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let 1

v. let, let·ting, lets
1. To give permission or opportunity to; allow: I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house. See Usage Note at leave1.
2. To cause to; make: Let the news be known.
a. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a command, request, or proposal: Let's finish the job! Let x equal y.
b. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a warning or threat: Just let her try!
4. To permit to enter, proceed, or depart: let the dog in.
5. To release from or as if from confinement: let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp.
6. To rent or lease: let rooms.
7. To award, especially after bids have been submitted: let the construction job to a new firm.
1. To become rented or leased.
2. To be or become assigned, as to a contractor.
Phrasal Verbs:
let down
1. To cause to come down gradually; lower: let down the sails.
2. To withdraw support from; forsake.
3. To fail to meet the expectations of; disappoint.
let on
1. To allow to be known; admit: Don't let on that you know me.
2. To pretend.
let out
1. To come to a close; end: School let out early. The play let out at 10:30.
2. To make known; reveal: Who let that story out?
3. To increase the size of (a garment, for example): let out a coat.
let up
1. To slow down; diminish: didn't let up in their efforts.
2. To become less severe or intense: The rain let up.
let alone
Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
let go
To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
let off on Informal
To cause to diminish, as in pressure; ease up on: Let off on the gas so that we do not exceed the speed limit.
let (one's) hair down
To drop one's reserve or inhibitions.
let (someone) have it Informal
1. To beat, strike, or shoot at someone.
2. To scold or punish.
let (someone) in on
1. To reveal (a secret) to someone: They finally let me in on their plans.
2. To allow someone to participate in (something).
let up on
To be or become more lenient with: Why don't you let up on the poor child?

[Middle English leten, from Old English lǣtan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let 2

1. Something that hinders; an obstacle: free to investigate without let or hindrance.
2. Sports An invalid stroke in tennis and other net games that requires a replay.
tr.v. let·ted or let, let·ting, lets Archaic
To hinder or obstruct.

[Middle English lette, from letten, to hinder, from Old English lettan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]


n acronym for
(Commerce) Local Exchange and Trading System: an economic system in which members of a community exchange goods and services using a cashless local currency


contraction of let us.
usage: See contraction, let1.
References in classic literature ?
Lena Lingard lets me kiss her,' I retorted, `and I'm not half as fond of her as I am of you.
He is very careful and loving, and hardly lets me stir without special direction.
It lets in the wind and rain, and the Snow, too, in the garret and upper chambers, in winter-time, but it never lets in the sunshine.
Who's afraid of him, except the old governor who daresn't catch him and put him in double-darbies, as he deserves, but lets him go about kidnapping people; aye, and signed a bond with him, that all the people the devil kidnapped, he'd roast for him?
And so at last," said she, "I was bought by a man who keeps a number of cabs and horses, and lets them out.
Yer see," said Sam, "yer see, Andy, if any such thing should happen as that Mas'r Haley's horse should begin to act contrary, and cut up, you and I jist lets go of our'n to help him, and we'll help him--oh yes
The king took the hand with a poorly disguised reluctance, and let go of it as willingly as a lady lets go of a fish; all of which had a good effect, for it was mistaken for an embarrassment natural to one who was being called upon by greatness.
Here's what the law does: The law takes a man worth six thousand dollars and up'ards, and jams him into an old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes that ain't fitten for a hog.
Anybody can find the sort he prefers, here, and he just lets the others alone, and they let him alone.
Boys, I move that he keeps still and lets this human philopena snip you out a speech.
He lets me, and so does his pap's nigger man, Uncle Jake.
Elton should have aspiredMiss Woodhouse lets me chatter on, so goodhumouredly.