libidinous

(redirected from libidinously)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to libidinously: lasciviousness

li·bid·i·nous

 (lĭ-bĭd′n-əs)
adj.
Having or exhibiting lustful desires; lascivious.

[Middle English, from Old French libidineux, from Latin libīdinōsus, from libīdō, libīdin-, lust, desire; see libido.]

li·bid′i·nous·ly adv.
li·bid′i·nous·ness n.

libidinous

(lɪˈbɪdɪnəs)
adj
1. characterized by excessive sexual desire
2. of or relating to the libido
liˈbidinously adv
liˈbidinousness n

li•bid•i•nous

(lɪˈbɪd n əs)

adj.
full of lust; lustful; lewd; lascivious.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin libīdinōsus willful, lustful <libīdin-, s. of libīdō (see libido)]
li•bid′i•nous•ly, adv.
li•bid′i•nous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.libidinous - driven by lust; preoccupied with or exhibiting lustful desires; "libidinous orgies"
sexy - marked by or tending to arouse sexual desire or interest; "feeling sexy"; "sexy clothes"; "sexy poses"; "a sexy book"; "sexy jokes"

libidinous

adjective lustful, sensual, wanton, carnal, loose, randy (informal, chiefly Brit.), wicked, salacious, prurient, impure, debauched, lascivious, incontinent, lecherous, concupiscent, unchaste, ruttish He let his libidinous imagination run away with him.

libidinous

adjective
Feeling or devoted to sexual love or desire:
Translations
libidinosus
gašlusgeidulingas
libidinos

libidinous

[lɪˈbɪdɪnəs] ADJlibidinoso

libidinous

[lɪˈbɪdɪnəs] (literary) adjlibidineux/euse

libidinous

adjlüstern; person, behaviour alsotriebhaft; (Psych) urge, effectlibidinös

libidinous

[lɪˈbɪdɪnəs] adj (frm) → libidinoso/a

li·bid·i·nous

a. libidinoso-a, rel. al libido.
References in periodicals archive ?
American soprano Tamara Wilson made a charming, libidinously tempted Resalinde, the fast-rising Ambur Braid (alternating with Mireille Asselin) a coloratura-confident Adele and Laura Tucker, in the trouser role, a convincingly decadent Orlofsky.
Representative of the European lore that rendered "the uncertain continents"--Africa, Asia, and more relevantly, the Americas--"as libidinously eroticized" since the times of the conquest (McClintock 22), both postcards function as self-fulfilling prophesies.
27) Thus, the European and North American penchant to understand the rural cultures identified by anthropologists as being holistically or libidinously "primitive"--a penchant challenged (or, in the interpretation of some observers, abetted) by indigenist or folklore-centered artists who emphasized how participants in these cultures experienced modernity--was coupled with a suspicion that rural areas described by sociologists were "degenerate.