lifelike


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life·like

 (līf′līk′)
adj.
Accurately representing real life: a lifelike statue. See Synonyms at vivid.

life′like′ness n.

lifelike

(ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk)
adj
closely resembling or representing life
ˈlifeˌlikeness n

life•like

(ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk)

adj.
resembling or simulating real life: a lifelike portrait.
[1605–15]
life′like`ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lifelike - evoking lifelike images within the mindlifelike - evoking lifelike images within the mind; "pictorial poetry and prose"; "graphic accounts of battle"; "a lifelike portrait"; "a vivid description"
realistic - aware or expressing awareness of things as they really are; "a realistic description"; "a realistic view of the possibilities"; "a realistic appraisal of our chances"; "the actors tried to create a realistic portrayal of the Africans"
2.lifelike - free from artificiality; "a lifelike pose"; "a natural reaction"
unaffected - free of artificiality; sincere and genuine; "an unaffected grace"

lifelike

lifelike

adjective
1. Accurately representing what is depicted or described:
2. Described verbally in sharp and accurate detail:
Translations
نابِض بالحَياه
živý
livagtig
eins og lifandi
canlı gibi

lifelike

[ˈlaɪflaɪk] ADJnatural; (= seemingly real) → que parece vivo
her photo is so lifelikela foto es el vivo retrato de ella

lifelike

[ˈlaɪflaɪk] adj [doll, dummy] → réaliste; [painting] → ressemblant(e)

lifelike

[ˈlaɪfˌlaɪk] adjche sembra vero/a, realistico/a

life

(laif) plural lives (laivz) noun
1. the quality belonging to plants and animals which distinguishes them from rocks, minerals etc and things which are dead. Doctors are fighting to save the child's life.
2. the period between birth and death. He had a long and happy life.
3. liveliness. She was full of life and energy.
4. a manner of living. She lived a life of ease and idleness.
5. the period during which any particular state exists. He had many different jobs during his working life.
6. living things. It is now believed that there may be life on Mars; animal life.
7. the story of a life. He has written a life of Churchill.
8. life imprisonment. He was given life for murder.
ˈlifeless adjective
1. dead. a lifeless body.
2. not lively; uninteresting. The actress gave a lifeless performance.
ˈlifelike adjective
like a living person, animal etc. The statue was very lifelike; a lifelike portrait.
life-and-ˈdeath adjective
serious and deciding between life and death. a life-and-death struggle.
ˈlifebelt noun
a ring or belt filled with air or made of a material which floats, for keeping a person afloat.
ˈlifeboat noun
a boat for saving shipwrecked people.
ˈlifebuoy noun
a buoy intended to support a person in the water till he can be rescued.
ˈlife-cycle noun
the various stages through which a living thing passes. the life-cycle of the snail.
life expectancy
the (average) length of time a person can expect to live.
ˈlifeguard noun
a person employed to protect and rescue swimmers at a swimming-pool, beach etc.
ˈlife-jacket noun
a sleeveless jacket filled with material that will float, for keeping a person afloat.
ˈlifeline noun
a rope for support in dangerous operations or thrown to rescue a drowning person.
ˈlifelong adjective
lasting the whole length of a life. a lifelong friendship.
ˈlife-saving noun
the act or skill of rescuing people from drowning. The boy is being taught life-saving.
ˈlife-size(d) adjective, adverb
(of a copy, drawing etc) as large as the original. a life-sized statue.
ˈlifetime noun
the period of a person's life. He saw many changes in his lifetime.
as large as life
in person; actually. I went to the party and there was John as large as life.
bring to life
to make lively or interesting. His lectures really brought the subject to life.
come to life
to become lively or interesting. The play did not come to life until the last act.
for life
until death. They became friends for life.
the life and soul of the party
a person who is very active, enthusiastic, amusing etc at a party.
not for the life of me
not even if it was necessary in order to save my life. I couldn't for the life of me remember his name!
not on your life!
certainly not!. `Will you get married?' `Not on your life!'
take life
to kill. It is a sin to take life.
take one's life
to kill oneself.
take one's life in one's hands
to take the risk of being killed.
to the life
exactly (like). When he put on that uniform, he was Napoleon to the life.
References in classic literature ?
But it would be much more lifelike if it were properly dressed.
When a moment later he recognized Tarzan it was with difficulty that they could convince him that his sorrow had not unbalanced his mind, for with the other members of the party he had been so thoroughly convinced that the ape-man was dead it was a problem to reconcile the conviction with the very lifelike appearance of Jane's "forest god.
I now began to reason that my situation was in the last degree serious, dream or no dream; for I knew by past experience of the lifelike intensity of dreams, that to be burned to death, even in a dream, would be very far from being a jest, and was a thing to be avoided, by any means, fair or foul, that I could contrive.
This mouth Ojo considered very artistic and lifelike, and Margolotte was pleased when the boy praised it.
She was determined, therefore, to contrive as lifelike a scarecrow as ever was seen, and to finish it immediately, from top to toe, so that it should begin its sentinel's duty that very morning.
They associated in her mind, the parrot becoming sanctified through the neighbourhood of the Holy Ghost, and the latter becoming more lifelike in her eyes, and more comprehensible.
As they approached more closely they saw that the lifelike figures were coated with dust, but that otherwise the skin was in as fine a state of preservation as the most recent of I-Gos' groups, and then they heard the door of the chamber they had quitted open and knew that the searchers were close upon them.
Against this tendency, on the other hand, the persistent instinct for realism provided a partial antidote; the Vices are often very lifelike rascals, abstract only in name.
Had Clifford, every time that he emerged out of dreams so lifelike, undergone the torture of transformation from a boy into an old and broken man, the daily recurrence of the shock would have been too much to bear.
When Don Quixote saw it, rendered in such lifelike style that one would have said Christ was speaking and Paul answering, "This," he said, "was in his time the greatest enemy that the Church of God our Lord had, and the greatest champion it will ever have; a knight-errant in life, a steadfast saint in death, an untiring labourer in the Lord's vineyard, a teacher of the Gentiles, whose school was heaven, and whose instructor and master was Jesus Christ himself.
Beneath this cloud the eyes had a peculiar glare, which was almost lifelike.
There was a more or less lifelike illustration of Bolgani in colors and in a cage, with many remarkable looking Tarmangani standing against a rail and peering curiously at the snarling brute.