lifting


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Related to lifting: Lifting the corporate veil

lift

 (lĭft)
v. lift·ed, lift·ing, lifts
v.tr.
1.
a. To direct or carry from a lower to a higher position; raise: lift one's eyes; lifted the suitcase.
b. To transport by air: The helicopter lifted the entire team to the meet.
2.
a. To revoke by taking back; rescind: lifted the embargo.
b. To bring an end to (a blockade or siege) by removing forces.
3. To cease (artillery fire) in an area.
4.
a. To raise in condition, rank, or esteem: work that lifted her in the eyes of her colleagues.
b. To uplift; elate: Your telephone call really lifted my spirits.
5. To remove (plants) from the ground for transplanting.
6. To project or sound in loud, clear tones: lifted their voices in song.
7. Informal To steal; pilfer: A thief lifted my wallet.
8. Informal To copy from something already published; plagiarize: lifted whole paragraphs from the encyclopedia.
9. To pay off or clear (a debt or mortgage, for example).
10. To perform cosmetic surgery on (the face, for example), especially in order to remove wrinkles or sagging skin.
11.
a. Sports To hit (a golf ball) very high into the air.
b. To pick up (a golf ball) to place it in a better lie.
c. To shoot or flip (a puck) so that it rises sharply off the ice.
v.intr.
1.
a. To rise; ascend.
b. To yield to upward pressure: These windows lift easily.
2.
a. To disappear or disperse by or as if by rising: By afternoon the smog had lifted.
b. To stop temporarily: The rain lifted by morning.
3. To become elevated; soar: Their spirits lifted when help came.
n.
1. The act or process of rising or raising to a higher position.
2. Power or force available for raising: the lift of a pump.
3. An organized effort or a flight transporting supplies or people by airplane; an airlift.
4.
a. The extent or height to which something is raised or rises; the amount of elevation.
b. The distance or space through which something is raised or rises.
5. A rise or an elevation in the level of the ground.
6. An elevation of the spirits: The good news gave us a lift.
7. A raised, high, or erect position, as of a part of the body: the lift of his chin.
8. A machine or device designed to pick up, raise, or carry something.
9. One of the layers of leather, rubber, or other material making up the heel of a shoe.
10. Chiefly British A passenger or cargo elevator.
11. A ride in a vehicle given to help someone reach a destination: gave my friend a lift into town.
12. Assistance or help: gave her a lift with her heavy packages.
13. A set of pumps used in a mine.
14. The component of the total aerodynamic force acting on an airfoil or on an entire aircraft or winged missile perpendicular to the relative wind and normally exerted in an upward direction, opposing the pull of gravity.
Phrasal Verb:
lift off
To begin flight: The spacecraft lifted off at noon.
Idiom:
lift fire
To increase the range of artillery fire by elevating the muzzle of a piece.

[Middle English liften, from Old Norse lypta.]

lift′a·ble adj.
lift′er n.
Synonyms: lift, raise, elevate, hoist, heave, boost
These verbs mean to move something from a lower to a higher level or position. Lift sometimes stresses the expenditure of effort: a trunk too heavy to lift. Raise often implies movement to an approximately vertical position: raised my hand so I could ask a question. Elevate emphasizes the sustained or permanent status of the change in position: elevated his sprained ankle; elevated the highway over major thoroughfares. Hoist is applied principally to the lifting of heavy objects, often by mechanical means: hoist a sunken ship. To heave is to lift or raise with great effort or force: heaved the pack onto his back. Boost suggests upward movement effected by pushing from below: boosted the child into the saddle. See Also Synonyms at steal.
Translations

lifting

n. acto de levantar, levantamiento.
References in classic literature ?
It was a rather pretty little picture, for the sisters sat together in the shady nook, with sun and shadow flickering over them, the aromatic wind lifting their hair and cooling their hot cheeks, and all the little wood people going on with their affairs as if these were no strangers but old friends.
He accepted the sunshade, and lifting it over his head descended the steps and walked away.
The scout regarded Heyward in surprise, and then lifting his cap, he answered, in a tone less confident than before-- though still expressing doubt.
No," he said with a sudden dropping of his boyish manner and a slight lifting of his head.
May Heaven forgive you, Hepzibah," said Judge Pyncheon, --reverently lifting his eyes towards that high court of equity to which he appealed,--"if you suffer any ancient prejudice or animosity to weigh with you in this matter.
Lifting her reluctant eyes, there would be nothing human within the scope of view, save the form of this earthly saint
He drooped and fell away from himself for a moment; then lifting his face to them again, showed a deep joy in his eyes, as he cried out with a heavenly enthusiasm, -- but oh
What befel the weakling youth lifting the dread goddess's veil at Sais?
The company takes up the choruses, and men and women cry out like all possessed; some leap to their feet and stamp upon the floor, lifting their glasses and pledging each other.
said Eliza, lifting his long curls and kissing him.
Suddenly, even while the priest was lifting his hands, and all conscious heads were bowed in reverent expec- tation of the coming blessing, there appeared under the arch of the far-off door at the bottom of the hall an old and bent and white-haired lady, leaning upon a crutch-stick; and she lifted the stick and pointed it toward the queen and cried out:
And she has taught me how to say good-morning and good-night to her, which is by lifting my right hoof for her to shake; and also how to say good-bye; I do that with my left foot - but only for practice, because there hasn't been any but make-believe good- byeing yet, and I hope there won't ever be.