limestone


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lime·stone

 (līm′stōn′)
n.
A common sedimentary rock consisting mostly of calcium carbonate, CaCO3, used as a building stone and in the manufacture of lime, carbon dioxide, and cement.

limestone

(ˈlaɪmˌstəʊn)
n
(Minerals) a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium carbonate, deposited as the calcareous remains of marine animals or chemically precipitated from the sea: used as a building stone and in the manufacture of cement, lime, etc

lime•stone

(ˈlaɪmˌstoʊn)

n.
a sedimentary rock consisting predominantly of calcium carbonate, varieties of which are formed from the skeletons of marine microorganisms and coral: used as a building stone and in the manufacture of lime.
[1515–25]

lime·stone

(līm′stōn′)
A sedimentary rock consisting primarily of calcium carbonate, often in the form of the mineral calcite. Limestones can occur in many colors but are usually white, gray, or black. They often contain fossil shells and other marine organisms. See Table at rock.

limestone

Sedimentary rock composed mainly of calcium carbonate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.limestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animalslimestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animals
atomic number 20, Ca, calcium - a white metallic element that burns with a brilliant light; the fifth most abundant element in the earth's crust; an important component of most plants and animals
atomic number 6, carbon, C - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
rock, stone - material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust; "that mountain is solid rock"; "stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries"
sedimentary rock - rock formed from consolidated clay sediments
calcite - a common mineral consisting of crystallized calcium carbonate; a major constituent of limestone
rottenstone, tripoli - a weathered and decomposed siliceous limestone; in powdered form it is used in polishing
Translations
حَجَرُ الْـجِيْرِحَجَر كِلْسي
vápenec
kalksten
kalkkikivi
vapnenac
mészkő
kalksteinn
石灰岩
석회석
calcar
vápenec
apnenec
kalksten
หินปูน
đá vôi

limestone

[ˈlaɪmstəʊn] N(piedra f) caliza f

limestone

[ˈlaɪmstəʊn]
n (= rock) → calcaire m
modif [cliff, hill] → calcaire; [cave] → calcaire
high limestone cliffs → de hautes falaises calcaires limestone pavementlimestone pavement nplateau m calcaire

limestone

nKalkstein m

limestone

[ˈlaɪmˌstəʊn] n (Geol) → calcare m, pietra calcarea

lime1

(laim) noun
the white substance left after heating limestone, used in making cement.
ˈlimestone noun
a kind of rock.
ˈlimelight: in the limelight
attracting the public's attention.

limestone

حَجَرُ الْـجِيْرِ vápenec kalksten Kalkstein ασβεστόλιθος caliza kalkkikivi calcaire vapnenac calcare 石灰岩 석회석 kalksteen kalkstein wapień calcário известняк kalksten หินปูน kireç taşı đá vôi 石灰石
References in classic literature ?
The Richmond house was built of limestone, and, although it was said in the village to have become run down, had in reality grown more beautiful with every passing year.
Such old foxes as Chingachgook and myself are not often caught in a barrow with one hole," said Hawkeye, laughing; "you can easily see the cunning of the place--the rock is black limestone, which everybody knows is soft; it makes no uncomfortable pillow, where brush and pine wood is scarce; well, the fall was once a few yards below us, and I dare to say was, in its time, as regular and as handsome a sheet of water as any along the Hudson.
But not alone has this Leviathan left his pre-adamite traces in the stereotype plates of nature, and in limestone and marl bequeathed his ancient bust; but upon Egyptian tablets, whose antiquity seems to claim for them an almost fossiliferous character, we find the unmistakable print of his fin.
Within was a small chamber, chilly as an ice-house, and walled by Nature with solid limestone that was dewy with a cold sweat.
Since leaving Green River the plains had invariably been of loose sand or coarse gravel, and the rocky formation of the mountains of primitive limestone.
It is a very fine old place, of red brick, softened by a pale powdery lichen, which has dispersed itself with happy irregularity, so as to bring the red brick into terms of friendly companionship with the limestone ornaments surrounding the three gables, the windows, and the door-place.
Occasionally the monotony of this vast wilderness is interrupted by mountainous belts of sand and limestone, broken into confused masses; with precipitous cliffs and yawning ravines, looking like the ruins of a world; or is traversed by lofty and barren ridges of rock, almost impassable, like those denominated the Black Hills.
These--whatever they were--were of massive grey stone, probably limestone rudely cut--if indeed they were not shaped naturally.
Herod the Great is said to have made a magnificent city of this place, and a great number of coarse limestone columns, twenty feet high and two feet through, that are almost guiltless of architectural grace of shape and ornament, are pointed out by many authors as evidence of the fact.
As the limestone of the continent consists of infinite masses of the shells of animalcules, so language is made up of images or tropes, which now, in their secondary use, have long ceased to remind us of their poetic origin.
After nearly half an hour's tramp, past endless lines of huts, Infadoos halted at last by the gate of a little group of huts which surrounded a small courtyard of powdered limestone, and informed us that these were to be our "poor" quarters.
Let the reader picture to himself, crowning a limestone hillock, an oblong mass of masonry fifteen feet in height, thirty wide, forty long, with a gate, an external railing and a platform; on this platform sixteen enormous pillars of rough hewn stone, thirty feet in height, arranged in a colonnade round three of the four sides of the mass which support them, bound together at their summits by heavy beams, whence hung chains at intervals; on all these chains, skeletons; in the vicinity, on the plain, a stone cross and two gibbets of secondary importance, which seemed to have sprung up as shoots around the central gallows; above all this, in the sky, a perpetual flock of crows; that was Montfauçon.