, from lēthē forgetfulness]
lethargic, leˈthargical adj
leˈthargically adv

leth•ar•gy

(ˈlɛθ ər dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
the quality or state of being drowsy and dull or listless and lacking in energy; apathetic or sluggish inactivity.
[1325–75; Middle English litargie < Medieval Latin litargīa (< Late Greek), Late Latin lēthargia < Greek lēthargía=lḗtharg(os) drowsy (akin to lḗthē; see Lethe) + -ia -y3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lethargy - a state of comatose torpor (as found in sleeping sickness)
hebetude - mental lethargy or dullness
torpidity, torpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibility; "he fell into a deep torpor"
2.lethargy - weakness characterized by a lack of vitality or energy
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"
3.lethargy - inactivitylethargy - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
inertia, inactiveness, inactivity - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"

lethargy

lethargy

noun
Translations
سُبات، خُمول، فُتور
netečnost
sløvhed
letargia
drungi; sinnuleysi
letargijaletargiškassustingimas
letarģija, dziļa vienaldzība
letargia
uyuşukluk

lethargy

[ˈleθədʒɪ] Nletargo m

lethargy

[ˈlɛθərdʒi] n [person] → léthargie f

lethargy

n
Lethargie f, → Trägheit f
(Med) → Schlafsucht f, → Lethargie f

lethargy

[ˈlɛθədʒɪ] n (see adj) → fiacchezza, apatia

lethargy

(ˈleθədʒi) noun
lack of interest or energy.
leˈthargic (-ˈθaː-) adjective

leth·ar·gy

n. letargo, estupor.

lethargy

n letargo, somnolencia
References in classic literature ?
Could the Judge but quaff a glass, it might enable him to shake off the unaccountable lethargy which (for the ten intervening minutes, and five to boot, are already past) has made him such a laggard at this momentous dinner.
Startled from his lethargy by that direful cry, Jonah staggers to his feet, and stumbling to the deck, grasps a shroud, to look out upon the sea.
Clare knew this well; and often, in many a weary hour, he heard that slender, childish voice calling him to the skies, and saw that little hand pointing to him the way of life; but a heavy lethargy of sorrow lay on him,--he could not arise.
Becky roused up from her lethargy of distress and showed good interest in the proceedings.
She generally lies in a kind of lethargy all the afternoon, and wakes up about six or seven.
He had gradually dropped to the floor, and lay there in a lethargy, worn out.
Both became overshadowed by a new and indefinable horror; and when I awoke - or rather when I shook off the lethargy that bound me in my chair- my whole frame thrilled with objectless and unintelligible fear.
What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom or their lack of imagination.
The shock of the overturn was so violent that the young countess, roused from her lethargy, threw off her coverings and rose.
I think that the digression of my thoughts must have done me good, for when I got back to bed I found a lethargy creeping over me.
I heard a slight scraping at the fence, and rousing myself from the lethargy that had fallen upon me, I looked down and saw him dimly, clambering over the palings.
A cry more prolonged than the others and ending in a series of groans effectually roused me from my drowsy lethargy.