liberalism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to liberalism: Marxism, conservatism

lib·er·al·ism

 (lĭb′ər-ə-lĭz′əm, lĭb′rə-)
n.
1. The state or quality of being liberal.
2.
a. A political theory founded on the natural goodness of humans and the autonomy of the individual and favoring civil and political liberties, government by law with the consent of the governed, and protection from arbitrary authority.
b. often Liberalism The tenets or policies of a Liberal party.
3. An economic theory in favor of laissez-faire, the free market, and the gold standard.
4. Liberalism
a. A 19th-century Protestant movement that favored free intellectual inquiry, stressed the ethical and humanitarian content of Christianity, and de-emphasized dogmatic theology.
b. A 19th-century Roman Catholic movement that favored political democracy and ecclesiastical reform but was theologically orthodox.

lib′er·al·ist n.
lib′er·al·is′tic (-lĭs′tĭk) adj.

liberalism

(ˈlɪbərəˌlɪzəm; ˈlɪbrə-)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) liberal opinions, practices, or politics
2. (Protestantism) a movement in modern Protestantism that rejects biblical authority
ˈliberalist n, adj
ˌliberalˈistic adj

lib•er•al•ism

(ˈlɪb ər əˌlɪz əm, ˈlɪb rə-)

n.
1. the quality or state of being liberal, as in behavior or attitude.
2. a political and social philosophy advocating individual freedom, representational forms of government, progress and reform, and protection of civil liberties.
3. (sometimes cap.) the principles and practices of a liberal party in politics.
[1810–20]
lib′er•al•ist, n., adj.
lib`er•al•is′tic, adj.

liberalism

1. a political or social philosophy advocating the f reedom of the individual, parliamentary legislatures, governmental assurances of civil liberties and individual rights, and nonviolent modification of institutions to permit continued individual and social progress.
2. the principles and practice of a liberal political party. — liberalist, n., adj.liberalistic, adj.
See also: Politics
a movement in modern Protestantism that emphasizes freedom from tradition and authority, the adjustment of religious beliefs to scientific conceptions, and the spiritual and ethical content of Christianity. — liberalist, n., adj. — liberalistic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liberalism - a political orientation that favors social progress by reform and by changing laws rather than by revolution
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
neoliberalism - a political orientation originating in the 1960s; blends liberal political views with an emphasis on economic growth
2.liberalism - an economic theory advocating free competition and a self-regulating market
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)

liberalism

noun progressivism, radicalism, humanitarianism, libertarianism, freethinking, latitudinarianism He was concerned over growing liberalism in the Church.
Quotations
"By liberalism I don't mean the creed of any party or any century. I mean a generosity of spirit, a tolerance of others, an attempt to comprehend otherness, a commitment to the rule of law, a high ideal of the worth and dignity of man, a repugnance for authoritarianism and a love of freedom" [Alan Paton Lecture at Yale University]
Translations
ليبرالية
liberalizam
liberalismmarknadsliberalismnyliberalism

liberalism

[ˈlɪbərəlɪzəm] Nliberalismo m

liberalism

[ˈlɪbərəlɪzəm] n
(POLITICS)libéralisme m
(= tolerance) → libéralisme m

liberalism

nLiberalität f; Liberalism (Pol) → der Liberalismus

liberalism

[ˈlɪbrəˌlɪzm] nliberalismo
References in classic literature ?
Liberalism is not a sin, it is a necessary part of a great whole, which whole would collapse and fall to pieces without it.
If there was a reason for his preferring liberal to conservative views, which were held also by many of his circle, it arose not from his considering liberalism more rational, but from its being in closer accordance with his manner of life.
And all this was found in Alexander I; all this had been prepared by innumerable so-called chances in his life: his education, his early liberalism, the advisers who surrounded him, and by Austerlitz, and Tilsit, and Erfurt.
But he had left the army, so that his reputation for gallantry mainly depended now on his fighting Liberalism in the House of Commons.
By this, the long wished-for opportunity was offered to "True" Socialism of confronting the political movement with the Socialist demands, of hurling the traditional anathemas against liberalism, against representative government, against bourgeois competition, bourgeois freedom of the press, bourgeois legislation, bourgeois liberty and equality, and of preaching to the masses that they had nothing to gain, and everything to lose, by this bourgeois movement.
The despotism and hatred of Liberalism which animated the Continental Governments had had the effect of driving to our shores a number of men who might have made excellent citizens were they not soured by the recollection of all that they had undergone.
Miss Bartlett's recent liberalism oozed away at the question.
It is impossible to doubt but that the extreme liberalism of these countries must ultimately lead to good results.
At the outbreak of the Revolution Burke was already sixty, and the inevitable tendency of his mind was away from the enthusiastic liberalism which had so strongly moved him in behalf of the Americans and the Hindoos.
But modern Liberalism rashly made war upon the prosperous government of the Bourbons, by means of ideas which, should they triumph, would be the ruin of France and of the Liberals themselves.
In science, development, thought, invention, ideals, aims, liberalism, judgment, experience and everything, everything, everything, we are still in the preparatory class at school.
Buyers of the Middlemarch newspapers found themselves in an anomalous position: during the agitation on the Catholic Question many had given up the "Pioneer"--which had a motto from Charles James Fox and was in the van of progress-- because it had taken Peel's side about the Papists, and had thus blotted its Liberalism with a toleration of Jesuitry and Baal; but they were ill-satisfied with the "Trumpet," which--since its blasts against Rome, and in the general flaccidity of the public mind (nobody knowing who would support whom)--had become feeble in its blowing.