light trap

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light trap

n
(General Engineering) any mechanical arrangement that allows some form of movement to take place while excluding light, such as a light-proof door or the lips of a film cassette
References in classic literature ?
I harnessed four horses to a light trap, took Charmian along, and drove for three months and a half over the wildest mountain parts of California and Oregon.
Farmers can also instal light traps from Apr to June to kill the pests before they move to the cotton field.
The contractor shall supply and maintain a minimum of four (4) light traps to Union Township and two (2) light traps to the City of Mount Pleasant throughout the traditional mosquito season for the purpose of mosquito population and activity monitoring.
Presence of around 8-10 worms on light traps indicate their economic threshold level (ETL) necessitating effective steps to control them.
The programme attributes some of its success to a combination of pheromone and light traps placed at farms around the Emirate.
Finally, based on a better understanding of the nocturnal moth's sexual behavior, we suggest approaches for the joint use of the sex pheromone and light traps in the integrated management of nocturnal moth species.
In a bid to control undesired effects caused by the rains, over 570 members of the health hygiene department will be ready to combat mosquito breeding sites and flies by installing light traps and spraying their breeding areas.
She also uses the more conventional moth light traps, which work on the basis that most moth species in the UK are attracted to a light source.
Help set out the light traps and enjoy a nice hot cup of tea while waiting for the guests to arrive.
Conventional insect light traps disperse UVA from only the front (and some from the sides) of the unit creating a limited attraction window.
To name a few, these would include professional tamper proof rat bait stations, sticky insect monitoring pads and UV light traps.
Entomologists have spent years developing and perfecting light traps for epidemiological and agricultural surveys [see, for example: Hienton 1974; Szentkiralyi 2002], but only in the last decade have studies begun to focus on the attraction potential of regular streetlights and its consequences [see, for example: Scheibe 1999; Kolligs 2000; Eisenbeis and Hanel 2009].