lip-reading


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Related to lip-reading: Speechreading

lip-read

(lĭp′rēd′)
v. lip-read (-rĕd′), lip-read·ing, lip-reads
v.tr.
To interpret (utterances) by lip reading.
v.intr.
To interpret utterances by lip reading.

lip-reading

n
(Medicine) a method used by deaf people to comprehend spoken words by interpreting movements of the speaker's lips. Also called: speech-reading
ˈlip-ˌreader n
Translations

lip-reading

[ˈlɪpˌriːdɪŋ] Nlectura f de labios

lip-reading

[ˈlɪpˌriːdɪŋ] nlettura delle labbra, labiolettura
References in classic literature ?
Just as, with you, the deaf and dumb, if once allowed to gesticulate and to use the hand-alphabet, will never acquire the more difficult but far more valuable art of lipspeech and lip-reading, so it is with us as regards "Seeing" and "Feeling".
The lip-reading ploy is not new to the Premiership champions.
Hannah Fargher, 50, from Maghull, is the administration manager in the employee benefits business unit at Swiss Life, Albert Dock, but she will never forget her first job - thanks to an infamous lip-reading incident.
1 What's the name of the deaf, lip-reading dog in Due South?
Lip-reading is not easy and being deaf actually makes it more difficult to lip-read, not easier.
Many hearing-impaired people have trained as lip-reading teachers.
These include enabling people to develop lip-reading and other communication skills and helping those who use hearing aids to get greater benefit from them.
A weekly lip-reading class at Reseda's Jewish Home for the Aging not only offers valuable knowledge but also provides a haven where students can discuss hearing issues with others who face the same challenges.
She continued: "I prepared a joint report with another woman lip-reading expert in March this year, and I came to the conclusion that the tape had been altered in some way.
As a result of her astonishing work, lip-reading is now admissable evidence in British courts following a ruling by a judge in a case in which Elinor was involved.
At certain noise levels, lip-reading can increase word recognition performance from 10 to 60 percent correct," Ma says in a study report, published in the open access journal PLoS ONE.
The college already runs lip-reading classes and, from September, is set to run a new range of courses for people interested in working with deaf people.