lightness


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light·ness 1

 (līt′nĭs)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being illuminated.
2. The dimension of the color of an object by which the object appears to reflect or transmit more or less of the incident light, varying from black to white for surface colors and from black to colorless for transparent volume colors.

light·ness 2

 (līt′nĭs)
n.
1. The state or quality of having little weight or force.
2. Ease or quickness of movement; agility.
3. Ease or cheerfulness in manner or style.
4. Freedom from worry or trouble.
5. Lack of appropriate seriousness; levity.
6. Delicacy or subtlety in craft, performance, or effect.

lightness

(ˈlaɪtnɪs)
n
the attribute of an object or colour that enables an observer to judge the extent to which the object or colour reflects or transmits incident light. See also colour

light•ness2

(ˈlaɪt nɪs)

n.
1. the state or quality of being light or illuminated.
2. a thin or pale coloration.
[before 1050]

light•ness1

(ˈlaɪt nɪs)

n.
1. the state or quality of being light in weight.
2. the quality of being agile, nimble, or graceful.
3. lack of pressure or burdensomeness.
4. lack of seriousness; levity in actions, thoughts, or speech.
5. gaiety of manner, speech, style, etc.
[1175–1225]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lightness - a feeling of joy and pride
joy, joyfulness, joyousness - the emotion of great happiness
euphoria, euphory - a feeling of great (usually exaggerated) elation
2.lightness - the property of being comparatively small in weight; "the lightness of balsa wood"
weight - the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity
airiness, buoyancy - the property of something weightless and insubstantial
heaviness, weightiness - the property of being comparatively great in weight; "the heaviness of lead"
3.lightness - the gracefulness of a person or animal that is quick and nimblelightness - the gracefulness of a person or animal that is quick and nimble
gracefulness - beautiful carriage
4.lightness - having a light color
value - relative darkness or lightness of a color; "I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, medium...and light"-Joe Hing Lowe
darkness - having a dark or somber color
5.lightness - the visual effect of illumination on objects or scenes as created in pictures; "he could paint the lightest light and the darkest dark"
visual property - an attribute of vision
gloriole, halo, nimbus, aura, aureole, glory - an indication of radiant light drawn around the head of a saint
sunniness - lightness created by sunlight
highlighting, highlight - an area of lightness in a picture
brightness - the location of a visual perception along a continuum from black to white
6.lightness - the trait of being lighthearted and frivolous
giddiness, silliness - an impulsive scatterbrained manner
Translations
إضاءَه، إشْراقخِفَّه ، حَيَوَيَّه
jasnostlehkost
lethedlys
birta, skærleikiléttleiki
aydınlıkhafiflik

lightness

1 [ˈlaɪtnɪs] N
1. (= brightness) [of room] → luminosidad f
2. (= paleness) [of colour] → claridad f

lightness

2 [ˈlaɪtnɪs] N
1. (in weight) → ligereza f, liviandad f (LAm) (Culin) [of pastry, mixture] → ligereza f, suavidad f
a feeling of lightness came over herle invadió una sensación de ligereza
her lightness of stepla ligereza or agilidad de sus pasos
2. (= undemanding nature) [of duties] → ligereza f
3. [of tone, voice] → suavidad f
4. [of sentence] → levedad f

lightness

[ˈlaɪtnəs] n
(in weight)légèreté f
[movement] → légèreté f
[treatment] → légèreté f
lightness of touch [writer, performer] → légèreté du trait

lightness

1
nHelligkeit f

lightness

2
n
geringes Gewicht, Leichtheit f; (of task, step, movements)Leichtigkeit f; (of taxes)Niedrigkeit f; (of punishment)Milde f; (of soil, cake)Lockerheit f; lightness of touch (of pianist)weicher or leichter Anschlag; the lightness of the breeze/musicdie leichte Brise/Musik; a feeling of lightness came over himein Gefühl der Erleichterung überkam ihn
(= lack of seriousness)mangelnder Ernst; a certain lightness in your attitude toward(s) the authoritieseine gewisse Leichtfertigkeit den Behörden gegenüber

