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line 1

1. Mathematics A geometric figure formed by a point moving along a fixed direction and the reverse direction.
a. A thin continuous mark, as that made by a pen, pencil, or brush applied to a surface.
b. A similar mark cut or scratched into a surface.
c. A crease in the skin, especially on the face; a wrinkle.
a. A real or imaginary mark positioned in relation to fixed points of reference.
b. A degree or circle of longitude or latitude drawn on a map or globe.
c. The equator. Used with the.
a. A border or boundary: the county line.
b. A demarcation: a line of darker water beyond the reef.
c. A contour or an outline: the line of the hills against the evening sky.
a. A mark used to define a shape or represent a contour.
b. Any of the marks that make up the formal design of a picture.
a. A cable, rope, string, cord, or wire.
b. Nautical A rope used aboard a ship.
c. A fishing line.
d. A clothesline.
e. A cord or tape used, as by builders or surveyors, for measuring, leveling, or straightening.
7. A pipe or system of pipes for conveying a fluid: gas lines.
8. An electric-power transmission cable.
a. A wire or system of wires connecting telephone or telegraph systems.
b. An open or functioning telephone connection: tried to get a free line.
a. A passenger or cargo system of public or private transportation, as by ship, aircraft, or bus, usually over a definite route.
b. A company owning or managing such a system.
a. A railway track or system of tracks.
b. A particular section of a railway network: the Philadelphia-Trenton line.
12. A course of progress or movement; a route: a line of flight.
a. A general method, manner, or course of procedure: different lines of thought; took a hard line on defense.
b. A manner or course of procedure determined by a specified factor: development along socialist lines.
c. An official or prescribed policy: the party line.
14. often lines A general concept or model: a trilogy along the lines of the Oresteia.
a. The condition of being in proper or aligned position: Is the table in line with the sofa?
b. A condition of agreement or correspondence: Your attitude is in line with mine. Is the policy in line with reality?
a. One's trade, occupation, or field of interest: What line of work are you in?
b. Range of competence: not in my line.
17. Merchandise or services of a similar or related nature: carries a complete line of small tools.
18. A group of persons or things arranged in a row or series: long lines at the box office; a line of stones.
a. Ancestry or lineage.
b. A series of persons, especially from one family, who succeed each other: a line of monarchs; comes from a long line of bankers.
c. A strain, as of livestock or plants, developed and maintained by selective breeding.
a. A sequence of related things that leads to a certain ending: a line of argument.
b. An ordered system of operations that allows a sequential manufacture or assembly of goods at all or various stages of production.
c. The personnel of an organization or a business who actually make a product or perform a service.
21. A horizontal row of printed or written words or symbols.
22. One of the horizontal scans forming a television image.
23. A brief letter; a note: I'll drop you a line.
a. A unit of verse ending in a visual or typographic break and generally characterized by its length and meter: a line of iambic pentameter.
b. A unit of uninterrupted text spoken by an actor in a theatrical presentation: spent the weekend learning her lines.
25. Informal Glib or insincere talk, usually intended to deceive or impress: He kept on handing me a line about how busy he is.
26. lines Chiefly British
a. A marriage certificate.
b. A usually specified number of lines of prose or verse to be written out by a pupil as punishment.
27. Games A horizontal demarcation on a scorecard in bridge dividing the honor score from the trick score.
a. A source of information.
b. The information itself: got a line on the computer project.
a. Music One of the five parallel marks constituting a staff.
b. A sustained melodic or harmonic part in a piece: strained to hear the tenor line.
a. A formation in which elements, such as troops, tanks, or ships, are arranged abreast of one another.
b. The battle area closest to the enemy; the front.
c. The combat troops or warships at the front, arrayed for defense or offense.
d. The regular forces of an army or a navy, in contrast to staff and support personnel.
e. The class of officers in direct command of warships or of army combat units.
f. A bulwark or trench.
g. An extended system of such fortifications or defenses: the Siegfried line.
31. Sports
a. A foul line.
b. A real or imaginary mark demarcating a specified section of a playing area or field.
c. A real or imaginary mark or point at which a race begins or ends.
d. The center and two wings making up a hockey team's offensive unit.
e. Football A line of scrimmage.
f. Football The linemen considered as a group.
32. Informal The odds a bookmaker gives, especially for sports events.
33. The proportion of an insurance risk assumed by a particular underwriter or company.
34. Slang An amount of powdered cocaine arranged in a thin, long strip for snorting.
v. lined, lin·ing, lines
1. To mark, incise, or cover with a line or lines.
2. To represent with lines.
3. To place in a series or row.
4. To form a bordering line along: Small stalls lined the alley.
5. Baseball To hit (a ball) sharply so that it flies low and fast.
v.intr. Baseball
To hit a line drive: lined out to shortstop.
Phrasal Verb:
line up
1. To arrange in or form a line.
2. Football To take one's position in a formation before a snap or kickoff.
3. To organize or make ready: lined up considerable support for the bill.
4. To engage or schedule: lined up some freelance work for next month; lined up a speaker for graduation.
all along the line
1. In every place.
2. At every stage or moment.
down the line
1. All the way; throughout: Errors are to be found down the line.
2. At a point or an end in the future.
in line for
Next in order for: in line for the presidency.
on the line
1. Ready or available for immediate payment.
2. So as to be risked; in jeopardy: "Careers were on the line once again" (Seymour M. Hersh).
out of line
1. Uncalled-for; improper.
2. Unruly and out of control.

