ligature


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
ligature
opening notes of "The Star-Spangled Banner"

lig·a·ture

 (lĭg′ə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. The act of tying or binding.
2.
a. A cord, wire, or bandage used for tying or binding.
b. A thread, wire, or cord used in surgery to close vessels or tie off ducts.
c. Something that unites; a bond.
3. A character, letter, or unit of type, such as æ, combining two or more letters.
4. Music
a. A group of notes intended to be played or sung as one phrase.
b. A curved line indicating such a phrase; a slur.
c. A passage of notes sung by repeating the same syllable.
d. A metal band that attaches the reed to the mouthpiece of the clarinet and related instruments.
tr.v. lig·a·tured, lig·a·tur·ing, lig·a·tures
To ligate.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin ligātūra, from Latin ligātus, past participle of ligāre, to bind; see leig- in Indo-European roots.]

ligature

(ˈlɪɡətʃə; -ˌtʃʊə)
n
1. the act of binding or tying up
2. something used to bind
3. a link, bond, or tie
4. (Surgery) surgery a thread or wire for tying around a vessel, duct, etc, as for constricting the flow of blood to a part
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a character of two or more joined letters, such as fl, ffi, ffl
6. (Classical Music) music
a. a slur or the group of notes connected by it
b. (in plainsong notation) a symbol indicating two or more notes grouped together
vb
(tr) to bind with a ligature; ligate
[C14: from Late Latin ligātūra, ultimately from Latin ligāre to bind]

lig•a•ture

(ˈlɪg ə tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. the act of binding or tying up.
2. anything that serves for binding or tying up, as a band, bandage, or cord.
3. a tie or bond.
4. a stroke or bar connecting two letters.
5. a character or type combining two or more letters, as and ffl.
6. a group of musical notes connected by a slur.
7. a thread or wire for surgical constriction of blood vessels or for removing tumors by strangulation.
v.t.
8. to bind with a ligature; tie up; ligate.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin ligātūra. See ligate, -ure]

ligature


Past participle: ligatured
Gerund: ligaturing

Imperative
ligature
ligature
Present
I ligature
you ligature
he/she/it ligatures
we ligature
you ligature
they ligature
Preterite
I ligatured
you ligatured
he/she/it ligatured
we ligatured
you ligatured
they ligatured
Present Continuous
I am ligaturing
you are ligaturing
he/she/it is ligaturing
we are ligaturing
you are ligaturing
they are ligaturing
Present Perfect
I have ligatured
you have ligatured
he/she/it has ligatured
we have ligatured
you have ligatured
they have ligatured
Past Continuous
I was ligaturing
you were ligaturing
he/she/it was ligaturing
we were ligaturing
you were ligaturing
they were ligaturing
Past Perfect
I had ligatured
you had ligatured
he/she/it had ligatured
we had ligatured
you had ligatured
they had ligatured
Future
I will ligature
you will ligature
he/she/it will ligature
we will ligature
you will ligature
they will ligature
Future Perfect
I will have ligatured
you will have ligatured
he/she/it will have ligatured
we will have ligatured
you will have ligatured
they will have ligatured
Future Continuous
I will be ligaturing
you will be ligaturing
he/she/it will be ligaturing
we will be ligaturing
you will be ligaturing
they will be ligaturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ligaturing
you have been ligaturing
he/she/it has been ligaturing
we have been ligaturing
you have been ligaturing
they have been ligaturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ligaturing
you will have been ligaturing
he/she/it will have been ligaturing
we will have been ligaturing
you will have been ligaturing
they will have been ligaturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ligaturing
you had been ligaturing
he/she/it had been ligaturing
we had been ligaturing
you had been ligaturing
they had been ligaturing
Conditional
I would ligature
you would ligature
he/she/it would ligature
we would ligature
you would ligature
they would ligature
Past Conditional
I would have ligatured
you would have ligatured
he/she/it would have ligatured
we would have ligatured
you would have ligatured
they would have ligatured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ligature - (music) a group of notes connected by a slur
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
musical phrase, phrase - a short musical passage
2.ligature - character consisting of two or more letters combined into one
grapheme, graphic symbol, character - a written symbol that is used to represent speech; "the Greek alphabet has 24 characters"
3.ligature - a metal band used to attach a reed to the mouthpiece of a clarinet or saxophone
band - a restraint put around something to hold it together
4.ligature - thread used by surgeons to bind a vessel (as to constrict the flow of blood)
thread, yarn - a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving
5.ligature - something used to tie or bindligature - something used to tie or bind  
ligament - any connection or unifying bond
6.ligature - the act of tying or binding things togetherligature - the act of tying or binding things together
fastening, attachment - the act of fastening things together
ligation - (surgery) tying a duct or blood vessel with a ligature (as to prevent bleeding during surgery)

ligature

noun
That which unites or binds:
Translations
ligaturaslitek
kettős betűlekötésligatura
ligatuur

ligature

[ˈlɪgətʃəʳ] N (Med, Mus) → ligadura f (Typ) → ligado m

ligature

n (Med, Mus, Typ) → Ligatur f; (= bandage)Binde f; (Med: = thread/cord) → Abbindungsschnur f/-draht m

lig·a·ture

n. ligadura; acción o proceso de ligar.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Abbot turned to divest a stout leg of the necessary ligature.
Of this we have abundant proof in the ordinary experience of surgeons, who, by binding the arm with a tie of moderate straitness above the part where they open the vein, cause the blood to flow more copiously than it would have done without any ligature; whereas quite the contrary would happen were they to bind it below; that is, between the hand and the opening, or were to make the ligature above the opening very tight.
These were then easily taken out, and drawn away by the lower end, which was hermetically sealed by means of a strong ligature.
Mortimer would often turn to her, as if she were an interpreter between this sentient world and the insensible man; and she would change the dressing of a wound, or ease a ligature, or turn his face, or alter the pressure of the bedclothes on him, with an absolute certainty of doing right.
Some of the hacked swords were tied to the wrists of those who carried them, with strips of linen and fragments of dress: ligatures various in kind, but all deep of the one colour.
I likewise felt several slender ligatures across my body, from my arm-pits to my thighs.
There was a sort of sham soldier, a "naquois," as the slang expression runs, who was whistling as he undid the bandages from his fictitious wound, and removing the numbness from his sound and vigorous knee, which had been swathed since morning in a thousand ligatures.
As the Orientals say, "A cur's tail may be warmed, and pressed, and bound round with ligatures, and after a twelve years' labor bestowed upon it, still it will retain its natural form.
Their union had existed but two short seasons, and its fruits now lay sleeping at her feet, wrapped in the customary ligatures of skin and bark, which form the swaddlings of an Indian infant.
According to a new market research report" Latin America Orthodontic Supplies Market by Removable & Fixed Braces (Brackets (Self Ligating, Lingual), Archwire (Nickel Titanium, Stainless Steel), Anchorage Appliances (Buccal Tube, Band), Ligature (Elastomeric, Wire)) & Adhesives - Forecast to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, The market is estimated at USD 245.
Contract award: 05ph15 - ligature supplies, sutures and skin adhesives.
Builder Kelvin Hewitt, 41, was found covered in blue paint with a ligature round his neck in his caravan, an inquest heard.