links


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Related to links: Linx

links

 (lĭngks)
pl.n.
1. A golf course.
2.
a. Chiefly Scots Relatively flat or undulating sandy turf-covered ground usually along a seashore. Also called linksland.
b. A golf course located on such land or on similarly treeless sandy terrain inland. Also called links course.

[From Middle English link, ridge of land, hill, from Old English hlinc, ridge.]

links

(lɪŋks)
pl n
1. (Golf)
a. short for golf links
b. (as modifier): a links course.
2. (Physical Geography) chiefly Scot undulating sandy ground near the shore
[Old English hlincas plural of hlinc ridge]

golf′ course`


n.
the usu. rolling 9- or 18-hole area of terrain, with greens and fairways, over which golf is played. Also called golf′ links`.

links

  • cuff link - Links the split cuff of a shirt.
  • portal - An Internet site offering a directory of links to other sites.
  • latch - Once was a loop or noose; a latch of links was a string of sausages.
  • vincula - Links, ties, and bonds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.links - a golf course that is built on sandy ground near a shorelinks - a golf course that is built on sandy ground near a shore
golf course, links course - course consisting of a large landscaped area for playing golf
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
سواحِلملْعَب الغولْف
golfové hřištěpobřežní duny
golfbane
partszakasz
golfvöllursandöldur
plokščia jūros pakrantė
golfa laukumskāpas
pobrežné duny
denize yakın düz yergolf sahasıkumsal

links

[lɪŋks] NPL
1. (= golf links) → campo msing or (LAm) cancha fsing de golf
2. (= cuff links) → gemelos mpl, mancuernas fpl (CAm, Mex)

links

[ˈlɪŋks] npl (GOLF)(terrain m de) golf mlink-up [ˈlɪŋkʌp] n
(= relationship) → association f
[communication systems] → liaison f
[spaceships] → arrimage m

links

pl
Dünen pl
(= golf course)Golfplatz m

links

[lɪŋks] npl (golf links) → terreno or campo da golf

links

(liŋks) noun plural
1. a stretch of more or less flat ground along a seashore.
2. (often with singular verb) a golf course.
References in classic literature ?
Out, therefore it came, and with it many necessary links in the story.
If a rock, or a rivulet, or a bit of earth harder than common, severed the links of the clew they followed, the true eye of the scout recovered them at a distance, and seldom rendered the delay of a single moment necessary.
A similar yearning to renew the broken links of brotherhood with his kind sometimes showed itself in a milder form; and once it was made beautiful by the religion that lay even deeper than itself.
The chain that bound her here was of iron links, and galling to her inmost soul, but could never be broken.
The woman did not go on; she stayed right there--hour after hour, day after day, year after year, twisting sausage links and racing with death.
First you wrap a layer or two of blanket around your body, for a sort of cushion and to keep off the cold iron; then you put on your sleeves and shirt of chain mail -- these are made of small steel links woven together, and they form a fabric so flexible that if you toss your shirt onto the floor, it slumps into a pile like a peck of wet fish-net; it is very heavy and is nearly the uncomfortablest material in the world for a night shirt, yet plenty used it for that -- tax collectors, and reformers, and one-horse kings with a defective title, and those sorts of people; then you put on your shoes -- flat-boats roofed over with interleaving bands of steel -- and screw your clumsy spurs into the heels.
I am only bound to invoke Memory where I know her responses will possess some degree of interest; therefore I now pass a space of eight years almost in silence: a few lines only are necessary to keep up the links of connection.
Meanwhile the fog and darkness thickened so, that people ran about with flaring links, proffering their services to go before horses in carriages, and conduct them on their way.
He had no distinct idea about the baptism and the church-going, except that Dolly had said it was for the good of the child; and in this way, as the weeks grew to months, the child created fresh and fresh links between his life and the lives from which he had hitherto shrunk continually into narrower isolation.
They form the connecting links between the selfish and the social passions.
The four Eastern States, from all the causes that form the links of national sympathy and connection, may with certainty be expected to unite.
Throwing the links about his waist, it was but the work of a few seconds to secure it.