[Middle English, from Old English līne and from Old French ligne, both from Latin līnea, string, cord, from feminine of līneus, of linen, from līnum, thread, linen; see lī̆no- in Indo-European roots.]

line 2

tr.v. lined, lin·ing, lines
1. To fit a covering to the inside surface of: a coat lined with fur.
2. To cover the inner surface of: Moisture lined the walls of the cave.
3. To fill plentifully, as with money or food.
line (one's) pockets
To make a profit, especially by illegitimate means.

[Middle English linen, from line, flax, linen cloth, from Old English līn, from Latin līnum; see lī̆no- in Indo-European roots.]


pl n
1. general appearance or outline: a car with fine lines.
2. a plan of procedure or construction: built on traditional lines.
3. (Theatre)
a. the spoken words of a theatrical presentation
b. the words of a particular role: he forgot his lines.
4. informal chiefly Brit a marriage certificate: marriage lines.
5. luck, fate, or fortune (esp in the phrase hard lines)
6. (Military)
a. rows of tents, buildings, temporary stabling, etc, in a military camp: transport lines.
b. a defensive position, row of trenches, or other fortification: we broke through the enemy lines.
7. (Education)
a. a school punishment of writing the same sentence or phrase out a specified number of times
b. the phrases or sentences so written out: a hundred lines.
8. read between the lines to understand or find an implicit meaning in addition to the obvious one


Long leather straps about an inch wide running from the horse’s (or mule’s) bridle to the driver. When a line broke, a long piece of rope was sometimes temporarily substituted for the leather line. Another temporary fix was just to tie the line together, but the permanent fix was to rivet the ends of the broken line together.
كَلِمات دَوْر المُمَثِّل
texti í leikriti


