lingua franca


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lingua fran·ca

 (frăng′kə)
n. pl. lingua fran·cas (-kəz) also linguae fran·cae (frăng′kē, frăn′sē)
1. A medium of communication between peoples of different languages.
2. A mixture of Italian with Provençal, French, Spanish, Arabic, Greek, and Turkish, formerly spoken on the eastern Mediterranean coast.

[Italian : lingua, language + franca, Frankish (that is, European).]

lingua franca

(ˈlɪŋɡwə ˈfræŋkə)
n, pl lingua francas or linguae francae (ˈlɪŋɡwiː ˈfrænsiː)
1. (Linguistics) a language used for communication among people of different mother tongues
2. (Linguistics) a hybrid language containing elements from several different languages used in this way
3. (Linguistics) any system of communication providing mutual understanding
[C17: Italian, literally: Frankish tongue]

Lingua Franca

n
(Languages) a particular lingua franca spoken from the time of the Crusades to the 18th century in the ports of the Mediterranean, based on Italian, Spanish, French, Arabic, Greek, and Turkish

lin′gua fran′ca

(ˈfræŋ kə)

n., pl. lingua fran•cas, lin•guae fran•cae (ˈlɪŋ gwi ˈfræn si, ˈfræŋ ki)
1. any language that is widely used as a means of communication among speakers of other languages.
2. (caps.) a pidgin with a lexicon drawn largely from Italian that was spoken in Mediterranean ports from the late Middle Ages to the early 20th century.
[1670–80; < Italian: literally, Frankish tongue]

lingua franca

A language used for communication between speakers of different languages, often containing elements of several languages.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lingua franca - a common language used by speakers of different languages; "Koine is a dialect of ancient Greek that was the lingua franca of the empire of Alexander the Great and was widely spoken throughout the eastern Mediterranean area in Roman times"
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
Translations

lingua franca

[ˌlɪŋgwəˈfræŋkə] N (lingua francas or linguae francae (pl)) [ˌlɪŋgwiːˈfrænsiː]lengua f franca

lingua franca

[ˌlɪŋgwəˈfræŋkə] nlingua f franca

lingua franca

nVerkehrssprache f, → Lingua franca f; (= official language)Amtssprache f

lingua franca

[ˈlɪŋgwəˈfræŋkə] nlingua franca
References in classic literature ?
At the mention of Monte Cristo Dantes started with joy; he rose to conceal his emotion, and took a turn around the smoky tavern, where all the languages of the known world were jumbled in a lingua franca.
I asked you, my children,'' said the Prior, raising his voice, and using the lingua Franca, or mixed language, in which the Norman and Saxon races conversed with each other, ``if there be in this neighbourhood any good man, who, for the love of God, and devotion to Mother Church, will give two of her humblest servants, with their train, a night's hospitality and refreshment?
There were several of his priests and lawyers present (as I conjectured by their habits), who were commanded to address themselves to me; and I spoke to them in as many languages as I had the least smattering of, which were High and Low Dutch, Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, and Lingua Franca, but all to no purpose.
Every dialect from Labrador to Long Island, with Portuguese, Neapolitan, Lingua Franca, French, and Gaelic, with songs and shoutings and new oaths, rattled round him, and he seemed to be the butt of it all.
Davies also worked at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute as science editor and program administrator and has written for numerous publications including The Times, New Scientist, THES, Newton, Lingua Franca and Prospect.
Sokal's hoax purports to adopt the language of "epistemic relativism" and post-Modern literary theory - "allusions, metaphors, and puns substitu[ting] for evidence and logic," as he put it in the May/June Lingua Franca item that revealed his scare - as a way to "prove" the opposite case, in support of scientific "truth": "There is a real world; its properties are not merely social constructions; facts and evidence do matter.
IP is the lingua franca of multimedia communications -- voice, data, and video -- and Lingo is poised to deliver this.
Thomas (1896-1961) wrote his 1929 novel not in English, the language of the British colonizers of Nigeria, but in the lingua franca of the Yoruba cultural space.
While my method was satirical, my motivation is utterly serious,'' Sokal wrote in a separate article in the current issue of the magazine Lingua Franca, in which he revealed the hoax and detailed his ``intellectual and political'' motivations.
Our first lodgings were on Little Torch Key at mile marker 28 - the green-and-white mile markers being the lingua franca for Keys geography.
With Evident Enterprise 5, IT and Finance finally have the lingua franca they need to really transform the management of IT investments.
As the trendy language of virtuality and the simulated hyperreal becomes the lingua franca of academe, art scene, and mass market, Guy Debord, author of the much misrepresented Society of the Spectacle and most notorious of the Situationists, has been eclipsed by other cult figures of critical theory.