lights


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lights

 (līts)
pl.n.
The lungs, especially the lungs of an animal slaughtered for food.

[Middle English lightes, from light, light in weight (from the lightness of the lungs compared to other organs); see light2.]

lights

(laɪts)
pl n
a person's ideas, knowledge, or understanding: he did it according to his lights.

lights

(laɪts)
pl n
(Veterinary Science) the lungs, esp of sheep, bullocks, and pigs, used for feeding pets and occasionally in human food
[C13: plural noun use of light2, referring to the light weight of the lungs]

lights

(laɪts)

n.pl.
the lungs, esp. of sheep, pigs, etc.
[1150–1200; Middle English lihte, lightes, n. use of liht light2; compare lung]

lights

  • day - One of the perpendicular divisions or "lights" of a mullioned window.
  • blackout - Originally a theatrical term for the extinguishing of all lights on the stage when scenery was shifted.
  • taps, last post - Taps, the bugle call for lights out, was originally a drum roll and got its name from the tapping of the drums; taps are also called last post.
  • twilight - The time of two lights, the fading sunset and the emerging light of the moon and stars; there are three sequential stages of twilight: civil twilight, nautical twilight, and astronomical twilight.

Lights

The lungs of slaughtered calves and pigs. They were sometimes eaten shortly after butchering and were considered by some to be a delicacy and by others to be just another organ meat that should not be wasted.
Translations

lights

pl (Anat) → Tierlunge f

lights

[laɪts] npl (old) (of animal) → polmone m
References in classic literature ?
No changes in English Inland lights for week ending Dec.
But, even at this height, it is wise to show no lights, lest she might learn something of our presence or absence.
That is right; but we shall want lights to guide us in the vaults.
Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that showeth best by day; but it will not rise to the price of a diamond, or carbuncle, that showeth best in varied lights.
After curving through streets of comparative darkness, so narrow that shadows on the blinds were pressed within a few feet of their faces, they came to one of those great knots of activity where the lights, having drawn close together, thin out again and take their separate ways.
It's a year and more that Hannah Cox has been about the village with some story about two lights on a stormy night.
The family, after having been thus occupied for a short time, extinguished their lights and retired, as I conjectured, to rest.
The position of the lights rendered objects in the batteau distinguishable, both from the canoe and the shore; and the heavy fall on the water drew all eyes to the steward, as he lay struggling, for a moment, in sight.
But I live in mine own light, I drink again into myself the flames that break forth from me.
And the monasteries, which at the beginning had been like lamps of light set in a dark country, had themselves become centers of darkness and idleness.
When darkness came on, he saw a light, which he went up to, and came to a house wherein lived a witch.
It was dim-lighted; but his eyes had never had to adjust themselves to any other light.