ling


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Related to ling: ling zhi

ling 1

 (lĭng)
n. pl. ling or lings
Any of various marine food fishes closely related to and resembling the cod, especially Molva molva of northern Atlantic waters, having a long body and a barbel on the chin.

[Middle English, possibly of Low German origin; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

ling 2

 (lĭng)
n.

[Middle English, from Old Norse lyng.]

ling

(lɪŋ)
n, pl ling or lings
1. (Animals) any of several gadoid food fishes of the northern coastal genus Molva, esp M. molva, having an elongated body with long fins
2. (Animals) another name for burbot
[C13: probably from Low German; related to long1]

ling

(lɪŋ)
n
(Plants) another name for heather1
[C14: from Old Norse lyng]
ˈlingy adj

ling1

(lɪŋ)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) ling, (esp. for kinds or species) lings.
1. an elongated, codlike marine food fish, Molva molva, of Greenland and N Europe.
2. the burbot.
3. any of various other elongated food fishes.
[1250–1300; Middle English ling, lenge; akin to early Dutch linghe, lenghe, Old Norse langa, and to long1]

ling2

(lɪŋ)

n.
the heather, Calluna vulgaris.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old Norse lyng]

-ling1

,
a suffix of nouns, often pejorative, denoting one concerned with (hireling; underling) or forming a diminutive (princeling; duckling).
[Middle English, Old English, c. Old Saxon, Old High German -ling, Old Norse -lingr, Gothic -liggs; see -le, -ing1]

-ling2

,
an adverbial suffix expressing direction, position, or state: darkling.
[Middle English, Old English; adv. use of gradational variant of lang long1]

ling.

linguistics.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ling - water chestnut whose spiny fruit has two rather than 4 prongsling - water chestnut whose spiny fruit has two rather than 4 prongs
water chestnut, water chestnut plant, caltrop - a plant of the genus Trapa bearing spiny four-pronged edible nutlike fruits
2.ling - common Old World heath represented by many varietiesling - common Old World heath represented by many varieties; low evergreen grown widely in the northern hemisphere
heath - a low evergreen shrub of the family Ericaceae; has small bell-shaped pink or purple flowers
Calluna, genus Calluna - one species
3.ling - elongated marine food fish of Greenland and northern Europeling - elongated marine food fish of Greenland and northern Europe; often salted and dried
gadoid, gadoid fish - a soft-finned fish of the family Gadidae
4.ling - American hakes
hake - any of several marine food fishes related to cod
5.ling - elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouthling - elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouth
codfish, cod - major food fish of Arctic and cold-temperate waters
Translations
kanervamolva

ling

1 [lɪŋ] N (ling or lings (pl)) (= fish) → abadejo m

ling

2 [lɪŋ] N (Bot) → brezo m

ling

1
n (Zool) → Leng(fisch) m

ling

2
n (Bot) → Heidekraut nt

ling

1 [lɪŋ] n (Bot) → brugo

ling

2 [lɪŋ] n (fish) → molva
References in classic literature ?
The water is up in Wine Creek," cried Joe Wel- ling with the air of Pheidippides bringing news of the victory of the Greeks in the struggle at Mara- thon.
When George Willard had been for a year on the Winesburg Eagle, four things happened to Joe Wel- ling.
So they took it, hand- ling it as cautiously and devoutly as if it had been some holy thing come from some supernatural region; and gently felt of its texture, caressed its pleasant smooth surface with lingering touch, and scanned the mysterious characters with fascinated eyes.
I was cogitating what the mystery might be, and determined Catherine should never suffer to benefit him or any one else, by my good will; when, hearing a rustle among the ling, I looked up and saw Mr.
Dark, prick- ling blood had flushed into his cheeks and brow.
I came off victorious on every occasion--being backed by the noble behavior of Lady Malkinshaw, who abstained from tumb ling down, and who ate and drank, and slept and grew lusty, for three weeks together.
Ah, well, Liu Ling was wiser than you," the White Logic girds.
I nod my head--Liu Ling, a hard drinker, one of the group of bibulous poets who called themselves the Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove and who lived in China many an ancient century ago.
It was Liu Ling," prompts the White Logic, "who declared that to a drunken man the affairs of this world appear but as so much duckweed on a river.
Plop, plop, plop; ting, ling, ling; bell and horse-shoes, horse-shoes and bell, until the colossal figure of C.
But why record all the swift steps of the appal- ling discovery?
The sea was polished, was blue, was pellucid, was spark- ling like a precious stone, extending on all sides, all round to the horizon--as if the whole terrestrial globe had been one jewel, one colossal sapphire, a single gem fashioned into a planet.