liberty


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lib·er·ty

 (lĭb′ər-tē)
n. pl. lib·er·ties
1. The condition of being free from confinement, servitude, or forced labor.
2.
a. The condition of being free from oppressive restriction or control by a government or other power.
b. A right to engage in certain actions without control or interference by a government or other power: the liberties protected by the Bill of Rights.
3. The right or power to act as one chooses: "Her upcountry isolation ... gave her the liberty to be what she wanted to be, free of the pressure of spotlights and literary fashions" (Lucinda Franks).
4. often liberties A deliberate departure from what is proper, accepted, or prudent, especially:
a. A breach or overstepping of propriety or social convention: "I'd leave her with a little kiss on the cheek—I never took liberties" (Harold Pinter).
b. A departure from strict compliance: took several liberties with the recipe.
c. A deviation from accepted truth or known fact: a historical novel that takes liberties with chronology.
d. An unwarranted risk; a chance: took foolish liberties on the ski slopes.
5. A period, usually short, during which a sailor is authorized to go ashore.
Idioms:
at liberty
1. Not in confinement or under constraint; free.
2. Entitled or permitted to do something: We found ourselves at liberty to explore the grounds.
take the liberty
To dare (to do something) on one's own initiative or without asking permission: I took the liberty to send you these pictures of my vacation.

[Middle English liberte, from Old French, from Latin lībertās, from līber, free; see leudh- in Indo-European roots.]

liberty

(ˈlɪbətɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the power of choosing, thinking, and acting for oneself; freedom from control or restriction
2. the right or privilege of access to a particular place; freedom
3. (often plural) a social action regarded as being familiar, forward, or improper
4. (often plural) an action that is unauthorized or unwarranted in the circumstances: he took liberties with the translation.
5. (Nautical Terms)
a. authorized leave granted to a sailor
b. (as modifier): liberty man; liberty boat.
6. at liberty free, unoccupied, or unrestricted
7. take liberties to be overfamiliar or overpresumptuous (with)
8. take the liberty to venture or presume (to do something)
[C14: from Old French liberté, from Latin lībertās, from līber free]

lib•er•ty

(ˈlɪb ər ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. freedom from arbitrary or despotic government or control.
2. freedom from external or foreign rule; independence.
3. freedom from control, interference, obligation, restriction, etc.
4. freedom from captivity, confinement, or physical restraint.
5.
a. permission granted to a sailor to go ashore, usu. for less than 24 hours.
b. the time spent ashore.
6. freedom or right to frequent or use a place: The visitors were given the liberty of the city.
7. unwarranted or impertinent freedom in action or speech, or a form or instance of it: to take liberties.
8. a female figure personifying freedom from despotism.
Idioms:
at liberty,
a. free from captivity or restraint.
b. free to do or be as specified.
[1325–75; Middle English liberte < Middle French < Latin lībertās=līber free + -tās -ty2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liberty - immunity from arbitrary exercise of authority: political independenceliberty - immunity from arbitrary exercise of authority: political independence
self-determination, self-government, self-rule - government of a political unit by its own people
independence, independency - freedom from control or influence of another or others
2.liberty - freedom of choice; "liberty of opinion"; "liberty of worship"; "liberty--perfect liberty--to think or feel or do just as one pleases"; "at liberty to choose whatever occupation one wishes"
freedom - the condition of being free; the power to act or speak or think without externally imposed restraints
licence, license - freedom to deviate deliberately from normally applicable rules or practices (especially in behavior or speech)
latitude - freedom from normal restraints in conduct; "the new freedom in movies and novels"; "allowed his children considerable latitude in how they spent their money"
licence, license - excessive freedom; lack of due restraint; "when liberty becomes license dictatorship is near"- Will Durant; "the intolerable license with which the newspapers break...the rules of decorum"- Edmund Burke
discretion - freedom to act or judge on one's own
run - unrestricted freedom to use; "he has the run of the house"
3.liberty - personal freedom from servitude or confinement or oppression
freedom - the condition of being free; the power to act or speak or think without externally imposed restraints
4.liberty - leave granted to a sailor or naval officer
leave, leave of absence - the period of time during which you are absent from work or duty; "a ten day's leave to visit his mother"
5.liberty - an act of undue intimacyliberty - an act of undue intimacy    
misbehavior, misbehaviour, misdeed - improper or wicked or immoral behavior

liberty

noun
1. independence, sovereignty, liberation, autonomy, immunity, self-determination, emancipation, self-government, self-rule Such a system would be a blow to the liberty of the people.
3. free, escaped, unlimited, at large, not confined, untied, on the loose, unchained, unbound There is no confirmation that he is at liberty.
4. able, free, allowed, permitted, entitled, authorized I'm not at liberty to say where it is, because the deal hasn't gone through yet.
take liberties or a liberty not show enough respect, show disrespect, act presumptuously, behave too familiarly, behave impertinently She knew she was taking a big liberty in doing this for him without his knowledge.
Quotations
"I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!" [Patrick Henry]
"Liberty is liberty, not equality or fairness or justice or human happiness or a quiet conscience" [Isaiah Berlin Two Concepts of Liberty]
"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure" [Thomas Jefferson]
"Liberty is precious - so precious that it must be rationed" [Lenin]
"Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it" [George Bernard Shaw Man and Superman]
"Liberty too must be limited in order to be possessed" [Edmund Burke Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol]
"The liberty of the individual must be thus far limited; he must not make himself a nuisance to other people" [John Stuart Mill On Liberty]