lightness

[ˈlaɪtnɪs] n
a. (brightness) → chiarezza
b. (in weight) → leggerezza

light1

(lait) noun
1. the brightness given by the sun, a flame, lamps etc that makes things able to be seen. It was nearly dawn and the light was getting stronger; Sunlight streamed into the room.
2. something which gives light (eg a lamp). Suddenly all the lights went out.
3. something which can be used to set fire to something else; a flame. Have you got a light for my cigarette?
4. a way of viewing or regarding. He regarded her action in a favourable light.
adjective
1. having light; not dark. The studio was a large, light room.
2. (of a colour) pale; closer to white than black. light green.
verbpast tense, past participle lit (lit) , ˈlighted
1. to give light to. The room was lit only by candles.
2. to (make something) catch fire. She lit the gas; I think this match is damp, because it won't light.
ˈlightness noun
ˈlighten verb
to make or become brighter. The white ceiling lightened the room; The sky was lightening.
ˈlighter noun
something used for lighting (a cigarette etc).
ˈlighting noun
a means of providing light. The lighting was so bad in the restaurant that we could hardly see.
lighthouse noun
a building built on rocks, coastline etc with a (flashing) light to guide or warn ships.
ˈlight-year noun
the distance light travels in a year (nearly 9.5 million million kilometres).
bring to light
to reveal or cause to be noticed. The scandal was brought to light by the investigations of a journalist.
come to light
to be revealed or discovered. The manuscript came to light in a box of books at an auction.
in the light of
taking into consideration (eg new information). The theory has been abandoned in the light of more recent discoveries.
light up
1. to begin to give out light. Evening came and the streetlights lit up.
2. to make, be or become full of light. The powerful searchlight lit up the building; She watched the house light up as everyone awoke.
3. to make or become happy. Her face lit up when she saw him; A sudden smile lit up her face.
see the light
1. to be born, discovered, produced etc. After many problems his invention finally saw the light (of day).
2. to be converted to someone else's point of view etc.
set light to
to cause to begin burning. He set light to the pile of rubbish in his garden.

light2

(lait) adjective
1. easy to lift or carry; of little weight. I bought a light suitcase for plane journeys.
2. easy to bear, suffer or do. Next time the punishment will not be so light.
3. (of food) easy to digest. a light meal.
4. of less weight than it should be. The load of grain was several kilos light.
5. of little weight. Aluminium is a light metal.
6. lively or agile. She was very light on her feet.
7. cheerful; not serious. light music.
8. little in quantity; not intense, heavy, strong etc. light rain.
9. (of soil) containing a lot of sand.
ˈlightly adverb
ˈlightness noun
ˈlighten verb
to make or become less heavy. She lightened her suitcase by taking out several pairs of shoes; The postman's bag of parcels lightened as he went from house to house.
ˌlight-ˈfingered adjective
inclined to steal things.
ˌlight-ˈheaded adjective
dizzy and giddy.
ˌlight-ˈhearted adjective
happy and free from anxiety; not grave or serious. a light-hearted mood.
ˈlightweight adjective
light in weight. a lightweight raincoat.
get off lightly
to escape or be allowed to go without severe punishment etc.
make light of
to treat (problems etc) as unimportant.
travel light
to travel with little luggage.
References in classic literature ?
He was conscious of an aloofness from everything earthly and a strange and joyous lightness of existence.
As Mainhall had said, she was the second act; the plot and feeling alike depended upon her lightness of foot, her lightness of touch, upon the shrewdness and deft fancifulness that played alternately, and sometimes together, in her mirthful brown eyes.
It is monstrous that for no offence but the wish to produce something beautiful, and the mistake of his powers in that direction, a writer should become the prey of some ferocious wit, and that his tormentor should achieve credit by his lightness and ease in rending his prey; it is shocking to think how alluring and depraving the fact is to the young reader emulous of such credit, and eager to achieve it.
The lost life-buoy was now to be replaced; Starbuck was directed to see to it; but as no cask of sufficient lightness could be found, and as in the feverish eagerness of what seemed the approaching crisis of the voyage, all hands were impatient of any toil but what was directly connected with its final end, whatever that might prove to be; therefore, they were going to leave the ship's stern unprovided with a buoy, when by certain strange signs and inuendoes Queequeg hinted a hint concerning his coffin.
Lightness and concentrated power are the great qualities of fore-and-aft rig.
We would have to discover a motive power of extraordinary force, and almost impossible lightness of machinery.
Fortunately, he speedily found it again, and he knotted it together without difficulty, thanks to the gypsy, thanks to Djali, who still walked in front of him; two fine, delicate, and charming creatures, whose tiny feet, beautiful forms, and graceful manners he was engaged in admiring, almost confusing them in his contemplation; believing them to be both young girls, from their intelligence and good friendship; regarding them both as goats,--so far as the lightness, agility, and dexterity of their walk were concerned.
But there is a lightness about the feminine mind--a touch and go--music, the fine arts, that kind of thing--they should study those up to a certain point, women should; but in a light way, you know.
Be that as it may, it always seemed to me that I moved with greater speed and agility within Pellucidar than upon the outer surface--there was a certain airy lightness of step that was most pleasing, and a feeling of bodily detachment which I can only compare with that occasionally experienced in dreams.
Mr Chester was more than usually gay; but not caring, as it seemed, to open a conversation with one whose humour was so different, he vented the lightness of his spirit in smiles and sparkling looks, and made no effort to awaken his attention.
He thought of the home he might at that moment have been seeking with pleasure and pride; of the different man he might have been that night; of the lightness then in his now heavy- laden breast; of the then restored honour, self-respect, and tranquillity all torn to pieces.
I was left alone with this new feeling of lightness and content.