lights


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lights

 (līts)
pl.n.
The lungs, especially the lungs of an animal slaughtered for food.

[Middle English lightes, from light, light in weight (from the lightness of the lungs compared to other organs); see light2.]

lights

(laɪts)
pl n
a person's ideas, knowledge, or understanding: he did it according to his lights.

lights

(laɪts)
pl n
(Veterinary Science) the lungs, esp of sheep, bullocks, and pigs, used for feeding pets and occasionally in human food
[C13: plural noun use of light2, referring to the light weight of the lungs]

lights

(laɪts)

n.pl.
the lungs, esp. of sheep, pigs, etc.
[1150–1200; Middle English lihte, lightes, n. use of liht light2; compare lung]

lights

  • day - One of the perpendicular divisions or "lights" of a mullioned window.
  • blackout - Originally a theatrical term for the extinguishing of all lights on the stage when scenery was shifted.
  • taps, last post - Taps, the bugle call for lights out, was originally a drum roll and got its name from the tapping of the drums; taps are also called last post.
  • twilight - The time of two lights, the fading sunset and the emerging light of the moon and stars; there are three sequential stages of twilight: civil twilight, nautical twilight, and astronomical twilight.

Lights

The lungs of slaughtered calves and pigs. They were sometimes eaten shortly after butchering and were considered by some to be a delicacy and by others to be just another organ meat that should not be wasted.
Translations

lights

pl (Anat) → Tierlunge f

lights

[laɪts] npl (old) (of animal) → polmone m
References in classic literature ?
If he is, and spouts a whole lot of that bone-dry stuff about the ancient Mayan civilization and their antiquities, with side lights on how the old-time Indians used to scalp their enemies, I'm going to the moving pictures
The moon was coming up, and its mystic shimmer was casting a million lights across the distant, restless water.
This wall-paper has a kind of sub-pattern in a different shade, a particularly irritating one, for you can only see it in certain lights, and not clearly then.
It was like nothing so much as the phantasmagoric play of the northern lights.
Thinking that viewed in some particular lights, the case might by a bare possibility in some small degree be deemed, under the circumstances, a rather hard one, an honest clergyman of the town respectfully addressed a note to his Grace, begging him to take the case of those unfortunate mariners into full consideration.
In the dust and the steam the electric lights would shine like far-off twinkling stars--red and blue-green and purple stars, according to the color of the mist and the brew from which it came.
With the young reporter at his side, he ventured in the light of day into Main Street or strode up and down on the rick- ety front porch of his own house, talking excitedly.
As he walked about the platform in his high-heeled boots, looking for our trunks, I saw that he was a rather slight man, quick and wiry, and light on his feet.
Smothered voices were next heard, as though men called to each other in the bowels of the earth, when a sudden light flashed upon those without, and laid bare the much-prized secret of the place.
The girl then turned towards the House of the Seven Gables, to the door of which, meanwhile,--not the shop-door, but the antique portal,--the omnibus-man had carried a light trunk and a bandbox.
Then, with all the marks of a deliberation that must have seemed magnificent had there been anyone to admire it, I laid down my book, rose to my feet, and, taking a candle, went straight out of the room and, from the passage, on which my light made little impression, noiselessly closed and locked the door.
But presently I came to a smoky light proceeding from a low, wide building, the door of which stood invitingly open.