letting


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Related to letting: Blood letting

let 1

 (lĕt)
v. let, let·ting, lets
v.tr.
1. To give permission or opportunity to; allow: I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house. See Usage Note at leave1.
2. To cause to; make: Let the news be known.
3.
a. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a command, request, or proposal: Let's finish the job! Let x equal y.
b. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a warning or threat: Just let her try!
4. To permit to enter, proceed, or depart: let the dog in.
5. To release from or as if from confinement: let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp.
6. To rent or lease: let rooms.
7. To award, especially after bids have been submitted: let the construction job to a new firm.
v.intr.
1. To become rented or leased.
2. To be or become assigned, as to a contractor.
Phrasal Verbs:
let down
1. To cause to come down gradually; lower: let down the sails.
2. To withdraw support from; forsake.
3. To fail to meet the expectations of; disappoint.
let on
1. To allow to be known; admit: Don't let on that you know me.
2. To pretend.
let out
1. To come to a close; end: School let out early. The play let out at 10:30.
2. To make known; reveal: Who let that story out?
3. To increase the size of (a garment, for example): let out a coat.
let up
1. To slow down; diminish: didn't let up in their efforts.
2. To become less severe or intense: The rain let up.
Idioms:
let alone
Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
let go
To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
let off on Informal
To cause to diminish, as in pressure; ease up on: Let off on the gas so that we do not exceed the speed limit.
let (one's) hair down
To drop one's reserve or inhibitions.
let (someone) have it Informal
1. To beat, strike, or shoot at someone.
2. To scold or punish.
let (someone) in on
1. To reveal (a secret) to someone: They finally let me in on their plans.
2. To allow someone to participate in (something).
let up on
To be or become more lenient with: Why don't you let up on the poor child?

[Middle English leten, from Old English lǣtan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

let 2

 (lĕt)
n.
1. Something that hinders; an obstacle: free to investigate without let or hindrance.
2. Sports An invalid stroke in tennis and other net games that requires a replay.
tr.v. let·ted or let, let·ting, lets Archaic
To hinder or obstruct.

[Middle English lette, from letten, to hinder, from Old English lettan; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

letting

(ˈlɛtɪŋ)
n
1. (Commerce) Brit the act of allowing someone to use one's house or land in exchange for money
2. (Medicine) another name for blood-letting1
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.letting - property that is leased or rented out or letletting - property that is leased or rented out or let
belongings, property, holding - something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone; "that hat is my property"; "he is a man of property";
car rental, hire car, rent-a-car, self-drive, u-drive, you-drive - a rented car; "she picked up a hire car at the airport and drove to her hotel"
sublease, sublet - a lease from one lessee to another
Translations

letting

[ˈletɪŋ] Narrendamiento m, alquiler m

letting

n (esp Brit) → Vermieten nt; he’s in the letting businesser ist in der Wohnungsbranche

letting

[ˈlɛtɪŋ] naffitto
References in classic literature ?
I'll do all I can to help Tom, without letting him know that I know.
There were no screens or window-blinds in the house, and all the doors and windows stood wide open, letting in flies and sunshine alike.
Pontellier finally lit a cigar and began to smoke, letting the paper drag idly from his hand.
whispered the scout, when they had gained a little distance from the place, and letting his rifle fall into the hollow of his arm again; "I soon saw that he was one of them uneasy Frenchers; and well for him it was that his speech was friendly and his wishes kind, or a place might have been found for his bones among those of his countrymen.
At first he meant to repaper the room, but afterwards he said that I was letting it get the better of me, and that nothing was worse for a nervous patient than to give way to such fancies.
Carr, and just because he don't want to distress that intelligent gentleman by letting him see he's dead broke--for him to go and demean himself and Devil's Ford by rushing away and hiring out as a Mexican vaquero on Mexican wages?
This last act Hepzibah now performed, letting the bar fall with what smote upon her excited nerves as a most astounding clatter.
cried old Roger Chillingworth, letting the lurid fire of his heart blaze out before her eyes.
I now saw that I had been asked for a service admirable and difficult; and there would be a greatness in letting it be seen--oh, in the right quarter
As for Peleg, after letting off his rage as he had, there seemed no more left in him, and he, too, sat down like a lamb, though he twitched a little as if still nervously agitated.
cried Ahab, suddenly letting out his suspended breath.
He was very particular in letting out and taking in the straps, to fit my head comfortably; then he brought a saddle, but it was not broad enough for my back; he saw it in a minute and went for another, which fitted nicely.