lexical meaning


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lexical meaning

n
(Linguistics) the meaning of a word in relation to the physical world or to abstract concepts, without reference to any sentence in which the word may occur. Compare grammatical meaning, content word

lex′ical mean′ing


n.
the meaning of a base morpheme or word, independent of its use within a construction. Compare grammatical meaning.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lexical meaning - the meaning of a content word that depends on the nonlinguistic concepts it is used to express
content word, open-class word - a word to which an independent meaning can be assigned
meaning, signification, import, significance - the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
References in periodicals archive ?
There exists a connection between the structure of a term and its lexical meaning.
In other words, word-formation is the processual part, whereas lexical meaning constitutes the result of such a process.
Her notion of lexical meaning is encapsulated in the theory of 'Organisational Lexical Semantics' (OLS).
If the lexical meaning of the noun encodes a scale along a dimension, then the pseudopartitive construction is compatible with the noun, as in the case of 'warmth, heat'.
It means that the relation between the inner form and lexical meaning is manifested in concordance of the only one semantic notion.
The Hebrew stem ZNH (as translated into the Latin alphabet) has a generally accepted lexical meaning of "commit fornication, be/act as a harlot.
In some cases, it is not only the semantic type of the nominalization that changes in the AMC expression, but its lexical meaning more generally.
The morphemes are not polysemous, as one of the principles that characterises agglutinating languages is the one-to-one mapping of form and meaning (Kosch, 2006:135), and each morpheme therefore conveys one grammatical category or distinct lexical meaning.
A dynamically construed approach to lexical representation is consistent with a number of accounts of lexical meaning.
Benveniste further suggests that besides having the syntactic function and morphological marks of a verb, to be originally had a definite lexical meaning, approximating "to exist, to have real substance," before it fell -- "at the end of a long historical development -- to the rank of the copula" (138).
Professor Worthen pens a kind of high-toned, jejune, academic blather that flits around, and occasionally lights or sits upon lexical meaning.
He once again stresses the important claim that singular expressions are tools for communicating individual concepts, from which it follows that 'the interpretation of singular expressions is constrained to concepts which are taken to denote individuals' (206), and that 'whereas lexical meaning is sensitive to the distinction between individual and other concepts, the truth-conditions of thought are sensitive to distinctions within the class of individual concepts, distinctions to which linguistic meaning is blind' (209).