lint


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lint

 (lĭnt)
n.
1. Clinging bits of fiber and fluff; fuzz.
2. Downy material obtained by scraping linen cloth and used for dressing wounds.
3. The mass of soft fibers surrounding the seeds of unginned cotton.

[Middle English, variant of linet (from Old French linette, grain of flax, diminutive of lin, flax) or from Medieval Latin linteum, lint (from Latin, linen cloth), both from Latin līnum, flax; see lī̆no- in Indo-European roots.]

lint′less adj.
lint′y adj.

lint

(lɪnt)
n
1. (Textiles) an absorbent cotton or linen fabric with the nap raised on one side, used to dress wounds, etc
2. (Textiles) shreds of fibre, yarn, etc
3. (Textiles) chiefly US staple fibre for making cotton yarn
[C14: probably from Latin linteus made of linen, from līnum flax]
ˈlinty adj

lint

(lɪnt)

n.
1. minute shreds or ravelings of yarn.
2. staple cotton fiber used to make yarn.
3. a soft material for dressing wounds, made from linen.
[1325–75; Middle English, variant of linnet; compare Middle French linette linseed, Old English līnet- flax in līnetwige linnet]
lint′y, adj. lint•i•er, lint•i•est.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lint - fine ravellings of cotton or linen fiberslint - fine ravellings of cotton or linen fibers
fiber, fibre - a slender and greatly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarn
raveling, ravelling - a bit of fiber that has become separated from woven fabric
2.lint - cotton or linen fabric with the nap raised on one side; used to dress wounds
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations
قِطَع صَغيرَه من القُطننَسيج كُتّاني لِتَضْميد الجِراح
cupaninašatovina
fnuggazebindnullermand
nukka
tépés
línskaf
korpija
šarpija, kokvilnas pluči
textilný prachvyzrnené bavlnené vlákno
hafif tüyketen tiftiği

lint

[lɪnt] Nhilas fpl

lint

[ˈlɪnt] ntissu ouaté (pour pansements)

lint

nScharpie f, → Mull m

lint

[lɪnt] n (Med) → garza

lint

(lint) noun
1. linen in the form of a soft fluffy material for putting over wounds.
2. very small pieces of fluff from cotton etc.

lint

1. n. fibra de algodón;
2. partículas desprendidas de la ropa.
References in classic literature ?
What a pity they didn't stop up the chinks and the crannies though, and thrust in a little lint here and there.
The combatants were placed face to face, each with several members of his own corps about him to assist; two seconds, well padded, and with swords in their hands, took their stations; a student belonging to neither of the opposing corps placed himself in a good position to umpire the combat; another student stood by with a watch and a memorandum-book to keep record of the time and the number and nature of the wounds; a gray-haired surgeon was present with his lint, his bandages, and his instruments.
But in case this should not occur, the knights of old took care to see that their squires were provided with money and other requisites, such as lint and ointments for healing purposes; and when it happened that knights had no squires
I threw up my arm to defend myself from the blow that flung me headlong with a broken forearm; and the great monster, swathed in lint and with red-stained bandages fluttering about it, leapt over me and passed.
Ask his lackey how often he has had to prepare lint of him.
Many articles of clothing and a good part of my plate have since been picked up in different quarters of the town, lint the furniture in general was cut to pieces before it was thrown out of the house, and most of the beds cut open, and the feathers thrown out of the windows.
With the sound of a faint explosion it vanished into the thick weather bodily, leaving behind of its stout substance not so much as one solitary strip big enough to be picked into a handful of lint for, say, a wounded elephant.
An ambulance orderly appeared with a huge basket full of lint rolls, provided by the forethought of the Queen for such as might need them later on.
Remarkable, thou wilt please to provide linen for lint and bandages.
There was something touching which went to the soul, in the care with which Servin lifted the lint and touched the lacerated flesh, while the face of the wounded man, though pale and sickly, expressed, as he looked at the girl, more pleasure than suffering.
The doctor, taking an old handkerchief, quickly prepared a little lint, which he spread over the wounds, after having washed them.
It's well that the charitable Prussian ladies send us two pounds of coffee and some lint each month or we should be lost