(lain) noun
1. (a piece of) thread, cord, rope etc. She hung the washing on the line; a fishing-rod and line.
2. a long, narrow mark, streak or stripe. She drew straight lines across the page; a dotted/wavy line.
3. outline or shape especially relating to length or direction. The ship had very graceful lines; A dancer uses a mirror to improve his line.
4. a groove on the skin; a wrinkle.
5. a row or group of objects or persons arranged side by side or one behind the other. The children stood in a line; a line of trees.
6. a short letter. I'll drop him a line.
7. a series or group of persons which come one after the other especially in the same family. a line of kings.
8. a track or direction. He pointed out the line of the new road; a new line of research.
9. the railway or a single track of the railway. Passengers must cross the line by the bridge only.
10. a continuous system (especially of pipes, electrical or telephone cables etc) connecting one place with another. a pipeline; a line of communication; All (telephone) lines are engaged.
11. a row of written or printed words. The letter contained only three lines; a poem of sixteen lines.
12. a regular service of ships, aircraft etc. a shipping line.
13. a group or class (of goods for sale) or a field of activity, interest etc. This has been a very popular new line; Computers are not really my line.
14. an arrangement of troops, especially when ready to fight. fighting in the front line.
1. to form lines along. Crowds lined the pavement to see the Queen.
2. to mark with lines.
lineage (ˈliniidʒ) noun
linear (ˈliniə) adjective
of, consisting of or like a line or lines.
lined adjective
having lines. lined paper; a lined face.
ˈliner noun
a ship or aircraft of a regular line or company. They sailed to America in a large liner.
lines noun plural
the words an actor has to say. He had difficulty remembering his lines.
ˈlinesman (ˈlainz-) noun
in sport, a judge or umpire at a boundary line.
hard lines!
bad luck!.
in line for
likely to get or to be given something. He is in line for promotion.
in/out of line with
in or out of agreement with. His views are out of line with those of his colleagues.
line up
1. to form a line. The children lined up ready to leave the classroom; She lined up the chairs.
2. to collect and arrange in readiness. We've lined up several interesting guests to appear on the programme (noun ˈline-up).
read between the lines
to understand something (from a piece of writing etc) which is not actually stated.
References in classic literature ?
Sharp commands from the ship's officers hastened the work of the crew in making things snug, and life lines were strung along deck for the safety of such of the passengers as might venture up when the blow began.
Grandfather had explained to Ambrosch that some day, when the country was put under fence and the roads were confined to section lines, two roads would cross exactly on that corner.
The lines of her body were long, clean and symmetrical; it was a body which occasionally fell into splendid poses; there was no suggestion of the trim, stereotyped fashion-plate about it.
But you speak of instruction, and of a profession; are you an adjunct to the provincial corps, as a master of the noble science of defense and offense; or, perhaps, you are one who draws lines and angles, under the pretense of expounding the mathematics?
For two hours no one ventured in the glare of the open, or even to cross the narrow, unshadowed street, whose dull red dust seemed to glow between the lines of straggling houses.
The lines and tufts of green moss, here and there, seemed pledges of familiarity and sisterhood with Nature; as if this human dwelling-place, being of such old date, had established its prescriptive title among primeval oaks and whatever other objects, by virtue of their long continuance, have acquired a gracious right to be.
He had begun an investigation, as he imagined, with the severe and equal integrity of a judge, desirous only of truth, even as if the question involved no more than the air-drawn lines and figures of a geometrical problem, instead of human passions, and wrongs inflicted on himself.
She stared, in short, and retreated on just MY lines, and I knew she had then passed out and come round to me and that I should presently meet her.
But what most puzzled and confounded you was a long, limber, portentous, black mass of something hovering in the centre of the picture over three blue, dim, perpendicular lines floating in a nameless yeast.
Meantime, they hauled more and more upon their lines, till close flanking him on both sides, Stubb answered Flask with lance for lance; and thus round and round the Pequod the battle went, while the multitudes of sharks that had before swum round the Sperm Whale's body, rushed to the fresh blood that was spilled, thirstily drinking at every new gash, as the eager Israelites did at the new bursting fountains that poured from the smitten rock.
These telegrams consist of fourteen and two-thirds lines from Berlin, fifteen lines from Vienna, and two and five-eights lines from Calcutta.
This was to be not only the longest of all telephone lines, strung on ten thousand poles; it was to be a line de luxe, built of glistening red copper, not iron.