lexicography

(redirected from lexicographically)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

lex·i·cog·ra·phy

 (lĕk′sĭ-kŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The process or work of writing, editing, or compiling a dictionary.


lex′i·co·graph′ic (-kə-grăf′ĭk), lex′i·co·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
lex′i·co·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

lexicography

(ˌlɛksɪˈkɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Linguistics) the process or profession of writing or compiling dictionaries
ˌlexiˈcographer n
lexicographic, ˌlexicoˈgraphical adj
ˌlexicoˈgraphically adv

lex•i•cog•ra•phy

(ˌlɛk sɪˈkɒg rə fi)

n.
1. the writing, editing, or compiling of dictionaries.
2. the principles and procedures involved in writing, editing, or compiling dictionaries.
[1670–80]
lex`i•co•graph′ic (-kəˈgræf ɪk) lex`i•co•graph′i•cal, adj.
lex`i•co•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

lexicography

the writing or compiling of dictionaries. — lexicographer, n. — lexicographic, lexicographical, adj.
See also: Language
the writing, editing, or compiling of dictionaries. — lexicographer, n. — lexicographic, lexicographical, adj.
See also: Linguistics

lexicography

1. The art or practice of compiling or writing dictionaries.
2. The art or practice of writing or compiling dictionaries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lexicography - the act of writing dictionaries
authorship, penning, writing, composition - the act of creating written works; "writing was a form of therapy for him"; "it was a matter of disputed authorship"
Translations
lexikografie
leksikografija
lexikográfiaszótárírásszótártudomány
leksikografija
lexicografie

lexicography

[ˌleksɪˈkɒgrəfɪ] Nlexicografía f

lexicography

[ˌlɛksɪˈkɒgrəfi] nlexicographie f

lexicography

nLexikografie f

lexicography

[ˌlɛksɪˈkɒgrəfɪ] nlessicografia
References in periodicals archive ?
It is immediate to see that the monomial in [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with the lexicographically largest evaluation is obtained as follows: it has letters [b.
X contains Fourier transform of the reference images lexicographically re-ordered and placed along each column.
Judge Richard Posner articulated a high standard for trademark owners who desire to retain their marks: "A serious trademark holder is assiduous in endeavoring to convince dictionary editors, magazine and newspaper editors, journalists and columnists, judges, and other lexicographically influential persons to avoid using his trademark to denote anything other than the trademarked good or service.
Lexicographically designated as lifeless, unpopulated areas, deserts, which cover more than one quarter of earth's surface, have more than 600 million people living in them.
The dictionary is based on Jewish Babylonian Aramaic sources and it is the first time that Eastern and Western Aramaic have been separated lexicographically.
Liudmila Kovtun, who studied the glossaries lexicographically more thoroughly than anyone else, raised another point.
Among their topics are English-Russian learner's lexicography in the 16th to 21st centuries, a new generation of specialized dictionaries to Shakespeare's work, gender nominations of people as viewed lexicographically, documenting a section of the mosaic of South African English, the Anichkov theory of idiomatics and bilingual dictionaries of idioms and cliches, the systematization and typology of terms in Weblish, terminology of the European Union challenging the terminological and terminographic principles, phonetic terminology as a representation of a special subject sphere, and terms in colloquial use.
in the Neumann case We can order the basis lexicographically.
n]) with [absolute value of p] [less than or equal to] r will be lexicographically ordered.
To do this, we note that combinations can be lexicographically ordered and the position of a combination [LAMBDA] can be used as its numerical hash for accessing the array; see Knuth's Theorem L (4).
According to the definition of minimum DFS code [4,6], the minimum DFS code of Q will be lexicographically less than P or be in the form of ([e.
As a result, loyalty, the lexicographically top criterion in so many earlier appointments, was suddenly replaced by the criterion of choosing someone with a sufficiently short track record outside academia that he would raise no questions in confirmation hearings.