liberty

noun
1. The state of not being in confinement or servitude:
2. The condition of being politically free:
3. Departure from normal rules or procedures:
Translations
حُريَّة الكَلامحُريَّهحُريَّه، إطْلاق سَراح
svobodaopovážlivost
frihed
آزادی
vapaus
आज़ादी
sloboda
szabadság
frelsifrjálsræîivera nærgöngull; taka sér bessaleyfi
libertas
laisvėsleisti saupernelyg didelis laisvumas
brīvībafamiliaritātevaļība
libertate
opovážlivosť
svoboda
frihet
hürriyetküstahlıközgürlükserbestlikcüret
آزادی

liberty

[ˈlɪbətɪ]
A. N
1. (= freedom) → libertad f
individual/personal libertylibertad f individual/personal
to be at liberty (= free) → estar en libertad
to be at liberty to do sthtener libertad para hacer algo, ser libre de hacer algo
I'm not at liberty to say who it wasno puedo decir quién fue
2. (= presumption, impertinence) → atrevimiento m
that was rather a liberty on his parteso fue un atrevimiento por su parte
what a liberty!¡qué atrevimiento or descaro!
to take liberties with sb (= be cheeky) → tomarse libertades or demasiadas confianzas con algn; (sexually) → propasarse con algn
to take the liberty of doing sthtomarse la libertad de hacer algo
B. CPD liberty bodice (o.f.) Ncamiseta f interior

liberty

[ˈlɪbərti] n
(= freedom) → liberté f
to be at liberty [criminal] → être en liberté
to be at liberty to do sth → être libre de faire qch civil liberties
(= presumption) → liberté f
to take the liberty of doing sth → prendre la liberté de faire qch
to take liberties → prendre des libertés

liberty

n
Freiheit f; individual libertydie Freiheit des Einzelnen; basic libertiesGrundrechte pl; to set somebody at libertyjdn auf freien Fuß setzen; to be at liberty (criminal etc)frei herumlaufen; (= not busy)Zeit haben; to be at liberty to do something (= be permitted)etw tun dürfen; I am not at liberty to commentes ist mir nicht gestattet, darüber zu sprechen; you are at liberty to goes steht Ihnen frei zu gehen; is he at liberty to come?darf er kommen?
(= presumptuous action, behaviour) I have taken the liberty of giving your nameich habe mir erlaubt, Ihren Namen anzugeben; to take liberties with the truthes mit der Wahrheit nicht so genau nehmen; to take liberties with somebodysich jdm gegenüber Freiheiten herausnehmen; what a liberty! (inf)so eine Frechheit!

liberty

[ˈlɪbətɪ] nlibertà f inv
liberty of conscience → libertà di coscienza
at liberty (not detained) → in libertà
to be at liberty to do sth → essere libero/a di fare qc
to take the liberty of doing sth → prendersi la libertà di fare qc, permettersi di fare qc
to take liberties → prendersi delle libertà
what a liberty! (fam) → come ti permetti? (or si permette? )

liberty

(ˈlibəti) noun
1. freedom from captivity or from slavery. He ordered that all prisoners should be given their liberty.
2. freedom to do as one pleases. Children have a lot more liberty now than they used to.
3. (especially with take) too great freedom of speech or action. I think it was (taking) a liberty to ask her such a question!
ˈliberties noun plural
privileges, rights etc. civil liberties.
take the liberty of
to do without permission. I took the liberty of moving the papers from your desk – I hope you don't mind.

liberty

n. libertad;
to be at ___ totener ___ para.
References in classic literature ?
He was delighted, inquired who lived in this old castle, and was told that several captive princesses were kept there by a spell, and spun all day to lay up money to buy their liberty.
We'll do our best to win, and any one is at liberty to travel on the same steamer we are to take," added the young inventor, and his tone became more incisive.
As every word uttered by Natty Bumppo was not to be received as rigid truth, we took the liberty of putting the "Horican" into his mouth, as the substitute for "Lake George.
He begrudged to Isaacs & Sons the credit of having given Spear his liberty.
The Shawanese king took great notice of me, and treated me with profound respect, and entire friendship, often entrusting me to hunt at my liberty.
One moment, Miss Christie," said Dick lightly, as his thumb and finger relaxed in his waistcoat pocket over the only piece of money in the world that had remained to him after his extravagant purchase of Christie's saffrona rose, "one moment: in this yer monetary transaction, if you like, you are at liberty to use MY name.
In compliance with a whim of Clifford, as it troubled him to see them in confinement, they had been set at liberty, and now roamed at will about the garden; doing some little mischief, but hindered from escape by buildings on three sides, and the difficult peaks of a wooden fence on the other.
There was but one sane inference: someone had taken a liberty rather gross.
For three years and a half of my life I had had all the liberty I could wish for; but now, week after week, month after month, and no doubt year after year, I must stand up in a stable night and day except when I am wanted, and then I must be just as steady and quiet as any old horse who has worked twenty years.
Who will carry the good tidings to others, as I have carried them to him--priceless gift of liberty and light that is neither mine nor his, but is the heritage of the soul of man
During that period,--being much trusted and favored by his employer,--he had free liberty to come and go at discretion.
In other words, when a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize.