lighthouse


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light·house

 (līt′hous′)
n.
A tall structure topped by a powerful light used as a beacon or signal to aid nautical navigation.

lighthouse

(ˈlaɪtˌhaʊs)
n
a fixed structure in the form of a tower equipped with a light visible to mariners for warning them of obstructions, for marking harbour entrances, etc

light•house

(ˈlaɪtˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
a tower or other structure displaying a light or lights for the guidance of mariners.
[1655–65]

lighthouse

Tall structure containing a light to warn approaching ships of coastal dangers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lighthouse - a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing shipslighthouse - a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
Translations
منارةمَنَارَةٌمَنارَه
maják
fyrfyrtårn
LeuchtturmFeuerturm
lumturo
majakka
svjetionik
világítótorony
viti
灯台
등대
pharus
far
maják
svetilnik
fyr
ประภาคาร
маяк
ngọn hải đăng

lighthouse

[ˈlaɪthaʊs]
A. N (lighthouses (pl)) [ˈlaɪthaʊzɪz]faro m
B. CPD lighthouse keeper Nfarero/a m/f, torrero/a m/f

lighthouse

[ˈlaɪthaʊs] nphare mlighthouse keeper ngardien(ne) m/f de pharelight industry nindustrie f légère

lighthouse

[ˈlaɪtˌhaʊs] nfaro

light1

(lait) noun
1. the brightness given by the sun, a flame, lamps etc that makes things able to be seen. It was nearly dawn and the light was getting stronger; Sunlight streamed into the room.
2. something which gives light (eg a lamp). Suddenly all the lights went out.
3. something which can be used to set fire to something else; a flame. Have you got a light for my cigarette?
4. a way of viewing or regarding. He regarded her action in a favourable light.
adjective
1. having light; not dark. The studio was a large, light room.
2. (of a colour) pale; closer to white than black. light green.
verbpast tense, past participle lit (lit) , ˈlighted
1. to give light to. The room was lit only by candles.
2. to (make something) catch fire. She lit the gas; I think this match is damp, because it won't light.
ˈlightness noun
ˈlighten verb
to make or become brighter. The white ceiling lightened the room; The sky was lightening.
ˈlighter noun
something used for lighting (a cigarette etc).
ˈlighting noun
a means of providing light. The lighting was so bad in the restaurant that we could hardly see.
lighthouse noun
a building built on rocks, coastline etc with a (flashing) light to guide or warn ships.
ˈlight-year noun
the distance light travels in a year (nearly 9.5 million million kilometres).
bring to light
to reveal or cause to be noticed. The scandal was brought to light by the investigations of a journalist.
come to light
to be revealed or discovered. The manuscript came to light in a box of books at an auction.
in the light of
taking into consideration (eg new information). The theory has been abandoned in the light of more recent discoveries.
light up
1. to begin to give out light. Evening came and the streetlights lit up.
2. to make, be or become full of light. The powerful searchlight lit up the building; She watched the house light up as everyone awoke.
3. to make or become happy. Her face lit up when she saw him; A sudden smile lit up her face.
see the light
1. to be born, discovered, produced etc. After many problems his invention finally saw the light (of day).
2. to be converted to someone else's point of view etc.
set light to
to cause to begin burning. He set light to the pile of rubbish in his garden.

lighthouse

مَنَارَةٌ maják fyr Leuchtturm φάρος faro majakka phare svjetionik faro 灯台 등대 vuurtoren fyrtårn latarnia farol маяк fyr ประภาคาร deniz feneri ngọn hải đăng 灯塔
References in classic literature ?
See what a real corner of the world it occupies; how it stands there, away off shore, more lonely than the Eddystone lighthouse.
Built upon a dismal reef of sunken rocks, some league or so from shore, on which the waters chafed and dashed, the wild year through, there stood a solitary lighthouse.
Spenlow's proctorial gown and stiff cravat took Peggotty down a little, and inspired her with a greater reverence for the man who was gradually becoming more and more etherealized in my eyes every day, and about whom a reflected radiance seemed to me to beam when he sat erect in Court among his papers, like a little lighthouse in a sea of stationery.
When the rain came with it and dashed against the windows, I thought, raising my eyes to them as they rocked, that I might have fancied myself in a storm-beaten lighthouse.
The harbour lies below me, with, on the far side, one long granite wall stretching out into the sea, with a curve outwards at the end of it, in the middle of which is a lighthouse.
I examined the fittings of the apparatus, the strength of which was increased a hundredfold by lenticular rings, placed similar to those in a lighthouse, and which projected their brilliance in a horizontal plane.
An hour after, the Henrietta passed the lighthouse which marks the entrance of the Hudson, turned the point of Sandy Hook, and put to sea.
This intense heat they project in a parallel beam against any object they choose, by means of a polished parabolic mirror of unknown composition, much as the parabolic mirror of a lighthouse projects a beam of light.
They had left the Ile Ratonneau, where the lighthouse stood, on the right, and were now opposite the Point des Catalans.
In all the devious tracings the course of a sailing-ship leaves upon the white paper of a chart she is always aiming for that one little spot - maybe a small island in the ocean, a single headland upon the long coast of a continent, a lighthouse on a bluff, or simply the peaked form of a mountain like an ant-heap afloat upon the waters.
He and Harvey went out on the trolley to East Gloucester, where they tramped through the bayberry-bushes to the lighthouse, and lay down on the big red boulders and laughed themselves hungry.
Once more Mowgli stared, as he had stared at the rebellious cubs, full into the beryl-green eyes till the red glare behind their green went out like the light of a lighthouse shut off twenty miles across the sea; till the eyes dropped, and the big head with them--dropped lower and lower, and the red rasp of a tongue grated on Mowgli's instep.