licentious


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li·cen·tious

 (lī-sĕn′shəs)
adj.
1. Lacking moral restraint, especially in sexual conduct.
2. Archaic Ignoring accepted rules or standards, as of prescriptive grammar.

[Latin licentiōsus, from licentia, freedom, license; see license.]

li·cen′tious·ly adv.
li·cen′tious·ness n.

licentious

(laɪˈsɛnʃəs)
adj
1. sexually unrestrained or promiscuous
2. rare showing disregard for convention
[C16: from Latin licentiōsus capricious, from licentia licence]
liˈcentiously adv
liˈcentiousness n

li•cen•tious

(laɪˈsɛn ʃəs)

adj.
1. sexually unrestrained; libertine.
2. unrestrained by law or general morality; immoral.
3. going beyond customary or proper bounds or limits.
[1525–35; < Latin licentiōsus unrestrained. See license, -ous]
li•cen′tious•ly, adv.
li•cen′tious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.licentious - lacking moral discipline; especially sexually unrestrained; "coarse and licentious men"
unchaste - not chaste; "unchaste conduct"

licentious

licentious

adjective
Translations

licentious

[laɪˈsenʃəs] ADJlicencioso

licentious

[laɪˈsɛnʃəs] adjlicencieux/euse

licentious

adjausschweifend, lasterhaft; behaviourunzüchtig; booksehr freizügig; looklüstern

licentious

[laɪˈsɛnʃəs] adj (frm) → licenzioso/a
References in classic literature ?
For the opposite reason, Prince John hated and contemned the few Saxon families of consequence which subsisted in England, and omitted no opportunity of mortifying and affronting them; being conscious that his person and pretensions were disliked by them, as well as by the greater part of the English commons, who feared farther innovation upon their rights and liberties, from a sovereign of John's licentious and tyrannical disposition.
I will first know what it is that the bold licentious eyes of Lothario have seen in me that could have encouraged him to reveal to me a design so base as that which he has disclosed regardless of his friend and of my honour.
The inhabitants of the Atlantic frontier are all of them deeply interested in this provision for naval protection, and if they have hitherto been suffered to sleep quietly in their beds; if their property has remained safe against the predatory spirit of licentious adventurers; if their maritime towns have not yet been compelled to ransom themselves from the terrors of a conflagration, by yielding to the exactions of daring and sudden invaders, these instances of good fortune are not to be ascribed to the capacity of the existing government for the protection of those from whom it claims allegiance, but to causes that are fugitive and fallacious.
To them the whole sex, from queens of France to milliners, are essentially depraved, licentious, intriguing, not a little rascally, fundamentally deceitful, and incapable of thought about anything but trifles.
Immoral, licentious, anarchical, unscientific -- call them by what names you will -- yet, from an aesthetic point of view, those ancient days of the Colour Revolt were the glorious childhood of Art in Flatland -- a childhood, alas, that never ripened into manhood, nor even reached the blossom of youth.
Some report him to have fallen a victim to disease, brought on by his licentious life; others assert that he was murdered in a feud among the Crows.
She makes no secret of them, and has, in fact, elaborated a complete system of licentious behaviour.
Libels and licentious discourses against the state, when they are frequent and open; and in like sort, false news often running up and down, to the disadvantage of the state, and hastily embraced; are amongst the signs of troubles.
The drink had now begun to take noticeable effect upon most of them, with the result that they were beginning to give themselves up to utter and licentious abandon.
He heard his sister's sufferings derided, and her virtuous conduct jeered at and brutally misconstrued; he heard her name bandied from mouth to mouth, and herself made the subject of coarse and insolent wagers, free speech, and licentious jesting.
Of Dryden's numerous comedies and 'tragi-comedies' (serious plays with a sub-action of comedy) it may be said summarily that some of them were among the best of their time but that they were as licentious as all the others.
And then he got into the company of a more refined, licentious sort of people, and taking to all their wanton ways rushed into the opposite extreme from an abhorrence of his father's meanness.