linesman

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lines·man

 (līnz′mən)
n.
1. Football An official who marks the downs and the position of the ball and watches for certain violations from the sidelines.
2. Sports
a. An official in various court games whose chief duty is to call shots that fall out of bounds.
b. An official in soccer and other field games who indicates when the ball has gone out of bounds.
c. Either of two officials in ice hockey who call icing and offsides, conduct face-offs, and call penalities.
3. See lineman.

linesman

(ˈlaɪnzmən)
n, pl -men
1. (General Sporting Terms) an official who helps the referee or umpire in various sports, esp by indicating when the ball has gone out of play
2. (Professions) chiefly Brit a person who installs, maintains, or repairs telephone or electric-power lines. US and Canadian name: lineman
3. (Telecommunications) chiefly Brit a person who installs, maintains, or repairs telephone or electric-power lines. US and Canadian name: lineman

lines•man

(ˈlaɪnz mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. an official in tennis and soccer who indicates when the ball goes out of bounds.
2. an official in football who marks the distances gained or lost on each play.
3. an official in ice hockey who calls icing and offside violations and conducts face-offs.

linesman

Two linesmen patrol the side of the perimeter field. Their job is to indicate with a flag when the ball goes outside the perimeter. They also give offside decisions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.linesman - official (in tennis, soccer, football, etc.) who assists the referee in some way (especially by watching for out of bounds or offside)linesman - official (in tennis, soccer, football, etc.) who assists the referee in some way (especially by watching for out of bounds or offside)
official - someone who administers the rules of a game or sport; "the golfer asked for an official who could give him a ruling"
2.linesman - a person who installs or repairs electrical or telephone lineslinesman - a person who installs or repairs electrical or telephone lines
gaffer - an electrician responsible for lighting on a movie or tv set
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
Translations
مُساعِد الحَكَم في كُرة القَدَم
pomezní rozhodčí
dommerlinievogter
johtoasentajalinjatuomari
partjelzővonalbíró
línuvörîur
čiarový rozhodca
yan hakem

linesman

[ˈlaɪnzmən] N (linesmen (pl))
1. (Sport) → juez m de línea, linier m
2. (Rail, Telec) → guardavía mf
3. (Elec) → celador m, recorredor m de la línea

linesman

[ˈlaɪnzmən] n
(TENNIS)juge mf de ligne
(FOOTBALL)juge mf de toucheline-up [ˈlaɪnʌp] n
[people, things] → affiche f
a line-up of musicians and comedy acts → une affiche constituée de musiciens et de sketches
Heading this year's line-up is Elton John → Elton John est la tête d'affiche de cette année.
(also police line-up) → parade f d'identification, séance f d'identification
(SPORT) (= team) → composition f de l'équipe

linesman

n pl <-men> (Sport) → Linienrichter m; (Rail) → Streckenwärter m; (Elec, Telec) → Leitungsmann m; (for faults) → Störungssucher m

linesman

[ˈlaɪnzmən] n (-men (pl)) (Sport) → guardalinee m inv, segnalinee m inv (Telec) → guardafili m inv

line1

(lain) noun
1. (a piece of) thread, cord, rope etc. She hung the washing on the line; a fishing-rod and line.
2. a long, narrow mark, streak or stripe. She drew straight lines across the page; a dotted/wavy line.
3. outline or shape especially relating to length or direction. The ship had very graceful lines; A dancer uses a mirror to improve his line.
4. a groove on the skin; a wrinkle.
5. a row or group of objects or persons arranged side by side or one behind the other. The children stood in a line; a line of trees.
6. a short letter. I'll drop him a line.
7. a series or group of persons which come one after the other especially in the same family. a line of kings.
8. a track or direction. He pointed out the line of the new road; a new line of research.
9. the railway or a single track of the railway. Passengers must cross the line by the bridge only.
10. a continuous system (especially of pipes, electrical or telephone cables etc) connecting one place with another. a pipeline; a line of communication; All (telephone) lines are engaged.
11. a row of written or printed words. The letter contained only three lines; a poem of sixteen lines.
12. a regular service of ships, aircraft etc. a shipping line.
13. a group or class (of goods for sale) or a field of activity, interest etc. This has been a very popular new line; Computers are not really my line.
14. an arrangement of troops, especially when ready to fight. fighting in the front line.
verb
1. to form lines along. Crowds lined the pavement to see the Queen.
2. to mark with lines.
lineage (ˈliniidʒ) noun
ancestry.
linear (ˈliniə) adjective
of, consisting of or like a line or lines.
lined adjective
having lines. lined paper; a lined face.
ˈliner noun
a ship or aircraft of a regular line or company. They sailed to America in a large liner.
lines noun plural
the words an actor has to say. He had difficulty remembering his lines.
ˈlinesman (ˈlainz-) noun
in sport, a judge or umpire at a boundary line.
hard lines!
bad luck!.
in line for
likely to get or to be given something. He is in line for promotion.
in/out of line with
in or out of agreement with. His views are out of line with those of his colleagues.
line up
1. to form a line. The children lined up ready to leave the classroom; She lined up the chairs.
2. to collect and arrange in readiness. We've lined up several interesting guests to appear on the programme (noun ˈline-up).
read between the lines
to understand something (from a piece of writing etc) which is not actually stated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under 15s: One club charged with player misconduct, 12 charges of spectator misconduct, 22 charges of misconduct by linesmen or club officials, 108 players sent off, seven games abandoned.
It was a good decision by the referee because the ball clearly came off the Villa player - but refs don't always question their linesmen.
Generally, players who are fighting will stop when the time is right and the linesmen move in.
WE should be astonished that linesmen get so many decisions right, not appalled that they get a few wrong.
The referee gave the goal, but the linesmen delayed three or four seconds and then puts his flag up.
No, it's just time to bring in referees and linesmen who know the rules.
Having attended the Town match on Tuesday night I continue to be exasperated as to why referees and linesmen cannot identify the clearest of penalty incidents.
When is he going to realise that arguing with referees and linesmen will not change a decision?
I asked the ref to watch on TV and acknowledge his linesmen made mistakes.
McGinlay, who was regarded as Scotland top whistler in the 1980s, admits he didn't like linesmen interfering too much when he was in the middle.
When linesmen are in line with play and cannot do their job, what is their point?