lexicon


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lex·i·con

 (lĕk′sĭ-kŏn′)
n. pl. lex·i·cons or lex·i·ca (-kə)
1. A dictionary.
2. A stock of terms used in a particular profession, subject, or style; a vocabulary: the lexicon of surrealist art.
3. Linguistics The morphemes of a language considered as a group.

[Medieval Latin, from Greek lexikon (biblion), word(book), from neuter of lexikos, of words, from lexis, word, from legein, to speak; see leg- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

lexicon

(ˈlɛksɪkən)
n
1. (Linguistics) a dictionary, esp one of an ancient language such as Greek or Hebrew
2. (Linguistics) a list of terms relating to a particular subject
3. (Linguistics) the vocabulary of a language or of an individual
4. (Linguistics) linguistics the set of all the morphemes of a language
[C17: New Latin, from Greek lexikon, n use of lexikos relating to words, from Greek lexis word, from legein to speak]

lex•i•con

(ˈlɛk sɪˌkɒn, -kən)

n., pl. -ca (-kə)
-cons.
1. a wordbook or dictionary, esp. of Greek, Latin, or Hebrew.
2. the vocabulary of a particular language, field, social class, person, etc.
3. the total inventory of words or morphemes in a given language.
[1595–1605; < Medieval Latin < Medieval Greek, Greek lexikón, n. use of neuter of lexikós of words]

lexicon

1. A dictionary or glossary.
2. A dictionary or a list of vocabulary used in a particular field.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lexicon - a language user's knowledge of wordslexicon - a language user's knowledge of words
cognition, knowledge, noesis - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
2.lexicon - a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about themlexicon - a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about them
dictionary entry, lexical entry - the entry in a dictionary of information about a word
wordbook - a reference book containing words (usually with their meanings)
bilingual dictionary - a dictionary giving equivalent words in two languages
collegiate dictionary, desk dictionary - an abridged dictionary of a size convenient to hold in the hand
etymological dictionary - a dictionary giving the historical origins of each word
gazetteer - a geographical dictionary (as at the back of an atlas)
learner's dictionary, school dictionary - a dictionary specially written for those learning a foreign language
little dictionary, pocket dictionary - a dictionary that is small enough to carry in your pocket
spell-checker, spelling checker - an electronic dictionary in a word processor that can be used to catch misspelled words
unabridged, unabridged dictionary - a dictionary that has not been shortened by the omitting terms or definitions; a comprehensive dictionary

lexicon

noun vocabulary, dictionary, glossary, word list, wordbook a lexicon of slang

lexicon

noun
1. An alphabetical list of words often defined or translated:
2. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
3. All the words of a language:
Translations
مُعْجَم
slovník
leksikon
orðabókorðasafnorîabók
leksikonasžodynas
leksikons, vārdnīca
lexikón

lexicon

[ˈleksɪkən] Nléxico m

lexicon

[ˈlɛksɪkən] n
(= terminology) → lexique m
(= list of words) → lexique m
(= dictionary) → lexique m

lexicon

nWörterbuch nt, → Lexikon nt; (in linguistics) → Lexikon nt

lexicon

[ˈlɛksɪkn] nlessico

lexicon

(ˈleksikən) , ((American) -kon) noun
a dictionary.
References in classic literature ?
A stunning blow from the big Greek lexicon, which an old fellow in a black gown fired at him," said Ned.
Certainly it needs a definition, and should be incorporated into the Lexicon.
And here be it said, that whenever it has been convenient to consult one in the course of these dissertations, I have invariably used a huge quarto edition of Johnson, expressly purchased for that purpose; because that famous lexicographer's uncommon personal bulk more fitted him to compile a lexicon to be used by a whale author like me.
Mortally: after all, it's tough work fagging away at a language with no master but a lexicon.
In Sophocles' Lexicon I find a reference to Chrysostom(l, 242, A.
Malthus and Ricardo quite omit it; the Annual Register is silent; in the Conversations' Lexicon it is not set down; the President's Message, the Queen's Speech, have not mentioned it; and yet it is never nothing.
There it was that he had grown up, on the missal and the lexicon.
I would have him in an edition wholly Spanish from beginning to end, and I would fight my way through him single-handed, with only such aid as I must borrow from a lexicon.
I'll be better able to tell you when I find out what it is," said Priscilla, casting aside a Greek lexicon and taking up Stella's letter.
All of Daylight's horse knowledge and horse sense was called into play, while Bob, in turn, worked every trick in his lexicon.
He lived in the 5th century, and compiled a Greek Lexicon.
And in the South Seas garnered a better vocabulary from the lexicon of Love," Percival was quick on the uptake.